100 Exquisite Adjectives to Know and Start using in Sentences

 Adjectives are part of the sentence that is used to describe words, such as nouns and pronouns. They are describing words used to provide more information regarding the words. They act as a complement to linking verbs or the verb to be. There are many types of adjectives that the writers are allowed to use, such as cool adjectives, fun adjectives, and exquisite adjectives. These adjectives are used to tell the readers what the content writers are talking about. It beautifies the sentences to avoid boring the readers by providing entertainment. However, these different articles have various tones and sounds to them. Cool and Fun adjectives are used for a more conversational type of content. Exquisite adjectives are used for more professional and formal content. It means that content writers must know what kind of adjectives they must use for the type of content they are writing. 

Listed below are the 100 Exquisite Adjectives to Know and Start using in Sentences.

  • Adamant: Adamant is defined as “stubborn not to change the mind or to be persuaded.” It means “unshakable” and “unbreakable hard substance.” 
  • Adroit: Adroit is defined as “clever and showing skill.” It means “being smart in handling situations.” 
  • Amatory: Amatory is defined as “relating to or connected with sexual desire or activity.” It means “lovemaking or expressing sexual love.” 
  • Animistic: Animistic is used to describe someone that believes that spirits are separable from their bodies.” 
  • Antic: Antic is defined as “characterized by clownish extravagance or absurdity.” It means “whimsically lighthearted,” “behavior which is unreasonable or dangerous,” and “behavior that is silly and funny in a way that people usually like.”
  • Arcadian: Arcadian is defined as “serene,” rural,” “simple,” or “innocent.” It is used to describe a pleasant and quiet place.
  • Baleful: Baleful is defined as “the way somebody looks at another person or something. Someone “baleful” threatens to harm another person.”
  • Bellicose: Bellicose is defined as “having or showing a desire to argue or fight.” It means “favoring or inclined to start quarrels or wars.” 
  • Bilious: Bilious is defined as “temperament disposition” and “unpleasant.” Bilious is a yellow or greenish fluid secreted by the liver because of liver dysfunction.
  • Boorish: Boorish is defined as “unpleasant,” “rude,” or “insensitive.” Someone that is “boorish” disregards other people’s feelings.
  • Calamitous: Calamitous describes something “that causes great damage to people’s lives or property.” It is similar to the word “disastrous,” meaning “terrible” or “horrendous.” 
  • Caustic: Caustic describes something “that gets destroyed or dissolved.” Additionally, the word is used to describe something that is “sarcastic” or “in a bitter way.” 
  • Cerulean: Cerulean is defined as “deep blue in color.” It is used together with a word that is in the color blue, such as water or sky. 
  • Comely: Comely describes something that is “pleasant to look at.” It is generally used to describe an appearance. Additionally, it is used to describe someone that has “features or qualities that make something seem interesting and worth having.” 
  • Concomitant: Concomitant describes something “accompanying especially in a subordinate or incidental way.” It means something is happening at the same time as something else, primarily because one thing is related to or causes the other.
  • Contumacious: Contumacious describes someone that has no respect for authority.” It means “stubbornly disobedient.” It is synonymous to the word “rebellious.”
  • Corpulent: Corpulent describes someone as “having a large bulky body.” Corpulent is synonymous with the words “obese” or “fat.” 
  • Crapulous: Crapulous describes something “marked by overindulgence in eating or drinking.” Crapulous is the feeling of being unwell because of excessive liquor and food.
  • Defamatory: Defamatory is a dishonest statement about someone else, resulting in hurting their image and stature. It harms somebody by saying or writing harmful or inaccurate information about somebody.
  • Didactic: Didactic pertains to something or someone that educates others about something, such as a moral lesson or behavior. 
  • Dilatory: Dilatory describes a thing or a person that is  “delayed.” It is somehow similar to the word “procrastination.”
  • Dowdy: Dowdy describes something as “boring,” “not attractive or fashionable.” It means that someone or something is not neat and lacks taste.
  • Efficacious: Efficacious is defined as “having the power to produce the desired effect.” 
  • Effulgent: Effulgent describes something “shining brightly.” It means that something shows great happiness or goodness. It is a suitable replacement for words such as “shiny,” “dazzling,” and “bright.”
  • Egregious: Egregious describes something as “extremely bad,” “egregious behavior,” or “archaic.” It is similar to the word “flagrant,” meaning “conspicuously offensive.”
  • Endemic: Endemic describes a thing as “belonging or native to a particular people or country.” It is defined as a “characteristic of or prevalent in a certain field, area, or environment.”
  • Equanimous: Equanimous describes someone as “displaying evenness of mind, especially under stress.” It means “even-tempered and balanced.”
  • Execrable: Execrable describes a thing as “very bad” or “terrible.” It is defined as “utterly evil or detestable.” 
  • Fastidious: Fastidious describes something as “being careful that every detail of something is correct.” It is defined as “not liking things to be dirty or untidy.” Something or someone that is “Fastidious” shows excessive delicacy or care.
  • Feckless: Feckless describes a thing as “weak” or “ineffective.” It means “worthless” or “irresponsible” as well.
  • Fecund: Fecund describes a thing or someone as “fruitful in offspring or vegetation.” They are able to produce a lot of children. It means someone that is intellectually productive or inventive to a marked degree as well. They are able to produce new useful things, especially ideas.”
  • Friable: Friable describes a thing as “easily crumbled or pulverized.” It means it is “effortlessly broken up into little fragments.” It means they are easily reduced to a powdered form.
  • Fulsome: Fulsome describes someone as “too generous in praising or thanking somebody.” It means that they are characterized by abundance. generous in amount, extent, or spirit.” Additionally, they are known to “be full and well developed.” It means they are “aesthetically, morally, or typically offensive.”
  • Garrulous: Garrulous is defined as “talking a lot, especially about unimportant things.” It means “given to prosy, rambling, or tedious talkativeness.” It means pointlessly or annoyingly talkative.
  • Guileless: Guileless is defined as “behaving in a very honest way.” People that are “Guileless” do not know how to trick people. It is synonymous with innocent and naive.
  • Gustatory: Gustatory describes a thing as “relating to or associated with eating.” It is connected with tasting or the sense of taste.
  • Heuristic: Heuristic is defined as “teaching or education encourages someone to learn by discovering things for themselves.” It involves or serves as an aid to learning, discovery, or problem-solving by experimental and especially trial-and-error methods. It describes something “of or relating to exploratory problem-solving techniques that utilize self-educating techniques, such as the evaluation of feedback to improve performance.”
  • Histrionic: Histrionic is defined as “behavior that is very emotional and is intended to attract attention in a way that does not seem sincere.” It means “deliberately affected” or “overly dramatic or emotional.” It is commonly used to describe actors, acting, or theater. Histrionic is pronounced as “hi-stree-o-nuhk.”
  • Hubristic: Hubristic describes a thing as “exaggerated pride or self-confidence.”
  • Incendiary: Incendiary describes a thing as “igniting combustible materials spontaneously.” It is related to or being a weapon, such as a bomb, designed to start fires. Something “incendiary” tends to excite or inflame, like arson. It is something that is scorching and is designed to cause fires. A new meaning of “incendiary” is “to cause strong feelings or violence.” 
  • Insidious: Incendiary describes a thing as “igniting combustible materials spontaneously.” It is related to or being a weapon, such as a bomb, designed to start fires. Something “incendiary” tends to excite or inflame, like arson. It is something that is scorching and is designed to cause fires. A new meaning of “incendiary” is “to cause strong feelings or violence.”   
  • Insolent: Insolent is defined as ​”extremely rude and showing a lack of respect.” Someone “insolent” is insultingly contemptuous in speech or conduct. They exhibit boldness or effrontery. Insolent is synonymous with “overbearing” and “impudent.”
  • Intransigent: Intransigent describes people as “unwilling to change their opinions or behavior in a way that would be helpful to others.” It is  a refusal to abandon an often extreme position or attitude. Intransigent is synonymous with “uncompromising,” meaning “making no concessions.”
  • Inveterate: Inveterate describes people as “always doing something or enjoying something.” It means “done or felt for a long time and unlikely to change. Inveterate is synonymous with “habitual,” meaning “usual for or typical of somebody or something.”
  • Invidious: Invidious describes a thing as “of an unpleasant or objectionable nature.” Another meaning of “invidious” is to be likely to offend somebody or make them jealous. Additionally, something or someone “invidious” causes harm or resentment and tends to cause dissatisfaction, hatred, or jealousy. Invidious is synonymous with “obnoxious,” meaning “wanting to be in the same situation as somebody else,” and “envious,” meaning “highly offensive.” 
  • Irksome: Irksome describes a thing as “tending to irritating or boring.” It means someone or something is ‘annoying” and “tiresome.” Irksome is pronounced as “uhk-sm.” 
  • Jejune: Jejune describes a thing as “devoid of significance or interest.” It means “lacking nutritive value,” “too simple,” or “dull.”
  • Jocular: Jocular describes something “humorous said or done as a joke.” It means something is funny, and someone is joking or enjoys making people laugh. “Jocular” means “habitually jolly.” Jocular is synonymous with “humorous,” meaning “possessing, indicating, or expressive of an ability to be funny.”
  • Judicious: Judicious describes a thing or someone as “careful” and “reasonable.” They show good judgment. 
  • Lachrymose: Lachrymose describes a thing as “tending to cry easily.” Something that makes someone cry is called “Lachrymose.”
  • Limpid: Limpid describes a thing as “marked by transparency.” It means that they are clear and straightforward in style. Something “limpid” means that it is serene and untroubled. Limpid is synonymous with “pellucid,” meaning “extremely clear.” 
  • Loquacious: Loquacious describes a person as “talking a lot.” It means that they are full of excessive talk.
  • Luminous: Luminous describes a thing as “emitting or reflecting usually steady, suffused, or glowing light.” It is defined as “relating to light” or “to luminous flux.” Something that is Luminous is “bathed in or exposed to steady light.”
  • Mannered: Mannered describes a person as “trying to impress people by being formal and not naturally. It means that they have the type of manners mentioned.” Additionally, it means that they have manners of a specified kind or displaying a particular manner.
  • Mendacious: Mendacious describes a person as “not telling the truth given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth.”
  • Meretricious: Meretricious describes a person as “relating to a prostitute.” It means they are tawdrily and falsely attractive superficially.
  • Minatory: Minatory describes a person as “presenting harm.” It is defined as a “characteristic of or prevalent in a certain field, area, or environment.” 
  • Mordant: Mordant describes a thing as “biting and caustic in thought, manner, or style.” It means “critical and unkind, but funny.” 
  • Munificent: Munificent describes a thing as “liberal in giving.”  Someone “munificent” means they are “generous.”
  • Nefarious: Nefarious describes a thing as “flagrantly wicked” or “impious.” It is defined as a “characteristic of or prevalent in a certain field, area, or environment.”
  • Noxious: Noxious describes a thing as “physically harmful” or “destructive to living beings.” It means “constituting a harmful influence on the mind or behavior.”
  • Obtuse: Obtuse describes a person as “unwilling to understand something.” Another meaning of “obtuse” is “an angle that exceeds 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees.”
  • Parsimonious: Parsimonious describes a person as “not willing to spend money.” It means they are frugal to the point of stinginess.
  • Pendulous: Pendulous describes a thing as “hanging down loosely and moving from side to side.”
  • Pernicious: Pernicious describes a thing as “highly injurious or destructive.”
  • Pervasive: Pervasive describes a thing as “existing or spreading through a part of something.”
  • Petulant: Petulant describes a thing as ‘behaving angrily” or “rude in speech or behavior.”  It is characterized by unpredictable ill humor.
  • Platitudinous: Platitudinous describes a thing as “uninteresting because it has been repeated many times before.” It is generally used to describe a “comment” or a “statement.”
  • Precipitate: Precipitate is described as “an act of throwing violently.” It means that something bad is happening untimely.
  • Propitious: Propitious describes something as “favorably good” or “being a pleasing omen.” Something “propitious” means it is “likely to deliver a great outcome.” 
  • Puckish: Puckish describes someone as “enjoying playing tricks on other people.
  • Querulous: Querulous describes someone as “habitually complaining.” It means that someone is showing that they are “annoyed.”
  • Quiescent: Quiescent describes something as “quiet” or “not active.” Quiescent, in medical terms, is used to indicate something as “developing.”
  • Rebarbative: Rebarbative describes something or someone as “not attractive” or “causing strong dislike.” It is synonymous with “repellent” and irritating,” meaning “very unpleasant” and “annoying.” 
  • Recalcitrant: Recalcitrant describes someone as “defiant of authority” or “unwilling to obey instructions.” They are difficult to manage or operate. Recalcitrant, in medical terms, is used to describe someone as “not responsive to treatment.” 
  • Redolent: Redolent describes something as “making you think of the thing mentioned.” It means that something is “full of a specified fragrance” or “smelling strong.” 
  • Rhadamanthine: Rhadamanthine describes a person as “precisely rigid” or “just.” Someone that is “rhadamanthine” is uncompromising. 
  • Risible: Risible describes something or someone as “deserving to be laughed at rather than taken seriously.” It means that they cause laughter or are associated with laughter.
  • Ruminative: Ruminative is defined as “to go over in mind repeatedly” and “often casually or slowly to chew repeatedly for an extended period.” Ruminative describes a person as “tending to think deeply and carefully about things.”
  • Sagacious: Sagacious describes a person as “of keen and farsighted penetration and judgment.” They are showing good judgment and understanding. 
  • Salubrious: Salubrious describes a place as “pleasant to live in.” It means that it is a clean and healthy place. 
  • Sartorial: Sartorial describes how clothes are made. It is defined as “relating to a tailor or tailored clothes.” It is commonly used for men’s clothes. 
  • Sclerotic: Sclerotic describes someone as “losing the ability to change and adapt.” Sclerotic, in medical terms, is defined as “becoming hard because of a medical condition.”
  • Serpentine: Serpentine describes something or someone as “subtly wily or tempting.” It means that something is “winding or turning one way and another, resembling a snake.” 
  • Spasmodic: Spasmodic describes something as “​happening suddenly for a short time.” It describes a feeling as “outbursts of emotional excitement.”
  • Strident: Strident describes something as “having a loud, rough and unpleasant sound.” Additionally, it means that something is “commanding attention by a loud or obtrusive quality.”
  • Taciturn: Taciturn describes someone as “temperamentally disinclined to talk.” Someone that is “taciturn” tends not to say very much and comes off unfriendly. 
  • Tenacious: Tenacious describes something or someone as “does not stop holding something or give up something easily.” It means that something is persistent in adhering to something. 
  • Tremulous: Tremulous describes something as “slightly shaking because you are nervous.” Something that is “tremulous” causes someone to shake.
  • Trenchant: Tremulous describes something as “slightly shaking because you are nervous.” Something that is “tremulous” causes someone to shake.
  • Turbulent: Turbulent describes something as “causing unrest, violence, or disturbance.” Something that is “turbulent” means there is a lot of sudden change, trouble, argument, and violence.
  • Turgid: Turgid describes a language or writing as “boring, complicated, and difficult to understand.” Another meaning of “turgid” is “swollen because of containing too much water.” 
  • Ubiquitous: Ubiquitous describes something as “existing or being everywhere at the same time.” It means that something is constantly encountered. 
  • Uxorious: Uxorious describes someone, specifically a husband, as “excessively fond of or submissive to a wife.” It is synonymous with “dominated.” 
  • Verdant: Verdant describes something with green in tint or color. It is commonly used to describe a thing that is fresh and green, such as a plant.
  • Voluble: Voluble describes something as “easily rolling” or “turning.” It describes something or someone as “talking a lot, and with enthusiasm, about a subject.” 
  • Voracious: Voracious describes someone as “having a huge appetite” or “excessively eager.” Another meaning of “voracious” is that a person wants to know more new information or knowledge. 
  • Wheedling: Wheedling describes something or someone as “to influence or entice by soft words or flattery.” It means they are persuasive by saying nice things about something or someone.
  • Withering: Withering describes something as “acting or serving to cut down or destroy.” Another meaning of “withering” is a look or remark intended to make somebody feel silly or ashamed.

     100. Zealous: Zealous describes something or someone as “​showing great energy and

enthusiasm for something.” It is synonymous with “committed” and “dedicated.”

Contents of the Article show

1. Adamant

Adamant is defined as “stubborn not to change the mind or to be persuaded.” It means “unshakable” and “unbreakable hard substance.” Adamant is pronounced as “a-duh-muhnt.” Adamant was derived from the Old English and French adamaunt, Greek “adamas” that means “untameable” or “invincible.” The first use of “Adamant” dates back to the early 1800s. Adamant is used to define a stone that is very hard. The word was used to describe actual stones or other things that are impenetrable, such as a diamond. For example, “He is adamant about not going on the trip.” The sentence means that the subject does not want to go on the trip and is not going to change their mind about not coming. 

2. Adroit

Adroit is defined as “clever and showing skill.” It means “being smart in handling situations.” Adroit is pronounced as “uh-droyt.” It is used to indicate expertise mentally. Adroit most often describes someone’s ability to achieve their goals despite difficulties. Adroit came from the Old French word “à droit,” meaning “handsome or elegant” and “skilled in combat.” The first use of “Adroit” dates back to the mid-17th century. For example, “The student presented her speech in an adroit way.” The sentence means that the student spoke skillfully. 

3. Amatory

Amatory is defined as “relating to or connected with sexual desire or activity.” It means “lovemaking or expressing sexual love.” Amatory is pronounced as “a-muh-tuh-ree.” Amatory came from the Latin word “amatorius” or “amator” meaning “lover,” and “amare” meaning “love” in the late 16th century. The first use of “Amatory” is known to date back in 1571. For example, “She made an amazing amatory poem.” The sentence means that the poet wrote a poem that exhibits sexual love. 

4. Animistic

Animistic is used to describe someone that believes that spirits are separable from their bodies.” Animistic is pronounced as “uh-nee-mees-tik.” Someone that is “Animistic“ believes that inanimate objects, such as plants and organic things, have spirits. For them objects like stone have a soul. Animistic came from the German word “animismus,” meaning “anima soul.” The first use of “Animistic” is known to date back to 1832. For example, “Me and my husband tend to contradict a lot because I am a Catholic and he is animistic.” The sentence means that the couple has two different beliefs. One believes in a God and the other beliefs in the existence of spirits separable from bodies. 

5. Antic

Antic is defined as “characterized by clownish extravagance or absurdity.” It means “whimsically lighthearted,” “behavior which is unreasonable or dangerous,” and “behavior that is silly and funny in a way that people usually like.” Antic is pronounced “an-tuhk.” Antic came from the Italian word antico, meaning “antique” or “grotesque.” The first use of Antic is known to date back to the early 16th century. The Renaissance Italians found fantastic mural paintings called “grottesca” during the time when they began exploring the ancient Roman ruins. The Italians called the murals “antichi,” loosely translated as “ancient things” because of how old they were. English speakers adopted antichi and modified it to “antike” or “anticke.” Antic began appearing as an English adjective within 20 years of its earliest recorded uses as a noun. It defines any behavior or dress that seems old became known as an “antic.” Initially, it meant “old” or “bizarre.” However, today it means “playful, funny, or absurd,” and the noun means “an often wildly playful or funny act.” Antic nowadays is generally used together with “amusing,” crazy,” and “playful.” The first use of “Antic” is known to date back to 1536. For example, “People find his antics amusing.” The sentence means that the audience finds the other person’s behavior funny.”

6. Arcadian

Arcadian is defined as “serene,” rural,” “simple,” or “innocent.” It is used to describe a pleasant and quiet place. Arcadian is pronounced as “aa-kay-dee-uhn.” Arcadian came from the Latin word “arcadius” and Greek word “arkadia.” Moreover, Arcadia is the name of a district in Greece. Additionally, Arcadian was the name of the home of Pan, the god of the wild in Greek Mythology. The first use of “Arcadian” is known to date back to 1565. A sentence example using Arcadian is, “I like staying here because of the arcadian atmosphere.” The sentence means that the subject likes the peaceful atmosphere of where they are staying.  

7. Baleful

Baleful is defined as “the way somebody looks at another person or something. Someone “baleful” threatens to harm another person.” Baleful means “having a harmful effect,” “deadly or harmful in influence,” “foreboding or threatening evil.” Baleful is pronounced as “bayl-ful. Baleful came from the Old English “bealu,” meaning “evil.” The word came from the Old English “bana,” meaning “slayer” or “murderer.” Moreover, Baleful came from the Middle English word “balefull” which is defined as “bent upon mischief or destruction” or “miserable.” Baleful and baneful are alike in meaning and slight in spelling. They are occasionally used in similar contexts. However, they differ in emphasis. Baleful describes what threatens or portends evil, while Baneful applies to what causes evil or destruction. The first use of “Baleful” is known to date back before the 12th century. A sentence example using “Baleful” is, “Zach’s life was ruined because of the baleful influence of his friends.” The sentence means that the destructive influence of Zach’s friends resulted in his life getting ruined. 

8. Bellicose

Bellicose is defined as “having or showing a desire to argue or fight.” It means “favoring or inclined to start quarrels or wars.” It is pronounced as “beh-luh-kows.” Bellicose describes an attitude that hopes for actual war, the word is generally applied to nations and their leaders. It was commonly used to describe such country leaders who believed their countries had everything to gain by starting wars in the 20th century. Bellicose came from the Middle English and Latin word “bellicosus.” The first use of “Bellicose” is known to date back to the 15th century. For example, “The bellicose class president of the pilot section always wants to compete with the other section.” The sentence means that the class president of the pilot section is a “war-freak,” that they always want to be on top of the other sections. 

9. Bilious

Bilious is defined as “temperament disposition” and “unpleasant.” Bilious is a yellow or greenish fluid secreted by the liver because of liver dysfunction; thus, it describes someone that looks like they are suffering from the disease. Bilious is pronounced as Bilious “bi-lee-uhs.” It is one of several words whose origins trace to the old belief that four bodily senses of humor control temperament. Bilious came from the Middle French word “bilieux,” meaning “short-tempered.” The first use of “Bilious” dates back to the mid-16th century. A sentence example using “Bilious” is, “The employee was sent home by the nurse because of her bilious face.” The sentence means the employee was asked to go home because of their sick-looking face. 

10. Boorish

Boorish is defined as “unpleasant,” “rude,” or “insensitive.” Someone that is “boorish” disregards other people’s feelings. Boorish is pronounced as “baw-ruhsh.” They tend to be unagreeable because of their bad manners. Boorish came from the Old English word boor, meaning “countrymen,” “herdsmen,” or “peasant farmer.” Boors, or herdsmen, spend less time interacting with other people and more time with themselves, which makes them have unrefined manners, unlike the people living in the city. The first use of “Boorish” is known to date back to 1562. A sentence example using “Boorish” is, “Nobody likes Emma because of her boorish attitude.” The sentence means that no one likes Emma because of Emma’s insensitive attitude.

11. Calamitous

Calamitous describes something “that causes great damage to people’s lives or property.” It is similar to the word “disastrous,” meaning “terrible” or “horrendous.” Calamitous is generally used together with events such as earthquakes or typhoons. Calamitous is pronounced as “kuh-la-muh-tuhs.” It came from the Middle English word “calamytey,” Latin word “calamitat” and “calamitas.” The first known use of “Calamitous” was in 1545. A sentence example using “Calamitous” is, “The calamitous typhoon destroyed the houses in the community.” The sentence means that the tremendous typhoon has destroyed the houses of the people within the community. 

12. Caustic

Caustic describes something “that gets destroyed or dissolved.” Additionally, the word is used to describe something that is “sarcastic” or “in a bitter way.” Caustic is pronounced as “kaw-stuhk.” Caustic was borrowed into English in the 14th century from the Latin “causticus,” which derives from the Greek “kaustikos,” meaning “combustible.” Kaustikos, in turn, comes from the Greek verb “kaiein,” meaning “to burn.” The first known use of “Caustic” is from the 14th century. A sentence example using “Caustic” is, “The host’s caustic side comments make it unbearable to be focused on the interview.” Caustic is defined in the sentence as a “sarcastic” or “bitter way.” It means that the bitter comments of the host make it hard to stay focused on the interview show.” Another example is, “Keep your distance from that caustic substance.” The sentence means that the substance tends to burn.

13. Cerulean

Cerulean is defined as “deep blue.” It is used to describe words that are colored blue, such as water or sky. Cerulean is pronounced as “suh-roo-lee-uhn.” It was derived from the Latin words “caeruleus” and “caelum,” meaning “ blue” and “sky,” respectively. The first known use of “Cerulean” was in 1599. A sentence example using “Cerulean” is, “I love laying down at night looking at the cerulean sky.” The sentence means that the sky is blue or dark blue. 

14. Comely

Comely describes something that is “pleasant to look at.” It is generally used to describe an appearance. Additionally, it is used to describe someone that has “features or qualities that make something seem interesting and worth having.” Comely is similar to the words “attractive” and “appealing.” Comely is pronounced as “kuhm-lee.” Comely was derived from the Middle English word “becomely,” meaning “fitting” or “becoming.” It was once used more broadly for other appealing things, such as fine clothing, although comely is now typically used to describe the appearance of human beings. Comely was derived from the Old English words variously meaning “glorious,” “lively,” or “fine.” Moreover, it was derived from the French word “attractif” and the Latin word “attractivus.” A sentence example using “Comely” is, “Boys like her because she is comely.” The sentence states that the girl is pleasant to look at, which is why many boys like the girl.

15. Concomitant

Concomitant describes something “accompanying especially in a subordinate or incidental way.” It means something is happening at the same time as something else, primarily because one thing is related to or causes the other. It is synonymous with “related,” “associated,” and “linked.” Concomitant is pronounced as “kuhng-ko-muh-tnt.” Concomitant was introduced into English when many people criticized the use of Latin forms in favor of more “native” words from Old English. Concomitant was derived from the Latin words “concomitari,” meaning “to accompany,” and “comés,” meaning “companion.” The two Latin words did not survive to accompany “concomitant” into the 18th century. A sentence example using “Concomitant” is, “Loss of memory is a natural concomitant of old age.” The sentence means that loss of memory is related to someone getting old.  

16. Contumacious

Contumacious describes someone that has no respect for authority.” It means “stubbornly disobedient.” It is synonymous to the word “rebellious.” Contumacious is pronounced as “kon-chuh-may-shuhs.” It is used in legal situations, such as court proceedings, instead of “rebellious” or “unruly.” Contumacious is derived from the Latin word “contumax,” meaning “rebellious” or “showing contempt of court.” Contumacious is related to “contumely,” meaning “harsh language or treatment arising from haughtiness and contempt.” The first known use of “Contumacious” was in 1583. A sentence example using “Contumacious” is, “He served time in jail because of his contumacious attitude.” The sentence means that the person was imprisoned because of lacking respect for authority.  

17. Corpulent

Corpulent describes someone as “having a large bulky body.” Corpulent is synonymous with the words “obese” or “fat.” Corpulent is pronounced as “kaw-pyuh-luhnt.” The word was commonly used way back in the day. However, “corpulent” is less often used than they once were. Instead, “Obese” and “Obesity” is more likely to be used. The first known use of “Corpulent” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Corpulent” is, “He got bullied because of his corpulent figure.” The sentence means that other people were mocking the boy because of being fat. 

18. Crapulous

Crapulous describes something “marked by overindulgence in eating or drinking.” Crapulous is the feeling of being unwell because of excessive liquor and food. It is pronounced as “kra-pyuh-luhs.” It came from the Latin words “crapulosus,” meaning “crappy,” and “crapula,” meaning “intoxication.” Additionally, “Crapula” came from the Greek word “kraipalē,” meaning a headache because of drinking excessive alcohol. “Crapulous” was first used in the 1530s. A sentence example using “Crapulous” is, “I vomited because I feel dreadfully crapulous.” The sentence means that the person vomited because of being intoxicated. 

19. Defamatory

Defamatory is a dishonest statement about someone else, resulting in hurting their image and stature. It harms somebody by saying or writing harmful or inaccurate information about somebody. Defamatory is pronounced as “duh-fa-muh-tuh-ree.” It is synonymous with “calumny,” “slander,” and “libel.” Someone subjected to “defamatory” is allowed to sue the one who said the slanderous statements. The first known use of “Defamatory” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Defamatory” is, “The defamatory statement by the journalist got him arrested.” The sentence means that the journalist made false statements that harmed somebody else, which got the journalist arrested.  

20. Didactic

Didactic pertains to something or someone that educates others about something, such as a moral lesson or behavior. Didactic is pronounced as “duh-dak-tuhk.” A “didactic” person tells people things rather than letting them find out for themselves. It is intended to teach other people by giving them instructions and information. Didactic came from the Greek word “didaktikós,” meaning “apt at teaching.” Didaktikós comes from “didáskein,” meaning “to teach.” Didactic conveyed that neutral meaning when it was first borrowed in the 17th century. Something described as “didactic” is often overburdened with instruction to the point of being dull. The first known use of “Didactic” was in 1658. A sentence example using “Didactic ” is “She always wants to correct other people because of her didactic nature.” The sentence means that the woman wants to teach other people by correcting them.

21. Dilatory

Dilatory describes a thing or a person that is  “delayed.” It is similar to the word “procrastination.” Dilatory is pronounced as “di-luh-tuh-ree.” Being “dilatory” means not acting quickly enough. Dilatory came from the Anglo-French “dilatorie,” Late Latin “dilatorius,” “differre,” meaning “to postpone.” The first known use of “Dilatory” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Dilatory” is, “The government is dilatory in helping those affected by the typhoon. The sentence means the government was not eager to help the affected citizens. 

22. Dowdy

Dowdy describes something as “boring,” “not attractive or fashionable.” It means that someone or something is not neat and lacks taste. Dowdy is pronounced as “dau-dee.” It is synonymous with the word “shabby.” Dowdy came from the Middle English word “doude,” meaning “unattractive. The first known use of “Dowdy” was in 1676. A sentence example using “Dowdy” is, “Fix yourself up as you look dowdy.” The sentence means that the person looks unattractive so fixing and changing the looks is necessary.

23. Efficacious

Efficacious is defined as “having the power to produce the desired effect.” Efficacious is pronounced as “eh-fuh-kay-shuhs.” Synonyms of Efficacious are “effective,” effectual,” and “efficient.” Efficacious was derived from Middle French “efficace,” meaning “effective,” and Latin words “efficāc-” and “efficāx,” meaning “capable of fulfilling a function, effective.” The first known use of “Efficacious” was in 1528. A sentence example using “Efficacious ” is, “Exercising and eating a balanced meal is highly efficacious in losing weight. The sentence states that an effective way of losing weight is by exercising and eating the right amount of food. 

24. Effulgent

Effulgent describes something “shining brightly.” It means that something shows great happiness or goodness. It is a suitable replacement for words such as “shiny,” “dazzling,” and “bright.” Effulgent is pronounced as “i-ful-jint.” It came from the Latin word “fulgēre,” meaning “to shine.” The first known use of “Effulgent” was in 1667. A sentence example using “Effulgent” is, “My boyfriend gave me an effulgent diamond ring as a birthday gift.” The sentence means that the boyfriend gave the girlfriend a shiny diamond ring. 

25. Egregious

Egregious describes something as “extremely bad,” “egregious behavior,” or “archaic.” It is similar to the word “flagrant,” meaning “conspicuously offensive.” Egregious is pronounced as “uh-gree-juhs.” It came from the Latin word “egregius,” meaning “‘standing out from the flock.” The first known use of “Egregious” was in 1534. A sentence example using “Egregious ” is, “My boyfriend gave me an effulgent diamond ring as a birthday gift.” The employee’s performance was egregious, resulting in him getting fired.” The sentence means that the employee’s terrible performance got them fired. 

26. Endemic

Endemic describes a thing as “belonging or native to a particular people or country.” It is defined as a “characteristic of or prevalent in a certain field, area, or environment.” Endemic is pronounced as “en-deh-muhk.” Endemic is commonly used together with words “corruption,” disease,” and “violence.” It is often used to characterize diseases present in a particular area. It is derived from the Greek word “endēmos,” meaning “‘in population.” It is related to the word “epidemic,” indicating a more or less constant presence in a particular population or area rather than a sudden, severe outbreak within that region or group. Biologists use “endemic” to characterize the plant and animal species that are only found in a given area. The first known use of “Endemic” was in 1759. A sentence example using “Endemic” is, “There is an ongoing endemic disease right now in China.” The sentence means there is a current disease spreading through China. 

27. Equanimous

Equanimous describes someone as “displaying evenness of mind, especially under stress.” It means “even-tempered and balanced.” Equanimous is synonymous with “collected” and “composed.”“Equanimous is pronounced as “uh-kwa-nuh-muhs.” There is no information regarding when “Equanimous” was first used. However, its noun “equanimity” was first started used in 1616. A sentence example using “Equanimous” is, “Her equanimity allowed her to escape the burning building.” The sentence means that the woman stayed calm despite the fire.

28. Execrable

Execrable describes a thing as “very bad” or “terrible.” It is defined as “utterly evil or detestable.” Execrable is pronounced as “ek-suh-kruh-bl.” Execrable is synonymous with “wretched” and commonly used with the word “crime.” It is derived from the Latin word “exsecrari,” meaning “to put under a curse.” The first known use of “Execrable” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Execrable” is, “The influencer saw many execrable comments that made her feel down.” The sentence means many nasty comments the influencer saw online that made the influencer feel bad.

29. Fastidious

Fastidious describes something as “being careful that every detail of something is correct.” It is defined as “not liking things to be dirty or untidy.” Something or someone that is “Fastidious” shows excessive delicacy or care. It means that they have attention to detail and reflect a meticulous, sensitive, or demanding attitude. They have high and often capricious standards and are difficult to please. Fastidious is pronounced as “fa-sti-dee-uhs.” Fastidious comes from the Latin word “fastidium,” meaning “aversion” or “disgust.” Fastidium is the combination of “fastus,” meaning “arrogance,” and “taedium,” indicating “irksomeness” or “disgust.” Fastidious was once defined as “haughty,” “disgusting,” and “disagreeable,” but the word is now most often applied to people who are very meticulous or overly difficult to please. The first known use of “Fastidious” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Fastidious” is, Monica is too fastidious, so she gets angry when someone messes up her place.” The sentence means that Monica always needs to keep the place tidy because of Monica’s neat characteristics. Therefore, when people get the place dirty, Monica gets mad.

30. Feckless

Feckless describes a thing as “weak” or “ineffective.” It means “worthless” or “irresponsible” as well. Feckless is pronounced as “fek-luhs.” The root word “feck” means “majority” or “effect” in Scottish. The term is ultimately an alteration of the Middle English “effect.” It is the opposite of “feckful,” meaning efficient, effective,” “sturdy,” or “powerful.” Feckless is a commonly used English word compared to “feckful.” The first known use of “Feckless” was in 1585. A sentence example using “Feckless” is, “The group got a low grade because of some feckless group members.” The sentence means there are irresponsible members of the group that caused their group grade to suffer.

31. Fecund

Fecund describes a thing or someone as “fruitful in offspring or vegetation.” They are able to produce a lot of children. It means someone that is intellectually productive or inventive to a marked degree as well. They are able to produce new useful things, especially ideas.” Fecund is pronounced as “fee-knd.” Fecund is synonymous with “fruitful” and “fertile.” Fruitful means abundance and implies that the results are desirable. On the other hand, Fertile implies the power to reproduce or assist in reproduction, growth, or development. Fecund means that someone or something has the ability to yield offspring, fruit, or results in abundance or with rapidity. The first known use of “Fecund” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Fecund” is, “The most fecund days of females are 12 to 14 days before their period starts.” The sentence means females are fertile a week to two before their next period starts.

32. Friable

Friable describes a thing as “easily crumbled or pulverized.” It means it is “effortlessly broken up into little fragments.” It means they are easily reduced to a powdered form. Friable is synonymous with “brittle,” “fragile,” and “crisp.” Friable is pronounced as “frai-uh-bl.” It was derived from Middle French or Latin words “friabilis” and “friare,” meaning “to fall apart.” “Friare” is connected to the word “fricare,” “to rub.” The first known use of “Friable” was in 1563. A sentence example using “Friable” is, “Be careful in handling that friable package.” The sentence means that the package is fragile so extra care is necessary for handling it.  

33. Fulsome

Fulsome describes someone as “too generous in praising or thanking somebody.” It means that they are characterized by abundance. generous in amount, extent, or spirit.” Additionally, they are known to “be full and well developed.” It means they are “aesthetically, morally, or typically offensive.” Often, they exceed the bounds of good taste by being excessively complimentary or flattering. Fulsome is pronounced as “ful-sam.” Fulsome was primarily a literary term that describes excessive, insincere praise or flattery in the 19th century. Fulsome has been defined as “abundant, copious,” and “full and well developed” since the early 20th century. It resulted in confusion. A phrase like “fulsome praise,” used today without explaining context, is going to be understood to mean either “abundant praise” or “excessive praise.” The first known use of “Fulsome” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Fulsome” is, “The worker offended her boss with her fulsome compliments as an attempt to get promoted.” The sentence means the worker complimented their boss so much that the boss got offended.

34. Garrulous

Garrulous is defined as “talking a lot, especially about unimportant things.” It means “given to prosy, rambling, or tedious talkativeness.” It means pointlessly or annoyingly talkative. Garrulous is pronounced as “ga-ruh-luhs.” Garrulous is derived from the Latin word “garrīre,” meaning “to chatter, talk rapidly.” The first known use of “Garrulous” was in 1611. A sentence example using “Garrulous” is, “According to the horoscope, Cancers tend to be garrulous.” The sentence means that people that are Cancer are known to be talkative. 

35. Guileless

Guileless is defined as “behaving in a very honest way.” People that are “Guileless” do not know how to trick people. It is synonymous with “innocent” and “naive.” Guileless is pronounced as “gile-luhs.” Guileless was derived from the Middle English word “gile.”The first known use of “Guileless” was in 1616. A sentence example using “Guileless” is, “The guileless student was scammed by a con artist.” The sentence means the student was scammed because of being naive. 

36. Gustatory

Gustatory describes a thing as “relating to or associated with eating.” It is connected with tasting or the sense of taste. Gustatory is pronounced as “guh-stay-tuh-ree.” Gustatory is one of the finite sets of words that describe the senses, such as visual, aural, olfactory, and tactile. Gustatory was derived from the Latin word “gustare,” meaning “to taste.” The first known use of Endemic “Gustatory” was in 1759. A sentence example using “Gustatory” is, “The buffet comprises gustatory foods that guests loved.” The sentence means the buffet offers many foods that guests are allowed to eat.

37. Heuristic

Heuristic is defined as “teaching or education encourages someone to learn by discovering things for themselves.” It involves or serves as an aid to learning, discovery, or problem-solving by experimental and especially trial-and-error methods. It describes something “of or relating to exploratory problem-solving techniques that utilize self-educating techniques, such as the evaluation of feedback to improve performance.” Heuristic is pronounced as “hyuor-ri-stuhk.” It came from the German word “heuristisch,” the Latin word “heuristicus,” and the Greek word “heuriskein,” meaning “to discover.” The first known use of “Heuristic” was in 1821. A sentence example using “Heuristic” is, “The heuristic course taught the students about the mind and behavior of other people.” The sentence means the course’s purpose is to teach students about a specific topic.

38. Histrionic

Histrionic is defined as “behavior that is very emotional and is intended to attract attention in a way that does not seem sincere.” It means “deliberately affected” or “overly dramatic or emotional.” It is commonly used to describe actors, acting, or theater. Histrionic is pronounced as “hi-stree-o-nuhk.” It is derived from the Latin word “histrio,” meaning “actor.” Something that is histrionic tends to remind one of the high drama of stage and screen and is often dramatic and over-the-top. It especially calls to mind the theatrical form known as melodrama, where the plot and physical action, not characterization, are emphasized. But something that is histrionic is not always overdone. Histrionic refers to an actor or describes something related to the theater. It is synonymous with “thespian,” meaning “relating to drama and the theater.” The first known use of “Histrionic” was in 1648. A sentence example using “Histrionic” is, “During the time that our mom died, my sister seems histrionic.” The sentence means that one of the daughters of the deceased mother lacked sincerity when the mother died. 

39. Hubristic

Hubristic describes a thing as “exaggerated pride or self-confidence.” Hubristic is pronounced as “hyoo-bri-stuhk.” It is synonymous with “arrogance,” meaning “rude” or “with an overbearing manner.” The noun form of “Hubristic” is “Hubris,” which has the same meaning. It means “feeling too proud.” “Hubris” is a characteristic of a hero in Ancient Greek that allows them to provoke the wrath of the gods and often a fatal shortcoming that brings about their fall. They overstep the boundaries of their limitations and assume a godlike status, and the gods punish the hero by killing them as a reminder of their mortality. The first known use of Hubristic was in 1884. A sentence example using “Hubristic” is, “He did not study for the exam because of his hubristic attitude, and it got him a failing grade.” The sentence means that the subject did not study for the exam because of overconfidence, which eventually resulted in a failing grade.

40. Incendiary

Incendiary describes a thing as “igniting combustible materials spontaneously.” It is related to or being a weapon, such as a bomb, designed to start fires. Something “incendiary” tends to excite or inflame, like arson. It is something that is scorching and is designed to cause fires. A new meaning of “incendiary” is “to cause strong feelings or violence.” Incendiary is pronounced as “uhn-sen-deeuh-ree.” It came from Latin words “incendiarius,” “incendium,” and “incendere,” meaning “conflagration,” and ”‘set fire to.” The first known use of “Incendiary” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Incendiary” is, “The driver was asked to go to the police station when they saw on the inspection that he was carrying incendiary things in his car.’ The sentence means the driver’s car contains combustible things that made the police suspect that driver.

41. Insidious

Incendiary describes a thing as “igniting combustible materials spontaneously.” It is related to or being a weapon, such as a bomb, designed to start fires. Something “incendiary” tends to excite or inflame, like arson. It is something that is scorching and is designed to cause fires. A new meaning of “incendiary” is “to cause strong feelings or violence.” Insidious was derived from the Latin word “insidiae,” meaning “deceitful,” stealthy,” and “harmful.” The first known use of “Insidious” was in 1545. A sentence example using “Insidious” is, “The insidious event happening to the child frightens his parents.” The sentence means that the child is experiencing a sinister event that made the parents afraid. 

42. Insolent

Insolent is defined as ​”extremely rude and showing a lack of respect.” Someone “insolent” is insultingly contemptuous in speech or conduct. They exhibit boldness or effrontery. Insolent is synonymous with “overbearing” and “impudent.” Insolent is pronounced as “in-suh-luhnt.” It came from the Latin words “in” and “solere,” meaning “not” and “being accustomed,” respectively. Additionally, it came from the Middle English word “insolens,” meaning ‘unaccustomed” and “overbearing.” The first known use of “Insolent” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Insolent” is, “The insolent teenager got in trouble with his parents.” The sentence means that the teenager got in trouble because of a lack of respect towards the parents. 

43. Intransigent

Intransigent describes people as “unwilling to change their opinions or behavior in a way that would be helpful to others.” It is  a refusal to abandon an often extreme position or attitude. Intransigent is synonymous with “uncompromising,” meaning “making no concessions.” Intransigent is pronounced as “in-tran-suh-jnt.” Intransigent was derived from the Spanish word “intransigente,” meaning “uncompromising.” It came from the root word “transigir,” meaning “to compromise.” The prefix “in-” is the Latin word for “not.” The first known use of “Intransigent” was in 1879. A sentence example using “Intransigent” is, “The intransigent customer made it hard for the business to make a sale.” The sentence means that the customer does not change their mind, resulting in the business having a hard time selling its products and services. 

44. Inveterate

Inveterate describes people as “always doing something or enjoying something.” It means “done or felt for a long time and unlikely to change. Inveterate is synonymous with “habitual,” meaning “usual for or typical of somebody or something.” Inveterate is pronounced as “in-veh-tuh-ruht.” It was derived from the Latin words “vetus,” meaning “old,” and “inveterare,” meaning “to age.” Inveterate has meant “long-standing” or simply “old” in the past. Nowadays, inveterate applies to a habit, attitude, or feeling of such a long existence. The first known use of “Inveterate” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Inveterate” is, “He is an inveterate swindler that has damaged a lot of lives.” The sentence means that the subject is a habitual swindler that scammed many people.

45. Invidious

Invidious describes a thing as “of an unpleasant or objectionable nature.” Another meaning of “invidious” is to be likely to offend somebody or make them jealous. Additionally, something or someone “invidious” causes harm or resentment and tends to cause dissatisfaction, hatred, or jealousy. Invidious is synonymous with “obnoxious,” meaning “wanting to be in the same situation as somebody else,” and “envious,” meaning “highly offensive.” Invidious is pronounced as “uhn-vi-dee-uhs.” It was derived from the Latin words “invidia,” meaning “envy,” and “invidēre,” meaning “to look askance at” or “to envy.” However, “invidious” is rarely a synonym for “envious.” The preferred uses are primarily “pejorative,” describing unpleasant things. The first known use of “Invidious” was in 1606. A sentence example using “Invidious” is, “After getting drunk, the customer had exhibited an invidious attitude.” The sentence means that the customer had an unpleasant attitude after being drunk.

46. Irksome

Irksome describes a thing as “tending to irritating or boring.” It means someone or something is ‘annoying” and “tiresome.” Irksome is pronounced as “uhk-sm.” Irksome is synonymous with “tedious,” meaning “annoying” and “boring.” Irksome was derived from the Middle English words “irkesome” and “irksum,” meaning “irritating” and “painful,” respectively. The first known use of “Irksome” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Irksome” is, “The irksome children made me have a headache.” The sentence means that the annoying children caused the other person to have a headache.

47. Jejune

Jejune describes a thing as “devoid of significance or interest.” It means “lacking nutritive value,” “too simple,” or “dull.” Jejune is pronounced as ” juh-joon.” It was derived from the Latin word “jejunus,” meaning “barren,” meaning “incapable of producing offspring.” Jejune is synonymous with “juvenile” and “puerile,” meaning “physiologically immature or undeveloped “ and “silly,” respectively. The first known use of “Jejune” was in 1646. A sentence example using “Jejune” is, “He did not win the art contest because his creation is jejune.” The sentence means that the contestant did not win the contest because the art creation was too simple.   

48. Jocular

Jocular describes something “humorous said or done as a joke.” It means something is funny, and someone is joking or enjoys making people laugh. Jocular means “habitually jolly” in that sense. Jocular is synonymous with “humorous,” meaning “possessing, indicating, or expressive of an ability to be funny.” Jocular is pronounced as “jo-kyuh-luh.” Jocular was derived from the Latin words “jocularis,” “joculus,” and “jocus,” meaning “wordplay.” The first known use of “Jocular” was in 1626. A sentence example using “Jocular” is, “The jocular stand-up comedian never fails to make the audiences laugh.” The sentence means that the stand-up comedian always comes up with a joke that makes the audience laugh.  

49. Judicious

Judicious describes a thing or someone as “careful” and “reasonable.” They show good judgment. Judicious is pronounced as “joo-di-shuhs.” Judicious is commonly used together with the words “mix,” mixture,” and “selection.” Judicious was derived from the Latin word “judicium,” meaning “judgment,” and “judicieux,” meaning “judicial.” “Judicious” was first used in 1591. A sentence example using “Judicious” is, “I cannot deal with you because you are judicious. The sentence means that the subject does not compromise with the unreasonable other person.

50. Lachrymose

Lachrymose describes a thing as “tending to cry easily.” Something that makes someone cry is called “Lachrymose.” Lachrymose is pronounced as “la-kruh-mows.” Lachrymose was derived from the Latin words “lacrimosus” and “lacrima,” meaning “tear.” It typically applies to someone who is moved to tears because of strong emotions or stimulated by feelings. One related adjective was traced back to the 15th century. The related adjective is “lachrymal” or “lacrimal,” meaning “glands that produce tears” or ” marked by tears.” The first known use of “Lachrymose” was in 1727. A sentence example using “Lachrymose” is, “The lachrymose child cried because he got bullied.” The sentence means that the crybaby cried when bullied. 

51. Limpid

Limpid describes a thing as “marked by transparency.” It means that they are clear and straightforward in style. Something “limpid” means that it is serene and untroubled. Limpid is synonymous with “pellucid,” meaning “extremely clear.” Limpid is pronounced as “lim-puhd.” Limpid has been used in English to describe things with pure water’s soft clearness. The aquatic connection is not incidental. Limpid was derived from the Latin word “lympha,” meaning “water.” Lympha is the root word for the English noun “lymph,” meaning “a clear liquid containing white blood cells.” The lymph is the one that maintains the body’s fluid balance and removes bacteria from tissues. The first known use of “Limpid” was in 1598. A sentence example using “Limpid” is, “The limpid bag made it easier to see what is inside of it.” The sentence means that the bag was transparent enough to see everything.  

52. Loquacious

Loquacious describes a person as “talking a lot.” It means that they are full of excessive talk. Loquacious is synonymous with “wordy” and “garrulous.” Loquacious typically means “excessively talkative.” Loquacious is pronounced as “luh-kway-shuhs.” People notice that the word seems poetic and intelligent when they hear “Loquacious.” Poets used “loquacious” soon after it made its first appearance in English in the 17th century. It has been used to describe the chirping of birds and the quiet sounds of flowing water over rocks in a stream. Loquacious was derived from the Latin word “loqui,” meaning “to speak.” Other words descended from “loqui” include colloquial, eloquent, soliloquy, and ventriloquism. The first known use of “Loquacious” was in 1656. A sentence example using “Loquacious” is “His over­indulgence in beer that made him far too loquacious with a girl at the bar.” The sentence means the drunk guy was too talkative with the girl at the bar.

53. Luminous

Luminous describes a thing as “emitting or reflecting usually steady, suffused, or glowing light.” It is defined as “relating to light” or “bathed in or exposed to a light.” Luminous is pronounced as “loo-muh-nuhs.” Luminous is synonymous with “radiant,” “shining,” “glowing,” and “lustrous.” These adjectives describe something that does not exactly glow, such as a face, a performance, or a poem. On the contrary, signs on gas stations and diners are called “luminous.” The first known use of “Endemic” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Luminous” is, “Your luminous face is what made me fall in love with you in the first place.” The sentence means that the glowing face is the lovable feature of the person.  

54. Mannered

Mannered describes a person as “trying to impress people by being formal and not natural. It means that they have a certain type of manners.” Additionally, it means that they have manners of a specified kind or display a particular manner. Moreover, someone that is “Mannered” has an artificial or stilted character. Mannered is pronounced as “ma-nuhd.” The first known use of “Mannered” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Mannered” is, “My parents liked my well-mannered girlfriend.” The sentence means that the girlfriend has good characteristics and attitude. 

55. Mendacious

Mendacious describes a person as “not telling the truth given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth.” Mendacious is pronounced as ” men-day-shuhs.” “Mendacious” is synonymous with “Lying,” meaning “saying untrue statements.” The two words are not interchangeable despite their similar meanings. “Mendacious” is more formal and literary, suggesting a deception harmless enough to be considered somewhat bland. “Lying” is more blunt, accusatory, and often confrontational. It is used more in casual conversation. The sentence is going to sound professional if “Mendacious.” The two sentences meant the same thing. The only difference is how the sentence sounds. “Mendacious” implies “habitual untruthfulness,” whereas “lying” identifies specific “dishonesty instances.” The first known use of “Mendacious” was in 1616. A sentence example using “Mendacious” is, “She broke up with her mendacious boyfriend.” The sentence means that the girl broke up with a boyfriend that is constantly.

56. Meretricious

Meretricious describes a person as “relating to a prostitute.” They are tawdrily and falsely attractive superficially. Additionally, a thing that is “meretricious” means it is attractive but has no particular value. Meretricious is pronounced as “meh-ruh-tri-shuhs.” Meretricious was derived from the Latin word “merēre,” meaning “to earn, gain, or deserve.” “Merēre” has the same origin as other English words, such as “merit,” meritorious,” and “emeritus.” However, the other three words have different meanings compared to “Meretricious” despite the same origin. “Merit” and “Meritorious” are defined as the “quality of being good” or “deserving praise and reward.” On the other hand, “emeritus” is used before or after a title to indicate that the person is honorable. These words suggest a degree of honor or esteem. The reason why the definition of the three words differs from “Meretricious” is that “merēre” is at the root of the Latin word “meretrix.” The word “meretrix” means “prostitute.” The first known use of “Meretricious” was in 1759. Additionally, “Meretricious” indicates things that are superficially attractive but have little or no value at all. A sentence example using “Meretricious” is, “The girl’s meretricious dress is inappropriate for the event.” The sentence means the dress is like that of a prostitute, which is inappropriate. 

57. Minatory

Minatory describes a person as “presenting harm.”  It is defined as a “characteristic of or prevalent in a certain field, area, or environment.” It is somehow related to the bull-headed, people-eating monster in Crete, Minotaur, in Greek Mythology. However, the most related word to “Minatory” is “Menace,” meaning “showing the intention of inflicting harm.” Minatory is pronounced as “mi-nuh-taw-ree.” Minatory was derived from the Late Latin word “minatorius,” and “minax,” meaning “threatening.” The first known use of “Minatory” was in 1532. A sentence example using “Minatory” is, “I got scared when she looked at me with minatory eyes.” The sentence means that the eyes are threatening, which makes the speaker scared.” 

58. Mordant

Mordant describes a thing as “biting and caustic in thought, manner, or style.” It means “critical and unkind, but funny.”  Mordant is pronounced as “maw-dnt.” Mordant is synonymous with “sarcastic” and “incisive.” Sarcastic means “using words opposite to the intended meaning to make fun of someone.” Incisive means “having a clear thought of what is important.” Mordant was derived from the Middle French and Latin word “mordēre,” meaning “to bite.” The first known use of “Mordant” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Mordant” is “The writer was famous for her mordant humor in her novels.” The sentence means the writer has novels that contain sarcastic humor.

59. Munificent

Munificent describes a thing as “liberal in giving.” Someone “munificent” means they are “generous.” Munificent is pronounced as “myoo-ni-fuh-snt.” It was derived from the Latin word “munificus,” meaning “generous.” “Munificus,” in return, came from the Latin word “munus,” denoting “offering.” The first known use of “Munificent” was in 1565. A sentence example using “Munificent” is, “I contributed a munificent money to the charity.” The sentence means the speaker has given ample money to a charity.” 

60. Nefarious

Nefarious describes a thing as “flagrantly wicked” or “impious.” It is defined as a “characteristic of or prevalent in a certain field, area, or environment.” Nefarious is synonymous with “evil,” meaning “enjoying harming others.” Nefarious is pronounced as “nuh-feuh-ree-uhs.” It was derived from the Latin word “nefas,” meaning “crime.” The first known use of “Nefarious” was in 1609. A sentence example using “Nefarious” is, “I’m afraid that he has a nefarious intent.” The sentence means the guy has an evil intent to the speaker.

61. Noxious

Noxious describes a thing as “physically harmful” or “destructive to living beings.” It means “constituting a harmful influence on the mind or behavior.” Noxious is pronounced as “nok-shuhs.” It was derived from the Latin word “noxius,” meaning “guilty,” “delinquent,” “harmful,” or “injurious.” The first known use of “Noxious” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using Noxious is, “COVID-19 has a noxious effect on the citizens of the country.” The sentence means the pandemic has a harmful effect on the health of the country’s citizens.

62. Obtuse

Obtuse describes a person as “unwilling to understand something.” Another meaning of “obtuse” is “an angle that exceeds 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees.” The meaning is used to describe a thing in geometry. Obtuse is pronounced as “aab-toos.” It is synonymous with “slow-witted,” meaning “slow to understand.” The first known use of “Obtuse” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using Obtuse is “The student was obtuse and did not understand the lesson.” The sentence means the student is a slow learner.

63. Parsimonious

Parsimonious describes a person as “not willing to spend money.” They are frugal to the point of stinginess. Parsimonious usually suggests an extreme frugality that borders on stinginess. Parsimonious is pronounced as “paar-suh-mow-nee-uhs.” It is synonymous with “sparing” and “restrained,” meaning “careful to use” and “showing calm control,” respectively. Additionally, other words that are more closely related to “Parsimonious” are “stingy” and “penurious.” “Stingy” implies a marked lack of generosity. “Penurious” implies frugality that gives an appearance of actual poverty. The first known use of “Parsimonious” was in 1598. A sentence example using Parsimonious is, “The parsimonious guy does not want to pay a single penny for their date.” The sentence means the guy is frugal and does not want to pay for the day. 

64. Pendulous

Pendulous describes a thing as “hanging down loosely and moving from side to side.” It was derived from the Latin word “pendulus,” meaning “hanging down.” It is synonymous with “drooping” and “dangling.” The pronunciation of “Pendulous” is “pen-joo-luhs.” The first known use of Pendulous was in 1605. A sentence example using “Pendulous” is “The pendulous earrings made you look stunning.” The sentence means the dangling earrings made the person look beautiful. 

65. Pernicious

Pernicious describes a thing as “highly injurious or destructive.” It is synonymous with “deadly” and “wicked.” However, something that is “pernicious” is not easily noticeable. It was derived from the Latin word “perniciosus,” meaning “violent death” and “destructive.” The first known use of “Pernicious” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Pernicious” is, “She never realized she had a pernicious disease not until she got examined.” The sentence means that the person only found out about a deadly disease after getting examined. 

66. Pervasive

Pervasive describes a thing as “existing or spreading through a part of something.” It is synonymous with “prevalent” and “penetrating,” meaning “common at a particular place or time” and “something uncomfortable,” respectively. Pervasive was derived from the Latin word “pervadere,” meaning “to go through” or “to go.” The first known use of ‘Pervasive” was in 1750. A sentence example of “Pervasive” is, “Smoking and drinking are pervasive among teenagers.” The sentence means smoking and drinking are common among teenagers.

67. Petulant

Petulant describes a thing as ‘behaving angrily” or “rude in speech or behavior.” It is characterized by unpredictable ill humor. It is synonymous with “peevish,” meaning “easily annoyed.” Petulant was derived from the Latin word “petere,” meaning “to attack.” Petulant is pronounced as “peh-chuh-luhnt.” The first known use of “Petulant” was in 1598. A sentence example using “Petulant” is, “She was petulant because she was not invited to her sister’s birthday celebration.” The sentence means the subject was angry for not being invited to the celebration. 

68. Platitudinous

Platitudinous describes a thing as “uninteresting because it has been repeated many times before.” It is generally used to describe a “comment” or a “statement.” Platitudinous is synonymous with “cliched” and “overused.” Platitudinous is pronounced as “plae-ti-tju-dines.” The first known use of “Platitudinous” was in 1853. A sentence example using “Platitudinous” is, “The panelists all made the same platitudinous feedback about the thesis paper.” The sentence means the panelists made the same comment regarding the thesis of the students.

69. Precipitate

Precipitate is described as “an act of throwing violently.” Additionally, it means “to throw down” or “to bring about suddenly.” It means that something bad is happening untimely. It is synonymous with “cause” or “provoke.” The word “precipitate” is typically used in Science to describe a vapor turning into a liquid. Precipitate is pronounced as “pri-sip-uh-tuht.” It was derived from the Latin words “praecipitatus” and “praecipitare,” meaning “to fall suddenly.” A sentence example using Precipitate is, ‘The father gave a precipitate resignation from his work.” The sentence means the father gave a sudden resignation from work. 

70. Propitious

 Propitious describes something as “favorably good” or “being a pleasing omen.” Something “propitious” means it is “likely to deliver a great outcome.” Propitious is synonymous with “favorable,” “lucky,” and “promising.” Propitious was derived from the Latin word “propitius,” meaning “toward a happy outcome.” Propitious is pronounced as “pruh-pi-shuhs.” The first known use of “Propitious” was in the 5th century. A sentence example using “Propitious” is, “I don’t think that it is the propitious time to invest now since I just left my job. The sentence means the speaker does not think it is the best time to make an investment after losing a job.

71. Puckish

Puckish describes someone as “enjoying playing tricks on other people. It is synonymous with “impish” and “whimsical,” meaning “lack of respect for somebody” and “unusual and funny.” Puckish was derived from the Middle English and Old English words “puke” and “pūca,” meaning “devil.” Puckish is pronounced as “puh-kuhsh.” The first known use of ‘Puckish” was in 1831. A sentence example using “Puckish” is, “His puckish smile on his face made him look suspicious.” The sentence means that the guy was suspicious because of an unusual smile on their face.

72. Querulous

Querulous describes someone as “habitually complaining.” It means that someone is showing that they are “annoyed.” Querulous is synonymous with “petulant” and “pettish.” Querulous is pronounced as “kweh-ruh-luhs.” It was derived from the Middle English word “querelose,” an adaptation of the Latin word “querulus.” Querulus, in return, was derived from the Latin word “queri,” meaning “to complain.” “Queri” is the origin of the words “quarrel” and “quarrelsome.” The first known use of “Querulous” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Querulous” is, “The querulous grandchildren made their grandparents mad.” The sentence means the grandchildren were always complaining, making the grandparents mad about it.

73. Quiescent

Quiescent describes something as “quiet” or “not active.” Quiescent, in medical terms, is used to indicate something as “developing.” It is typically used to describe a disease that is not showing any pain or symptoms but is developing. Quiescent is pronounced as “kwee-eh-snt.” It was derived from the Latin words “quiēscens” and “quiēscere,” meaning “to repose,” “fall asleep,” “rest,” and “be quiet,” Additionally, it is a derivative of an Indo-European base word “quiē”, meaning “have a rest.” The first known use of “Quiescent” was in 1605. A sentence example using “Quiescent” is, “The pilot class in the university was strangely quiescent.” The sentence means the students of the class are oddly quiet.

74. Rebarbative

Rebarbative describes something or someone as “not attractive” or “causing strong dislike.” It is synonymous with “repellent” and irritating,” meaning “very unpleasant” and “annoying.” Rebarbative is pronounced as ree-baar-buh-tiv.” It was derived from the Latin word “barba,” meaning “beard.” The Latin word for “beard” is the origin of “rebarbative” because beards are known to be irritating and scratchy. “Barba” is the origin word of “barbed” as well. “Barbed” is used to describe something that has a point curved backward. Something that is “barbed” makes it repellent to be touched. The first known use of “Rebarbative” was in 1892. A sentence example using “Rebarbative” is, “I broke up with him because he started to become rebarbative.  The sentence means that the boyfriend became annoying, resulting in a breakup.

75. Recalcitrant

Recalcitrant describes someone as “defiant of authority” or “unwilling to obey instructions.” They are difficult to manage or operate. Recalcitrant, in medical terms, is used to describe someone as “not responsive to treatment.” It is synonymous with “resistant,” “uncooperative,” and “rebellious.” Recalcitrant is pronounced as “ruh-kal-suh-truhnt.” It was derived from the Latin word “recalcitrare,” meaning “to be stubbornly disobedient.” The first known use of “Recalcitrant” was in 1843. A sentence example using “Recalcitrant” is, “The recalcitrant offender did not want to pay for the hassle fee, despite all the changes made to accommodate him. The sentence means the offender does not want to cooperate despite all the changes made in favor of them. 

76. Redolent

Redolent describes something as “making you think of the thing mentioned.” Additionally, it means that something is “full of a specified fragrance” or “smelling strong.” It has multiple synonyms that differ from whichever definition it holds. A few of its synonyms are “reminiscent” and “aromatic.” The two words hold two different meanings but are both synonymous with “Redolent.” Redolent is pronounced as “reh-duh-luhnt.” It was derived from the Latin word “olēre,” meaning “to smell.” The first known use of “Redolent” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Redolent” is, “I love going to Lush because it is redolent of soaps.” The sentence means that the Lush shop smelled like soap, making the subject love going there.

77. Rhadamanthine

Rhadamanthine describes a person as “precisely rigid” or “just.” Someone that is “rhadamanthine” is uncompromising. It came from “Rhadamanthus,” an underworld judge in Greek Mythology. Rhadamanthus is known for their stringent judgment. Rhadamanthine is pronounced as “ra-duh-man-thn.” The first known use of “Rhadamanthine” was in 1659. A sentence example using “Rhadamanthine” is, “My rhadamanthine parents did not allow me to sleepover at my friends.” The sentence means that the strict parents do not allow their child to sleep over at their friend’s place.

78. Risible

Risible describes something or someone as “deserving to be laughed at rather than taken seriously.” It means that they cause laughter or are associated with laughter. Risible is synonymous with “laughable,” “ridiculous,” and “amusing.” “Risible” is used to describe the muscles on the face responsible for laughing and smiling. Risible is pronounced as “ri-zuh-bl.” It was derived from the Latin words “ridēre,” “risibilis,” and “risus,” meaning “to laugh.” The first known use of “Risible” was in 1557. A sentence example using “Risible” is, “My boyfriend tried a risible attempt to lighten up my mood.” The sentence means that the boyfriend made a funny gesture to make the girlfriend laugh. 

79. Ruminative

Ruminative is defined as “to go over in mind repeatedly” and “often casually or slowly to chew repeatedly for an extended period.” Ruminative describes a person as “tending to think deeply and carefully about things.” It was derived from the Latin words “ruminari,” “rumen,” and “ruminatus,” meaning “chewing something over slowly.” Ruminative is pronounced as “roo-muh-nay-tuhv.” The first known use of “Ruminative” was in 1533. A sentence example using “Ruminative” is, “You have to be ruminative to avoid committing mistakes.” The sentence means that things must be thought about multiple times to avoid making mistakes.

80. Sagacious

Sagacious describes a person as “of keen and farsighted penetration and judgment.” They are showing good judgment and understanding. Sagacious is synonymous with “discerning” and “obsolete.” Sagacious was used to refer to sight, taste, and smell before. Sagacious was derived from the Latin words “sagac,” “sagax,” “sagire,” and “sagus,” meaning “to sense keenly.” It is pronounced as “suh-gay-shuhs.” The first known use of “Sagacious” was in 1607. It was used by an author named Edward Topsell. Sagacious is now used to describe someone as having “keen judgment.” A sentence example using “Sagacious” is, “The sagacious man always thinks before he acts.” The sentence means that the man has always thought of the consequences of the actions because of having good judgment. 

81. Salubrious

Salubrious describe a place as “pleasant to live in.” It means that it is a clean and healthy place. Additionally, “salubrious” is used to describe a thing that is “favorable to or promoting health or well-being.” Salubrious is synonymous with “healthy” and “beneficial.” It is pronounced as “suh-loo-bree-uhs.” It was derived from the Latin words “salubris” and “salvus,” meaning “safe.” The first known use of ‘Salubrious” was in 1547. A sentence example using “Salubrious” is, “I love living in the country because of its salubrious air and surroundings.” The sentence means that the country has clean air and surroundings, which makes it a suitable place to live in. 

82. Sartorial

Sartorial describes how clothes are made. It is defined as “relating to a tailor or tailored clothes.” It is commonly used for men’s clothes. Sartorial was derived from the Latin words “sartor” and “sarcire,” meaning “tailor” and “to patch,” respectively. Sartorial is pronounced as “saar-taw-ree-uhl.” The first known use of “Sartorial” was in 1823. A sentence example using “Sartorial” is, “Your poor sartorial preference got you dumped.” The sentence means that the poor fashion sense of the person got them rejected by another.

83. Sclerotic

Sclerotic describes someone as “losing the ability to change and adapt.” Sclerotic, in medical terms, is defined as “becoming hard because of a medical condition.” Its synonyms differ based on what definition it holds. Sclerotic is synonymous with “disapproving” and “disabled.” Sclerotic is pronounced as “sklr-aa-tuhk.” It was derived from the Latin and Greek words “sclerotica,” “sklērōtos,” and “sklēroun,” meaning “to harden.” The first known use of “Sclerotic” was in 1543. A sentence example using “Sclerotic” is, “My sclerotic health made me sicker because of COVID-19.” The sentence means that the subject has poor health conditions and does not have the ability to adapt to the ongoing pandemic. 

84. Serpentine

Serpentine describes something or someone as “subtly wily or tempting.” It means that something is “winding or turning one way and another, resembling a snake.” A snake is known for its curving and winding movements when moving around. One example is a serpentine road that passes through Spain and France. Serpentine is pronounced as “sur-puhn-teen.” It was derived from Anglo-French and Latin words “serpentin,” “serpentinus,” and “serpens,” meaning “creeping.”  The first known use of “Serpentine” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Serpentine” is, “Let’s take a trip to the serpentine ocean.” The sentence means that the ocean has curves.

85. Spasmodic

Spasmodic describes something as “​happening suddenly for short time.” It describes a feeling as “outbursts of emotional excitement.” Spasmodic is synonymous with “excitable” and “intermittent.” Spasmodic is pronounced as “spaz-maa-duhk.” It was derived from the Latin and Greek words “spasmodicus,” “spasmōdēs,” and “spasmos,” meaning “pull.” The first known use of “Spasmodic” was in 1681. A sentence example using “Spasmodic,” I tried making spasmodic try to lose weight. The sentence means that the subject only made inconsistent tries to lose a few pounds. 

86. Strident

Strident describes something as “having a loud, rough and unpleasant sound.” Additionally, it means that something is “commanding attention by a loud or obtrusive quality.” It describes a person as “aggressive” and “determined.” Strident is pronounced as “strai·dnt.” It was derived from the Latin words “stridens” and “stridere,” meaning “creaking.” The first known use of ‘Strident” was in 1656. A sentence example using ”Strident“ is, The employee becomes increasingly strident, resulting in getting fired. The sentence means that the employee has become aggressive and lost their job. 

87. Taciturn

Taciturn describes someone as “temperamentally disinclined to talk.” Someone that is “taciturn” tends not to say very much and comes off unfriendly. Taciturn is pronounced as “ta-suh-trn.” It was derived from the Latin words “taciturnus,” “tacitus,” and “tacere,” meaning “be silent.” The first known use of “Taciturn” was in 1734. A sentence example using “Taciturn” is, “I am a taciturn introvert, and I am afraid that I will not make any friends at my new school.” The sentence means that the student does not talk much and worries about making new friends.

88. Tenacious

Tenacious describes something or someone as “does not stop holding something or give up something easily.” It means that something is persistent in adhering to something. Tenacious is synonymous with “determined” and “cohesive,” meaning “having made a definite decision” and “forming a united whole,” respectively. Tenacious is pronounced as “tuh-nay-shuhs.” It was derived from the Latin word “tenax,” meaning “tending to hold fast.” Additionally, it came from other Latin words “tenāc” and “tenēre,” meaning “holding fast, clinging, persistent” and “to hold, occupy, possess,” respectively. The first known use of “Tenacious” was in 1607. A sentence example using  “Tenacious” is “She was very tenacious to get promoted at her company.” The sentence means that the employee is determined to get promoted at work.

89. Tremulous

Tremulous describes something as “slightly shaking because you are nervous.” Something that is “tremulous” causes someone to shake. Tremulous is synonymous with “piercing” and “incisive.” It is pronounced as “treh-myuh-luhs.” Tremulous was derived from the Latin words “tremulus” and “tremere,” meaning “tremble.” The first known use of “Tremulous” was in the 17th century. An example sentence using “Tremulous” is, “My Tremulous voice made my speech awkward.” The sentence means that the speaker’s voice during the speech was trembling, making the speech embarrassing. 

90. Trenchant

Trenchant describes something as “vigorously effective and articulate.” It is commonly used to describe a remark or criticism as “expressed strongly and effectively, in a clear way.”  Trenchant is synonymous with “keen,” “sharp,” “caustic,” “clear-cut,” and “distinct.” Trenchant is pronounced as “tren-chnt.” It was derived from the Latin words “trenchier” and “truncare,” meaning “cutting” and “to maim,” respectively. The first known use of “Trenchant” was in the 14th century. A sentence example using “Trenchant” is, “The students got overwhelmed with the trenchant feedback of their professor regarding their assignments.” The sentence means that the students were dazzled by the sharp remarks their professor left for their assignments. 

91. Turbulent

Turbulent describes something as “causing unrest, violence, or disturbance.” Something that is “turbulent” means there is a lot of sudden change, trouble, argument, and violence. Turbulent is synonymous with “tempestuous,” meaning “full of extreme emotions.” Turbulent is pronounced as “tur-byuh-luhnt.” Most of the time, “turbulent” is heard during a flight. It was derived from the Latin words “turbulentus” and “turba,” meaning “full of commotion or confusion. The first known use of “Turbulent” was in 1538. A sentence example using “Turbulent” is, “A turbulent flight caused people to fear for their lives.” The sentence means that the sudden disturbance during the flight made the passengers afraid.

92. Turgid

Turgid describes a language or writing as “boring, complicated, and difficult to understand.” Another meaning of “turgid” is “swollen because of containing too much water.” Turgid is synonymous with “bloated,” “puffed,” and “blown.” It is pronounced as “tur-juhd.” Turgid was derived from the Latin words “turgidus” and “turgere,” meaning “to swell.” The first known use of “Turgid” was in 1620. A sentence example using “Turgid” is, “Change your turgid speech to avoid boring out your audiences.” The sentence means that one must change their complicated speech so that the audience is not going to get bored. 

93. Ubiquitous

Ubiquitous describes something as “existing or being everywhere at the same time.” It means that something is constantly encountered. Something that is “ubiquitous” means that it seems to be everywhere or in several places at the same time. It is very common, in short. Ubiquitous is synonymous with “widespread.” Ubiquitous is pronounced as “yoo-bi-kwuh-tuhs.” It was derived from the Latin words “ubique” and “ubi,” meaning “everywhere” and “where,” respectively. The first known use of “Ubiquitous” was in 1772. Ubiquitous comes to us from the noun ubiquity, meaning A sentence example using “Ubiquitous” is, “The mobile app TikTok has become increasingly ubiquitous with teenage users.” The sentence means that TikTok is very common with teenage mobile users. 

94. Uxorious

Uxorious describes someone, specifically a husband, as “excessively fond of or submissive to a wife.” It is synonymous with “dominated.” Uxorious is pronounced as “uhk-saw-ree-uhs.” It was derived from the Latin word “uxor,” meaning “wife.” The first known use of “Uxorious” was in 1598. A sentence example using “Uxorious” is, “The woman married an uxorious husband.” The sentence means that the wife has a husband who always follows what the wife wants.”

95. Verdant

Verdant describes something with green in tint or color. It is commonly used to describe a thing that is fresh and green, such as a plant. Verdant  is synonymous with “leafy” and “grassy.” It is pronounced as “vur-dnt.” Verdant was derived from the Old French and Latin words “verdeant,” “vert,” “verdoier,” and “viridis,” meaning “green.” Additionally, it comes from the Old French word “vert,” meaning “green.” The first known use of “Verdant” was in 1581. A sentence example using Verdant is, “My mom loves to decorate our house with verdant flowers and plants. The sentence means the mother wants to put green and leafy plants at home. 

96. Voluble

Voluble describes something as “easily rolling” or “turning.” It describes something or someone as “talking a lot, and with enthusiasm, about a subject.” They are expressive in many words. Voluble is synonymous with “talkative” and “loquacious.” It is pronounced as “vaa·lyuh·bl.” Voluble was derived from the French and Latin words “volubilis” and “volvere,” meaning “to roll.” The first known use of “Voluble” was in 1581. A sentence example using “Voluble” is, “I find your voluble attitude annoying.” The sentence means that the talkative attitude is bothersome.

97. Voracious

Voracious describes someone as “having a huge appetite” or “excessively eager.” Another meaning of “voracious” is that a person wants to know more new information or knowledge. Voracious is synonymous with “gluttonous” and “greedy.” It is pronounced as “vaw-ray-shuhs.” Voracious was derived from the Latin words “vorax” and “vorac,” meaning “devour.” The first known use of “Voracious” was in 1635. A sentence example using “Voracious” is, “Being a voracious lady is a kind of a turn-off for some guys.” The sentence means that a gluttonous lady is going to turn-off guys. 

98. Wheedling

Wheedling describes something or someone as “to influence or entice by soft words or flattery.” It means they are persuasive by saying nice things about something or someone. Wheedling is pronounced as “wee-duh-luhng.” It was derived from the German words “wedeln” and “wedel,” meaning “cringe” and “tail,” respectively. The first known use of “Wheedling” was in 1661. A sentence example using “Wheedling” is, “His wheedling words made the girlfriend forgive him.” The sentence means that the flattery words allowed the girlfriend to forgive the boyfriend. 

99. Withering

Withering describes something as “acting or serving to cut down or destroy.” Another meaning of “withering” is a look or remark intended to make somebody feel silly or ashamed. Withering is synonymous with “devastating.” It is pronounced as “wi-thr-uhng.” Withering’s origin is unknown. The first known use of “Withering” was in 1579. An example sentence using “Withering” is, “I gave my friend a withering remark about her project.” The sentence means the subject has an embarrassing remark about a friend’s project.

100. Zealous

Zealous describes something or someone as “​showing great energy and enthusiasm for something.” It is synonymous with “committed” and “dedicated.” Zealous is pronounced as “zeh-luhs.” It was derived from the Latin word “zelus,” meaning “jealousy.” The first known use of “Zealous” was in the 15th century. A sentence example using “Zealous” is, “I was zealous about finishing the project early.” The sentence means that the subject was committed to finishing the project as soon as possible.

What are the reasons for the existence of Exquisite Adjectives?

Listed below are the reasons for the existence of Exquisite Adjectives.

  • Professionalism: Exquisite Adjectives add professionalism to the content because the adjectives are not normal. Contents containing exquisite articles exhibit professionalism because most of these are known by professionals that are very well-educated in the English language. Content writers are going to sound professional and experts in that sense.
  • Modification: Exquisite Adjectives describe and modify nouns and pronouns just like any other normal adjectives. It gives more meaning to the sentence because the readers are going to know what kind of nouns or pronouns are being discussed.
  • Enrichment: Exquisite Adjectives enrich the sentence because it provides more information about what is being discussed in the sentence. It makes a dull, plain sentence into an entertaining and flowery one. 

Do Exquisite Adjectives change from the United States to Great Britain?

No, Exquisite Adjectives do not change from the United States to Great Britain. Some American English and British English words vary in their spellings despite having the same meaning. Some examples with the same definition but different spellings are color vs. colour, labeled vs. labelled, and judgment or judgement. They vary mainly because French and German influence British English words. British English words were simplified by Noah Webster. The words are now called American English words. Two spelling versions of English words were used depending on the writer’s or speaker’s location. 

Do Exquisite Adjectives affect Search Engine Optimization?

Yes, Exquisite Adjectives affect Search Engine Optimization (SEO) mainly because they affect the query based on relevance. SEO pertains to enhancing a company’s landing page by increasing its visibility when users search for products and services related to the company. The company’s visibility is enhanced through writing and publishing content on the landing page. Specific keywords and other words must be considered when writing content for the company to ensure that it generates traffic to the website. One of these keywords and words is Exquisite Adjectives. They are Stop words that ensure that the sentence makes sense. Stop words such as articles, prepositions, adjectives, conjunctions, and pronouns were important back in the day when Google was not updated yet. The usage of stop words is essential mainly because adding and removing these words to the search generates different results. However, stop words were eliminated when Google searched for the user’s query. The reason for the change is Google’s Hummingbird update. Nonetheless, stop words, such as exquisite adjectives, are essential to Search Engine Optimization (SEO). The success of SEO is measured through various things, such as Organic Traffic, Keyword ranking, SERP Visibility, Click-Through-Rate (CTR), and Bounce Rate. The quality of the content does not only depend on the keywords of the content that aid in ranking the content on search engines. The landing page’s content must keep the readers entertained by using certain words, such as adjectives, to avoid bounce rates and increase CTR. Additionally, there are certain adjectives that must always be used along with specific nouns. It is called relevance in SEO. Google gives a predictive query when a user searches on the engine. For example, typing “best” on the Google search engine generates “best horror movies,” and “best movies on Netflix.” It means that the adjective “best” is typically accompanied by the word or attribute “movie.” On that note, adjectives affect the search query that is generated by Google when a user searches for one. 

Do Exquisite Adjectives affect User Experience?

Yes, Exquisite Adjectives affect User Experience (UX). UX deals with having a deep understanding of readers, what they need, their values, abilities, and limitations. The User Experience (UX) is influenced by six factors, namely useful, usable, desirable, findable, accessible, and credible. First, being useful means that the landing page’s contents are original and plagiarism-free. Second, the landing page must be easy to navigate. Third, the design and elements of the website must trigger emotion and appreciation. Fourth, the content of the landing page is located easily. Fifth, the content must be accessible to all kinds of readers and users. Lastly, the company must exhibit credibility that makes the readers trust them. One way to execute all of these factors is to use the appropriate and relevant words to the content. Grammatical errors like incorrect spelling and usage of words in writing change what authors want to convey unintentionally. The sentence is going to convey a different meaning to the reader in instances where a word is misused in a sentence. Additionally, a word with the wrong spelling conveys unprofessionalism. Moreover, incorrect grammar disturbs the flow of one’s writing as it affects the user experience of a reader and causes misinformation. It gives the impression that the author is not knowledgeable, skillful, or credible enough to write high-quality content. Quality content matters in Search Engine Optimization (SEO). Most websites that rank top contain quality written articles. Poorly written articles with misspelled and misused words are going to hurt a website. According to surveys conducted by some agencies, on average, 59% of consumers would not buy from an online shopping site with bad spelling and poor grammar.  

How do Content Writers use Exquisite Adjectives words in English?

Content Writers use Exquisite Adjectives before a noun, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, and other adjectives to describe or modify them. Exquisite Adjectives differ from common adjectives mainly because Exquisite ones are not commonly used by people. However, they help build expertise. Additionally, exquisite adjectives are used in content writing instead of normal adjectives to sound more professional. They make the content sound poetic or diplomatic because the Exquisite adjectives are not commonly used on a daily basis. People that are using them are going to exhibit mastery of the English language.

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