73 Most Difficult Words in English

There are numerous difficult words in English. Knowing them is essential in improving one’s communication, and writing skills. Difficult English words are certain words that are hard to read, spell, write, and understand. A good vocabulary makes it easier to communicate, and interact with others. Knowing difficult English words helps an individual to express themselves better. It makes one’s thoughts more accurate. One needs more than a definition to understand a word’s meaning. The word must be seen in how it was used in a sentence.  Seeing a word within a sentence’s context helps someone understand it better and how to use it correctly. English has numerous tricky words. It becomes impossible to remember all these words, particularly the difficult ones. Consistent studying and learning enable one to identify difficult words in English. Reading helps a lot in familiarizing one’s self with words that are new, and unfamiliar. 

People sometimes avoid using difficult English words in daily conversations, for fear of being misunderstood. However, the only way to be more familiar with these difficult words is by using them regularly. Using difficult English words sharpens the mind and improves communication skills. The only way to understand complex English words is by facing them. Do not skip a paragraph that contains a difficult word when reading. Learn and understand its meaning instead. Constant reading makes a person gets exposed to a variety of English words, particularly the difficult ones. Difficult English words are challenging for many people because they do not encounter them regularly. The best way to understand the meaning of difficult words in English is by looking up their definition in the Dictionary.

Listed below are five of the Most Difficult Words in English.

  • Belie: The word “belie” means to give a false representation. “Belie” originated from Middle English “belyen”, which means “to lie around.” “Belie” works in a sentence as a transitive verb.
  • Arrant: The meaning of the word “arrant” is wholly, or complete. “Arrant” originated from the Old French “errant,” the present participle of “errer”, which means “to walk.”
  • Untoward: The meaning of “untoward” is inconvenient. “Untoward” originated from the Old English “un” meaning “not.” The word “toward” was derived from Old English “toward,” which means “in the direction of. ”Untoward’ works as either a noun or an adjective in a sentence.
  • Byzantine: The meaning of “Byzantine” is intricate, or complex.  “Byzantine” originated from the late Latin “byzantinus”, from Byzantium. “Untoward’ works as either a noun or an adjective in a sentence.
  • Conciliate: The meaning of “conciliate” is to make peace with. “Conciliate” originated from the Latin “conciliatus”, the past participle of “conciliare “to bring together, unite in feelings.” 
Contents of the Article show

1. Belie

The word “Belie” comes from Middle English “belyen” or “beliggen.” Old English “belican” or  “bilicgan” means (to lie around, surround, hedge in, or encompass). “Belie” means to show something false or hide something, such as an emotion. Contradict is one synonym for the word “belie.” The term “approve” is the antonym for “belie.” “Belie” is used in a sentence as a transitive verb.  An example sentence of “belie.” “Her cheerful appearance belies her feelings.” The word “belie” was used to describe something that is not true, which pertains to feelings.  “Belie” is among the difficult words in English because it is not commonly used by many. 

2. Arrant 

‘“Arrant” means extreme, or being notorious without moderation. The word “Arrant” comes from a variant of errant, from Middle English “erarunt,” from Anglo-Norman “erraunt,” from Old French errant, the present participle of “errer” (“to walk”). Although arrant is a variant of errant, their modern meanings have diverged. “Arrant” is used in the sense of “complete; downright, while errant means “roving around.” The synonym of “arrant” is complete. The antonym o the word ‘arrant” is “suspicious.” An example sentence of “arrant.” “All the rumors being spread about Kim are nothing but arrant.” “Arrant” is used in a sentence as an adjective to say how bad something is. “Arrant” is one of the most difficult words in English. It is not an easy and common word that appears regularly. 

3. Untoward 

“Untoward” means improper or unseemly. It has enjoyed this meaning since the early 1520s. The origin of the word “untoward” comes from the prefix of negotiation, Old English “un.” From Proto-Germanic “un,” from PIE “n” (source of Sanskrit a-, an- “not,” Greek a-, an-, Old Irish an-, Latin in-), combining form of PIE root “ne”-”not.” Often the nature of (such as untruth for “lie”). The most abundant of English prefixes, freely and generally used in Old English, were form more than 1,000 compounds. The word “toward” comes from Old English “toward” “in the direction of,” prepositional use of “toward” (adjective) “coming, facing, approaching, “from to (see to) + – ward.  One synonym for the word “untoward” is “unexpected,” while its antonym is “expected.” “Toward” is one of the difficult words in English.  The adjective “untoward” is used in a sentence to express something inappropriate or offensive. An example sentence of the word “untoward”, is “I hope nothing untoward will happen on the event.” 

4. Byzantine 

“Byzantine” involves the Byzantine Empire or the Eastern Orthodox Church. Another definition of “Byzantine” is something incredibly complicated, and usually relates to a great deal of administrative detail. “Byzantine” comes from the late Latin “byzantinus”, itself from Byzantium. The metaphorical senses gave rise to the reputation for palace intrigue of the Byzantium imperial court. The word “complicated is synonymous with “Byzantine.” The antonym of “Byzantine” is “simple.” The adjective ‘Byzantine” is used in sentences relating to complex, or complicated. The noun “Byzantine” is used in a sentence when referring to a native or citizen of Byzantium.  An example sentence of the word “Byzantine” is “We are engaged in a Byzantine process this evening,” and “Julie became more confused as she walked through the Byzantine maze.”   

5. Conciliate

The word “Conciliate” means to stop someone from being angry, or to pacify. “Conciliate” comes from the Latin “conciliatus”, the past participle of “conciliare “to bring together, unite in feelings,” from “concilium”, “a meeting, or gathering,” from an assimilated form of “com” “together, together with.” The earlier verb was Middle English concile “to reconcile” from the late 14th century. The synonym of “conciliate” is appeased, while its antonym is “irritate.” “Conciliate” is used in a sentence as a verb to overcome distrust, or to reconcile. An example sentence of the word “conciliate” is “Mayor George hoped that by calling them to his councils, he should conciliate the opposition.”

6. Equivocate

The word “equivocate” means to use ambiguous, or vague expressions.” The origin of “equivocate” comes from the late 15th century, from Medieval Latin equivocatus, the past participle of equivocare “to call by the same name, be called by the same name, have the same sound. ” “Equivocate” is synonymous with the word  “fudge.” The antonym of “equivocate” is “to be honest.” The verb ‘equivocate” is used in a sentence to deceive, or mislead, someone. An example sentence of the word “equivocate” is, “Please do not equivocate about this subject; we need to make a plan.” “Equivocate” is one of the most difficult words in English because it is not a common term used daily. 

7. Truculent

“Truculent” means quick to argue, or aggressively defiant. The origin of the word “trulucent” dates back to the 1530s, from Latin trulculentus meaning “fierce, savage, and cruel.” From trux (genitive trucis) “fierce, rough, wild,”. It has been used in English since the 16th century to describe a person or a thing that is cruel, and ferocious. The synonym of “truculent” is “defiant,” while its antonym is “amiable.” The word “truculent” is an adjective used in a sentence to describe someone who is quick to argue. An example sentence of the word “truculent”, is “He is always in a truculent mood.”  Not many people understood the meaning of “truculent” because it is not a common word. It is one of the most difficult English words.

8. Diatribe

“Diatribe” is a verbal attack against someone or something. The origin of “diatribe” started way back in the 1640s from the French diatribe, and directly from the Latin diatriba “learned discussion.” From the Greek diatribe “employment, study,” in Plato, “discourse,” literally “a wasting of time.” The modern definition “a strain of insult, a bitter, and violent criticism” by 1804, from the French. “Diatribe” is synonymous with “tirade.” The antonym of “diatribe” is “compliment.” “Diatribe” refers to a disrespectful speech or form of writing. The word “diatribe” is among the most difficult English words and is not commonly found in contemporary contexts. A “diatribe” nowadays, is less formal than a rant, made for criticism, employing humor, and sarcasm. An example sentence of the word “diatribe” is “The book is a diatribe against social media.”    

9. Quisling

The word ‘quisling” originated from “national traitor,” particularly during World War II in Nazi-occupied countries. It comes from the word “collaborationist,”, from Vidkun Quisling (1887-1945), a Norwegian fascist politician who led the puppet government during the German occupation of Norway in World War II. The traitor was shot because of treason after the German defeat. “Quisling” was first used in the London Times on April 15, 1940, in a Swedish context. The synonym of ‘quisling” is “backstabber.” The antonym of “quisling” is “patriot.” “Quisling” is used in a sentence as a noun, often attributive to a traitor. An example sentence of “quisling” is “All quislings would be punished without mercy.”

10. Artless 

The word “artless’ is defined as without effort or without skill. The history o the word “artless” started in the 1580s, “unskillful,” from “art” and “less.” The word ‘art” originated from early 13c, which means “skill as a result of learning.” From Old French art, from Latin artem (nominative ars), “work of art; practical skill; a craft. The word “less” came from Old English “leas” “free (from) false, feigned,” from Proto_Germanic “lausaz.” the synonym of ‘artless” is “ingenou.” The antonym of the word “artless” is “sophisticated.” The adjective “artless” is used in a sentence about lacking art or knowledge. ‘Artless” generally denotes an appearance of utter naturalness. The first known use o the word “artless’ was in 1586. An example sentence of the word “artless” is, “The diction is simple; however, the writing is artless.”

11.Blinkered                                                                                

“Blinkered” means narrow-minded, or having a limited understanding. The first known use of the word “blinkered” was in 1838. “Blinkered” is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe someone with a limited understanding of something. The origin of “blinkered” comes from the figurative sense, from horses being fitted with blinders to limit the range of their vision, in 1849. “Blinkered” is an adjective used in a sentence when describing a narrow-minded person. An example sentence of “blinkered” is, “His worst qualities are that he is blinkered most o the time.” “Blinkered” is considered one of the most difficult English words because it is British slang.

12. Maudlin

“Maudlin” means self-pitying, or feeling sorry for yourself. The origin of the word “maudlin” comes from the Middle English proper name Maudelen (early 14c), from Magdalene (Old French Madelaine), a woman’s name, which was believed to be similar to the repentant sinner forgiven by Jesus Christ. “Magdalene” was often shown crying as a sign of repentance in paintings. This association led to the constant portrayal of Mary Magdalene as a weeping  penitent. Even the name Magdalene suggested sad emotions to many native English speakers. The synonym of “maudlin” is “emotional.” The antonym of the word “maudlin”  is  “unemotional.” The adjective “maudlin” is used in a sentence to describe someone who is effusively sentimental. An example sentence of ‘maudlin” is “The Governor made a compassionate speech, without being maudlin.”

13. Invective

The word “invective” is defined as something abusive, or insulting. The history of the word “invective” comes from Middle French invective, from Medieval Latin invectiva (“abusive speech”), from Latin invectīvus, from invectus, the perfect passive participle of invehō (“bring in”), from in- + vehō (“carry”). The earlier noun form in English was inveccion, and invective in Middle English. The synonym of “invective” is “insult.” The antonym of the word “invective” is “compliment.” The noun “invective” is used in a sentence as a rude or unpleasant thing that people shout. It is a form of abusive expression or speech. “Invective” originated in the 15th century as an adjective relating to “insult.” The word “invective” is identical to “verbal abuse.” An example sentence of “invective” is “He indulged in the more violent invective.”

14. Remonstrate 

The word “remonstrate” means to plead in protest, or to oppose. “Remostrate” comes from Medieval Latin remonstratus, the past participle of remonstrate “to demonstrate.” Meaning “to show or present strong reasons against.” The first known use of “remonstrate” was in 1615. The synonym for “remonstrate” is “object.” The antonym for “remonstrate” is ‘accept.” “Remonstrate” is used in a sentence either as an intransitive or transitive verb. An example sentence of “remonstrate” is “The locals tried to remonstrate with the Mayor’s new policy.”

15. Sartorial

“Sartorial” means tailored clothes or relating to a tailor. The history of “sartorial” originated from Modern Latin sartorius, from the Late Latin word sartor “tailor,” “patcher, mender,” from Latin sart-, past participle stem of sarcire “to patch, mend.” From PIE root srko- “to make whole”).  One of the synonyms for sartorial is “elegant.” The antonym of sartorial is  “unstylish.” “Sartorial” is an adjective used in a sentence involving clothes. The word ‘sartorial” is mainly used in fashion magazines. “Sartorial” has been in style with English speakers since at least 1823. An example sentence of “sartorial” is “The Countess is determined to make sartorial choices that bring her joy.” “Sartorial” is one of the most difficult English words because many people do not commonly use it. 

16. Sybarite

The definition of ‘sybarite” is sensualist, or voluptuary. The word “sybarite” is a person devoted to pleasure.” The history of “sybarite” originated from an ancient Greek town in southern Italy, the inhabitants of Sybaris. They are people known for their love of Luxury. One synonym for the word “sybarite” is ‘sensualist.” The antonym for “sybarite” is “puritan.” ‘Sybarite” is a noun used in a sentence referring to sensualist. An example sentence of “sybarite” is “My grandma is a self-proclaimed sybarite, who wears nothing but luxurious clothes.” “Sybarite” acts as an adjective and a noun. “Sybarite” as a noun, is a person addicted to luxury. 

17. Inundate

“Inundate” means overwhelm, or overflow. It is typically used to refer to a deluge of water, and concerning an overflow of something less tangible. The origin of the word “inundate” comes from inundation in the 1620s. It originated from the Latin inundatus, the past participle of inundated “to overflow.” One synonym for “inundate” is “overflow.” The antonym for “inundate” is “drain.” “Inundate” is a verb used in a sentence referring to something overwhelming. An example sentence of “inundate” is “The storm will inundate low-lying regions in our country.”

18. Curmudgeon

The word “curmudgeon” means a person who gets annoyed easily, usually an old person. “Curmudgeon” originates from an unknown origin in the 1570s. According to the suggestion, it was based on a misreading of a garbled note from Johnson, that it was from the French “Coeur mechan” or “evil heart.” Most linguists believe that the word ‘cur”, meaning dog, is slightly connected to the word “curmudgeon.”  Liberman says the word “must have been borrowed from Gaelic muigean “disagreeable person.” The word “crank” is synonymous with “curmudgeon.” The antonym for “curmudgeon” is “cordial.” “Curmudgeon” is a noun used in a sentence pertaining to an old person who always has a bad temper.  An example sentence of “curmudgeon” is “Only a curmudgeon will not appreciate the neighborhood’s holiday decorations.”

19. Anodyne

The word “anodyne” as a noun means something that calms. “Anodyne” as an adjective means serving to lessen pain. The origin of “anodyne” originated in the 1540s, from the Medieval Latin anodynus “pain-removing,” from the Latin anodynus “painless.” From Greek anodynos “free from pain,” others suggest it is an asuffixed form of PIE root “ed” – “to eat,” “to devour.” As a noun, “substance which alleviates pain,” derived from old slang, an understatement for “death.” The synonym of “anodyne” is “bland.” The antonym of “anodyne” is “poisonous.” An example sentence of “anodyne” is “The doctor gave his patient a strong anodyne to relieve the pain.”

20. Gaffe

“Gaffe” means a diplomatic blunder, or an obvious mistake. The origin of the word “gafee” comes from perhaps French gaffe “clumsy remark’, from Old Provencal gafar “to seize, “from a Germanic source, from Proto_germanic Gaf-which is from the PIE root “kap” meaning “to grasp.” Possible origin from Modern English derived from the British slang verb gaff “to cheat,” or from the Scottish dialect of ‘loud, rude talk.” The synonym of “gaffe” is “mistake.” The antonym o the word “gaffe” is “correction.” “Gaffe” is a noun used in a sentence when referring to a noticeable mistake. An example sentence of “gaffe” is “He committed an embarrassing gaffe when he mispronounced a word, during his speech. “

21. Vie

The word “vie” means to compete, or to contend.  “Vie” comes from the 1560s “to bet, make a bet,” from the shortened form of Middle English envie “make a challenge.” From the Old French envier “compete, provoke, or summon,” in gambling, from Latin invitare “to invite.” The word “vie” is a verb used in a sentence to convey content or show superiority. The synonym of “vie” is “contend’. The antonym for the word “vie” is “agree.” An example sentence of “vie” is “The high school football team continues to vie for a national championship.” “Vie” is not a common word and is one of the most difficult English words.

22. Decimation

“Decimation” means the act of killing numerous animals, plants, or people in a certain area. The origin of “decimation” comes from Old French decimation, and directly from Late Latin decimationem (nominative decimatio) “the taking of a tenth.” A noun of action from past participle stem of Latin decimare “the removal or destruction of one-tenth,” from decem “ten.” The synonym for “decimation” is “devastate.” The antonym of “decimation” is  “construction.” “Decimation” is used in a sentence as a noun, the act of salvaging numbers of animals, plants, or people. An example sentence of “decimation” is “The decimation of the indigenous tribe is rampant during the ancient times.” 

23. Garrulous

The word “garrulous” means talking a lot, particularly about unimportant things. “Garrulous” comes from the Latin garrulus “talkative, chattering,” from garrire “to chatter.” It came from the PIE root gar – “to call, cry.” The synonym of “garrulous” is talkative. The antonym for the word “garrulous” is “concise.” “Garrulous” is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe someone having the habit of talking about a lot of unimportant things.  An example sentence of “garrulous” is “Our garrulous neighbor is busy gossiping again.” The word “garrulous” is among the most difficult English words. It is not a commonly used word daily. 

24. Hubris

The word “hubris” means an overbearing pride, or egotism. The history of the word ‘hubris” dates back to 1884, from the Greek word Hybris “wanton violence, insolence, outrage,” originally “presumption towards the gods. One synonym for “hubris” is  ‘arrogance.” The antonym of “hubris” is “modesty.” “Hubris” is used in a sentence as a noun, the act of being too proud. An example sentence of “hubris” is, “It is easy to offend people when blinded by hubris.” “Hubris” is one of the most difficult English words. It is not a common word encountered daily by many people. 

25. Dovetail

“Dovetail” means to connect precisely, or harmoniously. The history of “dovetail” dates back to the 1580s, dovetail, in carpentry, is “tenon cut in the form of a reverse wedge.” From the resemblance of shape in the tenon or mortise of the joints to that of the bird’s tail display. As a verb, “to unite by dovetail tenons.” The word “interlock” is synonymous with “dovetail.” The antonym for “dovetail” is “clash.”  Dovetail is used in a sentence as a verb to join or fit together. An example sentence of “dovetail” is “Many o the changes dovetail with work by the US and global regulators.”

26. Impetuous

The word “impetuous” means acting quickly without careful thought. The origin of “impetous” comes from late 14c, “hot-tempered”, late 15C., “done with a rush.”  It came from the Old French word impetuous, and from the Late Latin impetuous “impetuous, violent.” From Latin impetus “attack.” The synonym of “impetuous” is impulsive. The antonym of the word “impetuous” is cautious. “Impetuous” is used in a sentence as an adjective often applied to a lot of behavior, and to the person who displays that behavior. The word “impetuous” is commonly used for people and their actions. An example sentence of “impetuous” is “The newly crowned prince is known to be boastful, arrogant, and impetuous.”   

27. Circumlocution

“Circumlocution” means using numerous unnecessary words to convey an idea. The origin of the word “circumlocution” originates from the Latin circumlocutionem “a speaking around,” from circum “around, roundabout.” The synonym of “circumlocution” is “ambage.” The antonym of “circumlocution” is “directness.” ‘Circumlocution” is used in a sentence as a noun. The first known use of “circumlocution” dates back to 1518. An example sentence of the word “circumlocution” is “The author is trying to keep away from circumlocution in his writing.”

28. Surreptitious

The word “surreptitious” means to keep secret, an action done secretly. “Surreptitious” comes from mid-15c, from the Latin surrepticius, “stolen, furtive,” from surreptus, past participle of surripere “seize secretly, steal, plagiarize.”  The synonym of “surreptitious” is concealed. The antonym of “surreptitious” is open. “Surreptitious” is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe an action done secretly. The first known use of “surreptitious” was in the 15th century. An example sentence of ‘surreptitious” is “The popular singer made a superstitious entrance to the club through the little back door.”

29. Peripatetic

The word “peripatetic” means a follower of Aristotle, or an Aristotelan. “Peripatetic” comes from the mid-15th century. It comes from the word “Peripatetik”, “a disciple of Aristotle,” one of the sets of philosophers who followed the teachings of Aristotle. It came from Old French perypatetique from the 14th century. The synonym of the word “peripatetic” is nomadic. The antonym of “peripatetic” is settled. The word “peripatetic” is an adjective used in a sentence to describe a person traveling from place to place. An example sentence of “peripatetic” is “He worked as a peripatetic teacher for most of his life.”

30. Magisterial

“Magisterial” means relating to the characteristics of a master, or a teacher. “ Magisterial” originates from Medieval Latin magisterialis, “of or referring to the office of magistrate, director, or teacher.” The synonym of “magisterial’ is “authoritative.” The antonym of “magisterial” is “submissive.” “Magisterial” is an adjective used in a sentence relating to an authoritative person. The first known use of “magisterial” was in 1632. An example sentence of “magisterial” is “Our school principal spoke with a magisterial tone.”

31. Asperity 

The word “asperity” means harshness of behavior or speech that usually expresses anger. The origin of “asperity” comes from the 1200c, asprete “hardship,” from Old French asperité “difficulty, painful situation, harsh treatment” (12c., Modern French âpreté), a figurative use, from Latin asperitatem (nominative asperitas) “roughness,” from asper “rough, harsh,” which is of unknown origin. The Latin adjective was used for sour wine, bad weather, and hard times. The synonym of “asperity” is “roughness.” The antonym of “asperity” is “softness.” “Asperity” is a noun used in a sentence as a roughness of behavior. An example sentence of the word “asperity” is, “The child responded to her mother with a touch of asperity.”

32. Decry

“Decry” means to express strong disapproval. “Decry” comes from the French decrier “cry out, announce,” from the Latin quiritare “cry.” The synonym of the word “decry” is “criticize.” The antonym of “decry” is “applaud.” Decry demonstrates an open condemnation that makes it the best choice for cases in which criticism is not at all veiled. “Decry” is used in a sentence as a verb that shows belittling. An example sentence of “decry” is “The animal rights activists decry the country’s lack of animal rights law.” “Decry” is one of the most difficult words in English because it is not commonly used in daily conversations. 

33. Puerile

The word “puerile” means juvenile, immaturity, or childish. “Puerile” comes from the French  puéril, from the Latin puerilis “boyish, childish,” from puer “boy, child.” The synonym of “puerile” is “immature.” The antonym of “puerile” is “mature.” The first known use of the word “perile” dates back to 1527. The word “puerile” is used in a sentence as an adjective describing youth qualities, or immaturity. An example sentence of the word “perile” is, “Those teenage boys should not be tolerated for such puerile behavior.”

34. Incontrovertible

“Incontrovertible” means indisputable, or not open to queries. The first known use of “incontrovertible” was in 1646. “Incontrovertible” comes from the 1640s, from in “not” and controvert “oppose by argument.” The synonym of “incontrovertible” is “indisputable.” The antonym of “incontrovertible” is “disputable.” The antonyms controvertible and incontrovertible are both derivatives of the verb “controvert” (meaning “to dispute or oppose by reasoning”). “Incontrovertible” is used in a sentence as an adjective that describes something that is not open to questions. The first known use of “incontrovertible” was in 1646. An example sentence  of “incontrovertible” is “The jury was presented incontrovertible evidence during the trial.”

35. Inviolate

The meaning of “inviolate” is profaned, or not violated. The origin of word “inviolate” comes from the early 15c, from the Latin inviolatus “unhurt,” from in-” not, opposite of.” The synonym for “inviolate” is “sacred.” The antonym of “inviolate” is “profane.” The first known use of “inviolate” was in the 15th century.  “Inviolate” is used in a sentence as an adjective, especially to describe something pure. An example sentence of the word “inviolate” is, “The villagers were stunned to see the unearthed mummies in the cave are still inviolate.”

36. Puissant

“Puissant” means having great power, or influence. The history of the word “puisant” comes from the mid-15th century, “puissaunt” means influential, in a position of authority.” From the Old French puissant “strong, powerful.” From the stem of Old French poeir “to be able.” The synonym of “puissant” is “powerful.” The antonym of “puissant” is “flimsy.” The first known use of “puissant” was in the 15th century. “Puissant” is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe someone mighty and influential. An example sentence of the word “puissant” is, “The book was written by one o the nation’s respected authors and puissant advocates for human rights.”

37. Cosset

The word “cosset” means to care for, to pamper. “Cosset” comes from the Old English cot-sæta “one who dwells in a cot.” From a noun in the 1570s meaning “lamb brought up as a pet.” The synonym of the word “cosset” is “coddle.” The antonym of “cosset” is “neglect.” “Cosset” is used in a sentence as a verb to treat with extra care. The first known use of “cosset” was in 1579. An example sentence  of “cosset” is “The resort cossets its guests with hospitable service.” 

38. Eclectic

“Eclectic” means deriving ideas, or tastes, from a diverse range of sources. The origin of word “eclectic” comes from the French eclectique, from the Greek eklektikos “selective,” literally “picking out.” From eklektos.” The synonym of “eclectic” is “assorted.” The antonym of “eclectic” is “homogeneous.” “Eclectic” was used in a sentence as an adjective to describe something that is composed of elements from various sources. Eclectic was initially related to ancient philosophers who were not devoted to any sole system of philosophy, but instead chose whichever doctrines they liked from every school of thought. An example sentence of “eclectic” is, “The restaurant’s menu is so eclectic and includes various cuisine from all over the world.”

39. Iconoclast

“Iconoclast” means a person who attacks settled beliefs. The history of the word “iconoclast” date back to the 1590s, from French iconoclaste, and Medieval Latin iconoclastes, from Late Greek eikonoklastes, from eikon (genitive eikonos) “image” + latest “breaker.” The synonym of “iconoclast” is  “nonconformist.” The antonym of “iconoclast” is “conformist.” “Iocnoclast” is used in a sentence as a noun, pertaining to someone who attacks an institution or certain beliefs. An example sentence  of “iconoclast” is “Joseph was fired from his current job because he is an iconoclast.”

40. Anachronism

The word “anachronism” means the state of being chronologically out of place. “Anachrosnism” originated from the 1640s, “an error in computing time,” from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos, and from anakhronizien “refers to wrong time.” It was derived from ana “against” + khronos “time.” The synonym of “anachronismus” is  “antique.” The antonym of “anachronism” is “modern.” “Anachronism is used in a sentence as a noun referring to an error in chronology. The first known use of “anachronism” was in 1617. An example sentence of the word “anachronism” is, “In many households, most family meals has become an anachronism.” 

41. Enormity

“Enormity” means the state of being monstrous, or immoderate. “Enormity” comes from Old French enormité “extravagance, heinous sin,” from Latin enormitatem (nominative enormity) “hugeness, vastness; irregularity.” From enormis “irregular, huge”, meaning “ultimate wickedness” in English attested from the 1560s.  “Enormity” is synonymous with the word “wickedness.” The antonym of “enormity” is  “kindness.” “Enormity” is used in a sentence as a noun pertaining to an outrageous act. Although “enormity” was used since the late 1700s to describe something having a large size, its usage continues to be disparaged by many language commentators. They argue that “enormity” must be reserved for senses related to “great wickedness.” An example sentence of “enormity” is “The police officer was shocked at the enormity of the crime.”  

42. Dolorous

The word “dolorous” means causing misery, or grief. The origin of “dolorous” comes from the Old French doloros “painful, sorrowful,” from Late Latin dolorosus “painful, sorrowful,” from Latin dolor “pain, grief.” During 1400, “dolorous” was linked to physical pain. At present, “dolor” is used in English, meaning “sorrow.” The synonym of “dolorous” is “afflicted.” The antonym of “dolorous’ is “happy.”  “Dolorous’ is used in a sentence as an adjective expressing grief or pain. The first known use of the word “dolorous” was in the 15th century. An example sentence of “dolorous” is, “You can see in his dolorous expression that he had suffered enough.” 

43. Solicitous

“Solicitous” means expressing solitude, or being full of concerns. The history of “solicitous” comes from the Latin Sollicitus “restless, unease, full of anxiety.” The word “sol” comes from the Proto-Indo-European root meaning “whole.” The synonym of “solicitous” is “attentive.” The antonym of “solicitous” is “thoughtless.” “Solicitous” is used in a sentence as an adjective that shows a full of concern or fear. The first known use of the word “solicitous” was in 1563. An example sentence of “solicitous” is “Mr. Antonio had always been solicitous for the welfare of his students.”

44. Impugn

“Impugn” means to oppose or attack as false or lacking integrity. The origin of the word “impugn” comes from the late 14th century, from Old French impugner, from Latin impugnare “to fight against,” In its earliest known English use in the 1300s, impugn refers to a physical attack. The synonym of “impugn” is “condemn.” The antonym of “impugn” is “defend.” The first known use of impugn” was in the 14th century. An example sentence of “impugn” is “The Governor leaked news of the arrest to the media to impugn his rival’s character.”

45. Despot

Despot means having unlimited power over other people. The first known use of the word “despot” was in 1604. It originated from Middle French despote, from Greek despotēs master, lord, autocrat, from des- (akin to domos house) + -potēs (akin to posis husband); akin to Sanskrit dampati lord of the house — more at. The synonym of “despot” is “dictator.” The antonym of “despot” is “democrat.” An example sentence of “despot” is, “She was a successful choreographer, but many of her students regarded her as a petty despot.” 

46. Splenetic

The word “splenetic” means showing or having a bad temper regularly. The history of “spelenetic” dates back to the e1540s. It comes from the Late Latin speleneticus, from spleen, meaning “irritable morose.”  The synonym of “splenetic” is “ill-tempered.” “Splenetic” is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe a bad temper.  The antonym of “splenetic” is “good-humored.” The first known use of “splenetic” was in 1697. An example sentence of “splenetic” is “The rude and splenetic expression was evident in his face.” 

47. Abrogate

“Abrogate” means to abolish by authoritative action. The word “abrogate” comes from the Latin abrogatus, the past participle of abrogare “to annul, repel (a law), from ab “off, away from.”  The synonym of “abrogate” is “abolish.” The antonym of “abrogate” is “institute.” “Abrogate” is used in a sentence as a verb that shows abolishing using an authoritative action. An example sentence of “abrogate” is  “The U.S. Congress can abrogate old treaties that are unfair to Native Americans.” 

48. Inveterate

The word “inveterate” means habitual or firmly established by long persistence. It comes from the Latin inveteratus “of long-standing, chronic, old,” past participle of inveterare “become old in.” From in- “in, into” (from PIE root en “in”) + verb from vetus (genitive veteris) “old” (veteran) which led to the Latin verb inveterare (“to age”). The verb, in turn, eventually gave rise to the adjective inveteratus, the direct source of the adjective inveterate (in use since the 14th century). “Inveterate” has meant “long-standing” or simply “old,” in the past. The first known use of “inverterate” dates back to the 15th century. “Inverterate” is used in a sentence as an adjective relating to a habit. An example sentence of “inveterate” is “He became an inveterate liar.” 

49. Officious

“Officious” means volunteering one’s services even when not needed. “Officious” comes from the Latin officiosus “full of courtesy, dutiful, obliging,” from officium “duty, service.” The synonym of officious is “impertinent.” The antonym of “officious” is “timid.” The word “officious is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe someone who always volunteers to help even when not needed. The first known use of “officious” was in the 15th century. An example sentence of “officious” is “Lory doesn’t like it when officious strangers try to start a conversation in the checkout line.”

50. Pillory

A “pillory” means a device used for punishing criminals, consisting of a wooden frame with holes in which the head and hands are locked. Having unlimited power over other people. The first known use of the word “despot” was in 1604. It originated from Middle French despote, from Greek despotēs master, lord, autocrat, from des- (akin to domos house) + -potēs (akin to posis husband); akin to Sanskrit dampati lord of the house — more at. “Pillory” is used in a sentence either as a noun or a verb. “Pillory” as a noun pertains to a device used for punishing offenders in public. The word “pillory” means to set in a pillory as punishment, as a verb. It is a wooden frame with holes for the head and hand. The first known use of “pillory” was in the 13th century. An example sentence of “pillory” is “He endured public humiliation in a pillory and was sent to jail.”

51. Abject

The word “abject” means existing in a very low state. “Abject” comes from Latin inveteratus “of long-standing, chronic, old,” past participle of inveterare “become old in,” from in- “in, into” (from PIE root en “in”) + verb from vetus (genitive veteris) “old” (veteran). Which led to the Latin verb inveterare (“to age”). The verb gave rise to the adjective inveteratus, the direct source of the adjective inveterate (in use since the 14th century). Inveterate was meant as “long-standing” or simply “old” in the past. The first known use of “abject” was in the 15th century. “Abject” is used in a sentence as an adjective showing hopelessness or cast down in spirit.  An example sentence  of the word “abject” is, “He was an abject teenager when his parents died.” 

52. Candor

“Candor” means honest, or sincere expression. The history of the word “candor” comes from the Latin candor “purity,” initially from “whiteness, radiance,” from candere “to shine, to be white.” It was borrowed earlier in English from the Latin literal sense of “extreme whiteness.” “Candor” is synonymous with the word “sincerity.” The antonym of “candor” is “dishonesty.” “Candor” is used in a sentence as a noun. An example sentence of the word “candor” is, “Our Leader must earn a reputation for candor, and integrity.” 

53. Cogent

“Cogent” means logical, appealing forcibly to the mind. The history of “cogent” comes from the French cogent “necessary, urgent,” from the Latin cogentem (nominative cogens), the present participle of cogere “to curdle, to compel.” The synonym of “cogent” is  “compelling.” The antonym of “cogent” is “uncompelling.” “Cohent” is used in a sentence as an adjective for incisive presentation. An example sentence of “cogent” is, “Usually her argument was cogent.”

54. Dearth

“Dearth” means an inadequate amount, especially food or scarcity. The origin of “dearth” comes from the abstract noun from the root of Old English deore “precious, costly” + abstract noun suffix -th. The synonym of “dearth” is “drought.” The antonym of “dearth” is “abundance.” Dearth, in one form or another, has been used to describe things that have been in short supply since at least the 13th century, when it often referred to a food shortage. The word “dearth” is used in a sentence as a noun, specifically relating to famine. An example sentence  of “dearth” is “There was a dearth of fresh fruits at the local grocery store.” 

55. Evanescent

The word “evanescent” means fleeting, or fading away. “Evanescent” comes from the French évanescent, from the Latin evanescentem (nominative evanescens), the present participle of evanescere “disappear, vanish, pass away.” “Evanescent” is synonymous with the word “passing.” The antonym of “evanescent” is “endless.” “Evanescent” is used in a sentence as an adjective to vanish like vapor. The first known use of “evanescent” was in 1717. An example sentence  of “evanescent” is “The newly crowned Miss Globe has a beauty that is evanescent as a rainbow.” 

56. Cognizant

“Cognizant” means having knowledge of something. The first known use of “cognizant” was in 1820. The word “cognizant” is linked to “cognizance,” which comes from Anglo-French conysance “recognition,” which later became “knowledge.” It comes from the Old French conoissance “acquaintance, recognition, knowledge.” “Cognizant” is synonymous with the word “conscious.” The antonym of “cognizant” is “insensible.” “Cognizant” is used in a sentence as an adjective for having knowledge of something. An example sentence of “cognizant” is, “It was only then that she seemed to become cognizant of her surroundings.”   

57. Futuous (Fatuous)

“Fatuous” means silly, or foolish.  The word “fatuous” comes from the Latin fatuus “foolish, silly, insipid,” which is of uncertain origin. The first known use of “fatuous” was in 1633. The synonym of “fatuous” is “foolish.” The antonym of “fatuous” is “intelligent.” “Fatuous” is used in a sentence as an adjective for being stupid. “Fatuous” is used in a sentence as an adjective to describe a foolish person. An example sentence of “fatuous” is, “Buying a house without negotiating down the price is a fatuous move.”

58. Mendacious

“Mendacious” means lying, or not telling the truth. The origin of the word “mendacious” comes from the French menacieux, directly from the Latin mendacium “a lie, falsehood, untruth, fiction.” The synonym for “mendacious” is “dishonest.” The antonym of “mendacious” is “honest.” “Mendacious” is used in a sentence as an adjective describing a person who tells a lie. The first known use of “mendacious” was in 1616. An example sentence of “mendacious” is, “A product claiming to help one get whiter skin instantly is mendacious advertising.”

59. Disparate

The word “disparate” means different in kind, or markedly distinct in quality. The origin of “disparate” comes from the Latin disparate, the past participle of disparate, which means “divide, separate,” from dis – “apart” + parare “get ready.” The meaning was influenced in Latin by dispar which means “unequal, unlike.” The word “disparate” is synonymous with the word “different.” The antonym of “disparate” is “alike.” “Disparate” is used in a sentence as an adjective showing differences in qualities or character. An example sentence of “disparate” is “The new student is having a hard time adapting to two disparate cultures.”

60. Ubiquitous

“Ubiquitous” means being everywhere or being found everywhere. The origin of word “ubiquitous”  comes from ubiquity + ous. The earlier word was Ubiquitary, from Modern Latin ubiquitous, from Latin ubique, “everywhere.” The synonym of “ubiquitous’ is “common.” The antonym of “ubiquitous” is “rare.” “Ubiquitous” is used in a sentence as an adjective describing something or someone that seems to be everywhere. “An example sentence of the word “ubiquitous” is “Sugar is ubiquitous in the dishes prepared.”  

61. Capitulate

The word “capitulate” means to surrender after negotiations. “Capitulate” comes from Medieval Latin capitulatus, the past participle of capitulare, “to draw up in heads or chapters,” and “arrange conditions.” The word “capitulate” was often used in terms of surrender. The synonym for “capitulate” is “give in.” The antonym of “capaitulate” is “resist.” “Capitulate” is used in a sentence as an intransitive verb to cease resisting. The first known use of “capitulate” was in 1596. An example sentence of “capitulate” is “The rebel group as forced to capitulate, and free their captives.” 

62. Divisive

“Divisive” means creating dissension, or tending to cause disagreement. The origin of “divisive” comes from the past participle stem of Latin dividere meaning “to divide.” The first known use of the word “divisive” dates back to 1642. The synonym of “divisive” is “disruptive.” The antonym of “divisive” is “agreement.” The word “divisive” is used in a sentence as an adjective creating disunity. An example sentence of “divisive” is “Selena made a divisivse move, and lost her friends in the process.”

63. Extant

“Extant” means currently existing, or surviving. The origin of word “extant” originated from the Latin extantem (nominative extans), the present participle of extare, which means “stand out, be visible, exist,” from ex “out” + stare “to stand.” The first known use of “extant” dates back to 1545. The synonym for “extant” is “alive.” The antonym of “extant” is “extinct.” “Extant” is used in a sentence as an adjective for still existing. An example sentence of “extant” is “One of the oldest buildings in our town is extant up to this day.”    

64. Fetter  

“Fetter” means a chain around the ankles or to restrain from motion. “Fetter” comes from the Old English fetor, which means “chain or shackle by which a person or an animal is bound by the feet,” figuratively meaning “check, restraint.” The synonym of “fetter” is “constraint.” The antonym of “fetter” is “unbind.”  The first known use of the word “fetter” dates back to the 12th century. “Fetter” is both a noun and a verb, depending on its usage in a sentence. As a verb, “fetter” is used to restrain the action. As a noun, “fetter” refers to the chain for the feet. An example sentence of “fetter” is, “I can still hear the sound of the jingling metal fetters on his feet.” 

65. Hegemony

“Hegemony” means domination or leadership. The origin of “hegemony” comes from the Greek hēgemonia “leadership, a going first.” Initially, it came from the predominance of one city or another in Greek history. The first known use of “hegemony” dates back to 1567. The synonym for “hegemony” is “dominance.” The antonym of “hegemony”  is “impotency.” “Hegemony” is used in a sentence as a noun referring to authority over others. An example sentence of “hegemony” is, “Rome succeeded to the hegemony o the Latin league.” 

66. Inoculate

 “Inoculate” is defined as giving a person or animal a vaccine. “Inoculate” originates from the Latin inoculatus, the past participle of inoculare “graft in, implant a bud.” It means to “implant germs of a disease to produce immunity.” “Inoculate” was then applied to other forms of engrafting, including establishing vaccines as a preventative against certain diseases. The first known use of “inoculate” dates back to 1721. “Inoculate” is synonymous with the word “infuse.” The antonym of “inoculate” is “eliminate.” The word “inoculate” is used in a sentence as a verb to introduce active material to treat a disease. An example sentence of “inoculate” is, “The doctor was able to inoculate people with a polio vaccine.”       

67. Linchpin

“Linchpin” means a locking pin inserted crosswise or a person vital to an enterprise. “ Linchpin” originates from the Middle English lins “axle.” It is a word of uncertain origin. The first known use of the word “linchpin” dates back to the 13th century. English speakers used “linchpin” for anything as critical to a complex situation as a linchpin was to a wagon in the early 20th century. The synonym for “linchpin” is “anchor.”  The antonym of ”linchpin” is “disallow.” “Linchpin” is used in a sentence as a noun. An example sentence of “linchpin” is “sales is the linchpin of almost any business.” 

68. Mores

“Mores” means the fixed moral binding of a certain group, an essential characteristic of a community, or social norms. “Mores” originates from the Latin mores, “customs, morals, or manners.” The synonym for “mores” is “etiquette.” The antonym of “mores” is “unconventional.” The first known use of “mores’ dates back to 1898.  “Mores” is used in a sentence as a plural noun, referring to more than one person or thing.  An example sentence of “mores” is “Their mother teaches them good manners, and social mores.”

69. Pariah

“Pariah” means a member of a low caste of Southern India, or an outcast. “Pariah” originates from the Portuguese paria or directly from Tamil (Dravidian) paraiyar, plural of paraiyan “drummer” (at festivals, the hereditary duty of members of the largest of the lower castes of southern India), from parai “large festival drum.” Pariah” is synonymous to the word “outcast.” The antonym of “pariah” is “insider.” “Pariah” is used in a sentence as a noun referring to an outcast. The first known use of “pariah” dates back to 1613. An example sentence of “pariah” is, “They discovered what it meant to be a pariah in their own country.” “Pariah” is among the difficult English words that are not used in daily conversations.

70. Reprobate

“Reprobate” means a depraved person. The word “reprobate” works in a sentence as a noun, verb, or adjective. The verb form of “reprobate” means to condemn strongly as evil. The adjective form of “reprobate” means morally corrupt. The noun form of “reprobate” means an unprincipled person. “Reprobate” comes from the early 15c., “rejected as worthless,” from Late Latin reprobatus. From the past participle of reprobare “disapprove, reject, condemn,” from Latin re- “back, again,” here perhaps indicating “opposite of, reversal of the previous condition” (see re-) + probare “prove to be worthy” (see probate (n.)). The meaning “abandoned in character, morally depraved, unprincipled” was by the 1650s. The original reprobates were hardened sinners who had fallen from God’s grace. In time, the name was used outside of religious contexts for anyone who behaved morally wrong. In Late Latin, reprobare means “to disapprove” or “to condemn.” An example sentence of “reprobate” is “A band of reprobate criminals was sentenced to death.” 

71. Worcestershire

Worcestershire is a savory vinegar, soy sauce, and spices sauce. It was originally made in England.  Worcestershire sauce is probably Worcestershire’s most well-known product. It was first produced in Worcester by two chemists, John Wheeley Lea and William Perrins, and they tried to sell it in 1837. It is still made in the city today, although the recipe’s origin remains a mystery. The first known use of the word “Worcestershire” dates back to 1843. It comes from Wireceastre (1086), Old English Wigranceastre (717), and Weogorna civitas (691), from Weogora, a tribal name. Worcestershire sauce (Lea & Perrin’s) is attested from 1843. “Worcestershire” is used in a sentence as a noun, a sauce whose ingredients are composed of soy sauce, vinegar, and spices. An example sentence of “Worcestershire” is, “Add oil, garlic, and Worcestershire sauce.”

72. Onomatopoeia

“Onomatopoeia” originates from the Late Latin onomatopoeia, from Greek onomatopoiia “the making of a name or word” (in imitation of a sound associated with the thing being named). From onomatopoios, from onoma (genitive onomatos) “word, the name” (from PIE root no-men- “name”) + a derivative of poiein “compose, make” (see poet). English speakers have started to use the word onomatopoeia since the mid-1500s, but people have been creating words from the sounds heard around them for much longer. The language’s presence of many imitative words generated the linguistic bow-wow theory, which suggests that language originated in imitation of natural sounds. “Onomatopeia” is used in a sentence as a noun for the naming of a thing based on its vocal imitation. An example sentence of “onomatopeia” is “There is an element of onomatopoeia in the phrase.”

73. Sesquipedalian

“Sesquipedalian” means having several syllables. The word “sesquipedalian” comes from Latin sesquipedalia “a foot-and-a-half long.” The first known use of the word “sesquipedalian” was in 1656. The synonym of “sesquipedalian” is “polysyllable.” The antonym of “sesquipedalian” is “monosyllabic.” “Sesquipedalian” is used in a sentence as an adjective, given to the use of long words. An example sentence of “sesquipedalian” is, “She thought that using many sesquipedalian phrases would make her look smarter.”     

What are the Reasons for Existing Difficult Words in English?

Difficult English words exist because some people want to use words that are descriptive as possible when expressing themselves. English is widely recognized by many. However, there are still English words that are difficult to understand. Not all recognize and are familiar with these difficult English words. Difficult English words are sometimes used to express the exact message a writer wants to convey to their readers. Certain words have distinct meanings that deliver a solid and impactful message when used in a sentence. Difficult English words are not typically used in a person’s daily living. Aside from the difficulty in meaning, most difficult words are hard to spell too. Words are constantly evolving, there are new modern words nowadays that the older generations are unfamiliar with. Difficult English words only show how diverse it is. Words are not only restricted geographically and socially. They are often limited to speaking and writing styles, making them difficult.     

How to Determine Difficult Words in English?

Difficult English words sometimes appear in a sentence, and people find it hard to know their meaning initially. Several difficult words in English are not familiar and are used daily. Create a learning system first to determine difficult words in English. Using a learning system that fits one’s capability. Learning systems are a person’s method of understanding, memorizing, and applying difficult English words. Second, define the goal. A person is learning these tricky words in English for studies, work, or effective communication. One must identify the reasons for learning these difficult words to set a goal. Third, know how to pronounce difficult words correctly. Every word has its way of being said. One has to ensure to listen to the word clearly to pronounce it correctly and efficiently. Know the syllables of every word. Repeated word dividing allows one to pronounce the word quickly. Fourth, find the synonyms of the difficult word. Put a difficult English word in a sentence, replace it with one of its synonyms, then do it again. Notice that difficult words are easier to understand. Lastly, apply the learnings. Use difficult English words in daily conversations. Familiarization in that way becomes easier. Use them in writing school essays, and reports. Learning difficult English words is retained in a person’s memory when used daily, like easy English words.    

How do Content Writers use Difficult English Words?

Content writers use difficult English words effectively. However, a content writer’s biggest challenge is the English language’s enormous vocabulary. English has borrowed several words from other languages, greatly widening its vocabulary. Content writers use difficult English words on almost any kind of topic. Difficult English words are not very common and are not always used in a sentence. A writer must know the basic rules when it comes to grammar in content writing. Not only is proper grammar practiced by content writers, even the choice of words matters. Common and easy words in English make one’s writing appear ordinary and common. The content writer uses difficult English words to clarify the subject or give extra subject information. Using difficult English words means that sensory verbs like appears, look, smell, sound, or taste function as difficult English words when describing a subject. Difficult English words, when utilized properly in a sentence, make the content unique, and distinct. One of the most effective ways content writers do to expand their vocabulary is through reading. Viewing words in the context of books, articles, and conversations help them understand and figure out the meaning of words that are not familiar to them. Reading is a major part of their writing process, although writing is what content writers usually do. Content writers always use appropriate and grammatically correct words, which is very important in Content Writing

Do English Difficult Words Affect SEO and UX?

Yes, difficult English words affect SEO and UX. Understanding the meaning of a difficult word takes a lot of time, and learning. Choices of words are significant in communicating better. Imagine reading a book, and the author uses difficult words in every sentence; it annoys most readers. One must have to look first at the meaning in the dictionary to understand what is being written in the book. Difficult words impact the user experience of a reader because one needs to learn first the meaning of the difficult word to understand a sentence entirely. Compared to easy words used in daily conversations, difficult English words must be processed in our brains first. However, difficult English words are essential in improving one’s vocabulary. It improves one’s way of communication, and it serves as a second language. Having a vast vocabulary is helpful, too, especially at work, as it gives the impression that a person is knowledgeable. Using words that are easy to understand is essential, in whatever aspect. The same thing goes for SEO. Informative, and valuable content helps a website rank better. Consistent use of keywords, and quality content.     

Do Difficult English Words affect User Experience?

Yes, difficult English words influence user experience. Users need clarification when certain words appear, and they need help understanding them. Not only are these words not usually seen in daily conversations, but their meaning is quite hard to remember. A word is considered to be easy when it is used regularly. One gets to be familiar with a particular word, which is always present in magazines, books, and other forms of writing. Imagine a reader encountering an unfamiliar and challenging word in a sentence. It interrupts their reading because the reader needs help understanding the difficult English word. One has to look up a dictionary to know the meaning of a difficult word. Every word is deliberate and purposeful. Each word creates an impact. Good word choices make it easy to communicate. Users are able to understand clearly if a word is familiar and understandable. Words are potent symbols capable of evocative expression, categorization, and conceptualization, and it makes sense that they impact the user experience.    

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