What is a Linking Verb? Linking Verb Types and Examples

Linking verbs are known as connecting verbs. Linking verbs demonstrate a connection between the subject and the entire sentence. They do not describe any action taken by the subject. Permanent linking verbs, sensor linking verbs, and conditional linking verbs are three types of linking verbs. Permanent linking verbs are often referred to as “true” linking verbs. Permanent linking verbs are called “permanent” or “true” because these linking verbs are always linking verbs. Sensory linking verbs are linking verbs that connect or clarify the subject by using words that imply relating to sensation or the physical senses. Conditional linking verbs are used in forming conditional sentences. 

Knowing and understanding the correct uses of linking verbs creates a clear message when writing. It is crucial to use grammatically correct terms and words in content writing. Content writers must know when and how to use linking verbs and other parts of speech to write a quality article. Content writers must study each word and its uses to avoid making mistakes. Linking verbs are parts of speech that complete a sentence. People use these words every day to communicate, and knowing their proper uses matters.   

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What is a Linking Verb

A linking verb is a type of verb that indicates no action by itself. Linking verbs show a connection between the subject and the entire sentence. Linking verbs are noted as connecting verbs. Linking verbs do not describe any action taken by the subject. They are verbs that describe the subject instead of the action, as other verbs do.

What does a linking verb do?

Linking verbs utilize subject complements. Linking verbs give features about a subject in a sentence. Subject complements are either adjectives or nouns. A linking verb relates the sentence’s subject to a word that describes the subject, such as a circumstance. The linking verb only connects the topic with the rest of the phrase, without demonstrating any action. 

What is a linking verb in a sentence?

A linking verb connects the subject to a subject complement in a sentence, which is why sometimes linking verbs are called connecting verbs. A linking verb is a verb that establishes an identity between the subject and complements or serves as a connecting link between the two. For example, the sentence “The ball is red.” uses the linking verb “is” to link the subject “ball” with the adjective “red,” which provides information about the subject.

How to recognize a linking verb in a sentence?

The writer must start by switching the suspected verb to “is” or “are” to recognize a linking verb in a sentence. The verb is indeed linking if the sentence still makes sense after changing it. “Is” and “are” are not only valuable stand-ins for other verbs, but serve as linking verbs. Another method is to insert an equal sign, “=,” in place of a suspected verb. Linking verbs serve the same purpose as an equal sign because linking verbs establish the relationship between the subject of a sentence and a specific state. For example, “Andrew looks sick.” Replacing the verb “looks” with an equal sign, “Andrew = sick.” Since the sentence has the same meaning, “looks” is a linking verb. The last key is determining if the verb describes an action or state of being. A linking verb is likely to describe the subject’s current state, but it’s probably not if the verb specifies an action.        

How to use linking verbs?

 Listed below is the instruction on how to use linking verbs.

  1. Linking verbs work as intransitive verbs: Linking verbs are used instead to work as intransitive verbs, which don’t take direct objects. Direct objects do not take by linking verbs. A verb is not a linking verb when there is a direct object in a clause or sentence.
  2. Linking verbs never refer to actions: Actions are never mentioned in linking verbs. Linking verbs never refer to actions, implying that linking verbs are never action verbs. Not all stative verbs are linking verbs even though all stative verbs are linking verbs.
  3. Linking verbs are stative verbs: Using linking verbs in continuous verb tenses is less likely to happen because linking verbs are stative verbs. For instance, “The game seems like a lot of fun!” is more common than “The game looks like a lot of fun!”
  4. Linking verbs can be irregular verbs: The verbs “be” and “become” are two examples of irregular verbs. Use the proper conjugation to use these verbs in sentences.
  5. Linking verbs must follow the subject-verb agreement: A singular linking verb is used with a singular subject, whereas a plural linking verb is used with a plural subject. 
  6. Be mindful when combining adverbs with linking verbs: Use an adjective after a linking verb to describe the subject. Using an adverb in a statement affects the meaning because linking verbs do not refer to actions. The phrases “The boy seemed weak to me” and “The boy looked weakly to me.” have two distinct meanings. Place the adverb before the linking verb in employing an adverb with a linking verb. For instance, “Kris seemed angry,” or “The caterpillar slowly became a gorgeous butterfly.”     

When to not use a linking verb?

Linking verbs are not used with an adverb. Alternatively, an adjective is used after linking verbs. Always remember the rule, with an action verb, use an adverb. Use an adjective with a linking verb. Overusing linking verbs is not necessary, especially when writing. One way of increasing the strength of one’s writing is by avoiding the immoderate use of linking verbs, which are verbs that detail a state of being. Some options to replace linking verbs are combining two sentences with the same subject and moving the predicate to the adjective. 

What are the common mistakes while using linking verbs?

Listed below are the common mistakes while using linking verbs.

  • Using linking verbs to describe an action: Using linking verbs to describe an action is another common mistake. A subject is connected to the words that describe it by a linking verb. Linking verbs do not explain actions, unlike action verbs. A linking verb denotes a state of being.   
  • Using the linking verb to describe the subject: Using the linking verb to describe the subject is another common mistake. An adjective after a linking verb is used to describe the subject. 
  • Subject-verb agreement: Subject-verb agreement is one common mistake while using linking verbs. A singular linking verb is used with a particular subject, whereas a plural linking verb is used with a plural subject.
  • Irregular verbs and Conjugation errors: Irregular verbs and conjugation errors are other common mistakes while using linking verbs. Linking verbs are irregular verbs. The verbs “be” and “become” are two examples of irregular verbs. Using these verbs in sentences, always remember to use the proper conjugation. 
  • Using an adverb after a linking verb: Using an adverb after a linking verb is another mistake. Using an adverb in a statement could affect the meaning because linking verbs do not refer to actions. Place the adverb before the linking verb in employing an adverb with a linking verb.

What are the most common linking verbs

Listed below are the most common linking verbs.

  • Is: “Is” is a verb, customarily linking a singular subject with an adjective. For example, in the sentence “The horse is black.” The linking verb “is” is used to link the characteristic of the subject “horse” being “black.”
  • Was: “Was” is a linking verb that links a subject with an adjective or a noun that describes and modifies the subject. For example, in the sentence, “Lucy was sentimental about the gift on her 18th birthday.” “Was” connects the subject “Mary” to the adjective “sentimental.”
  • Am: “Am” is a linking verb that links the subject with an adjective or a noun that describes the subject. For example, in the sentence “I am a mother.”  “Am” connects the subject “I” with the noun “mother.”
  • Are: “Are” is a linking verb commonly used to link a plural subject with an adjective. For example, in the sentence “The students are noisy.” “Is” is used to link the subject “students” to describe it as  “noisy.”
  • Were: “Were” is a linking verb that connects a plural subject with an adjective. For example, in the sentence “The roads were slippery.” The linking verb “were” is used to link the subject “roads” to describe it as “slippery.”

What are the types of Linking Verbs?

Listed below are the types of Linking Verbs.

  • Permanent Linking Verbs: Permanent linking verbs are called “permanent” or “true” because these linking verbs are at all times linking verbs. Permanent linking verbs never explain the action. Permanent linking verbs always link the subject to more details, instead. 
  • Sensory Linking Verbs: Sensory linking verbs are linking verbs that connect or clarify the subject by using words that imply physical senses. Adjectives are used with sensory linking verbs rather than adverbs.
  • Conditional Linking Verbs: Conditional linking verbs are used in forming conditional sentences. Conditional linking verbs are observed in sentences that express hypothetical or improbable circumstances. 

1. Permanent Linking Verbs

Permanent linking verbs are called “permanent” or true” because these linking verbs are always linking verbs. Permanent linking verbs never explain the action. Permanent linking verbs always link the subject to more details instead. The most popular type of “to be,” “to become,” and “to seem” are permanent linking verbs.

Permanent Linking Verb Sentence Examples
  • She wants to be an astronaut someday: The sentence used the permanent linking verb “be.” “Be” is used to connect the subject to more details.
  • You need to become more aggressive: The sentence uses the “become” permanent linking verb. “Become” is the linking verb in the sentence because the verb is employed to start to be something. “Become” is a linking verb followed by an adjective or a noun complement. 
  • Oliver didn’t seem affected by her hurtful words: The permanent linking verb “seem” is used to link the subject and does not explain the action.
  • They seem to know many people: “Seem” is used in the sentence as a permanent linking verb. “Seem” is the linking verb in the sentence because the verb is used to denote a state of being or appearing in a particular way.
  • According to the invitation, the wedding will be held in their backyard: The sentence used the “be” permanent linking verb. “Be” is used to connect the subject to more details.

2. Sensory Linking Verbs

Sensory linking verbs are linking verbs that connect or clarify the subject by using words that imply relating to sensation or the physical senses. Sensory linking verbs like appear, look, feel, smell, sound, or taste function as linking verbs when describing a subject. Adjectives are used with sensory linking verbs in English rather than adverbs.

Sensory Linking Verb Sentence Examples
  • I miss the sound of my mother’s voice: The sensory linking verb in the sentence is the word “sound,” which connects the subject “voice.”
  • I love the smell of freshly baked cookies: The sensory linking verb in the sentence is the word “smell.” It connects the subject “cookies” to the adjective “freshly,” which gives the subject a character. 
  • She forgot to taste the soup: “Taste” is the sensory linking verb in the sentence. It is used to identify the subject “soup.”
  • The dress made her look older: The sentence used the “look” as a linking verb. “Look” is a sensory linking verb because the word is modified by the adjective “older.”
  • The sun begins to appear today: The sentence uses “appear” as a linking verb. “Appear” is a sensory linking verb because it is used to identify the subject “sun.”

3. Conditional Linking Verbs

Conditional linking verbs are used in forming conditional sentences. Conditional linking verbs are observed in sentences that express hypothetical or improbable circumstances. Conditional sentences describe potential outcomes based on whether a precondition is satisfied. The word “if” is frequently used with one of the conditional linking verbs to indicate such a condition in conditional phrases.

Conditional Linking Verb Sentence Examples
  1. I would travel to Europe if I had enough money: The sentence used the linking verb “would travel” and the proposition “if,” making it a conditional sentence.  
  2. Carlo would have married her if she hadn’t cheated on him: The sentence used the linking verb “would travel” and the proposition “if,” making it a conditional sentence.     
  3. My cousin will come over tomorrow if he finishes his school project: The sentence used the linking verb “will come,” implying an improbable circumstance made by the proposition “if” at the beginning of the sentence.   
  4. My sister could have been a beauty queen if she was taller: The sentence used the linking verb “could have been” to indicate a condition, denoted by the preposition “if.” However, the “had been” in the sentence is a linking verb.
  5. Christine will come to my party if she finishes work early: The sentence used the linking verb “will come,” implying an improbable circumstance made by the proposition “if.”

What are the frequently asked linking verb questions?

Listed below are the frequently asked linking verb questions.

  • Is “Of” a linking verb?: “Of” is a preposition, not a linking verb. A preposition such as “of” denotes a relationship between other words, such as “belonging,” “made of,” “contains,” or “a point of reckoning.” The proposition “of” is used to demonstrate how one subject or person is related to another item or person. Other than that, when wishing to imply that something or someone belongs to or is a component of another subject or person, the preposition “of” is used.
  • Is “Been” a linking verb?: “Been” is permanent, sometimes referred to as a true linking verb. “Been is considered a permanent linking verb because the verb does not describe the action, but always connects the subject to additional information. The many forms of “to be” including “have been,” “has been,” “may have been,” and “must have been” are linking verbs.
  • Is “Be” a linking verb?: “Be” is one of the permanent linking verbs. “Be” is considered a permanent linking verb because the verb does not describe the action, but always connects the subject to additional information. The many forms of “be” including “can be,” “could be,” “may be,” and “should be” are linking verbs.
  • Is “Are” a linking verb?: “Are” is a linking verb, commonly used to link a plural subject with an adjective. For example, in the sentence “The girls are happy because they’re eating altogether.” The verb “are” is a linking verb because a predicate adjective follows the verb and the subject is plural. However, a linking verb such as “are” is used as a helping verb.
  • Is “Can” a linking verb?: “Can” is a helping verb, not a linking verb. “Can” is a helping verb that is in the modal form. Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb is used to discuss possibility and obligation.
  • Is “from” a linking verb?: “From” is a preposition, not a linking verb. The proposition “from” means showing the exact moment a specific process, event, or activity begins. “From” is a preposition of time. The time link between the nouns and the other sentence components is indicated by prepositions of time. The most common time prepositions are on, at, in, from, to, for, since, ago, before, till/until, and by.
  • Is “Were” a linking verb?: “Were” is one of the permanent linking verbs. “Were” is considered a permanent linking verb because the verb does not describe the action, but always connects the subject to additional information. “Were” shows the presence of something or points to a state of being. 
  • Is “Might” a linking verb?: “Might” is a helping verb. “Might” is a helping verb that is in the modal form. Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb is used to discuss possibility and obligation. A modal helping verb like the word “might” is used to establish the mood of a verb.
  • Is “At” a linking verb?: “At” is a preposition, not a linking verb. The preposition “at” is used to specify a time or location. At the same time, prepositional phrases that specify the subject of a sentence are introduced with the preposition “at.” Prepositional phrases frequently begin with prepositions like “of,” “at,” and “for” and these words change either the noun or the verb that came before in the sentence.
  • Is “Look” a linking verb?: “Look” is frequently used as a linking verb with appear, be, become, and seem. “Look” is a linking verb that does not require an object and is followed by a phrase or clause that elaborates on the subject. “Look” as a linking verb is sometimes followed by the words like, as if, or as though. All the sense verbs such as look, smell, sound, touch, and taste are used as linking verbs.
  • Is “After” a linking verb?: “After” is used as a preposition, as an adverb, or as a conjunction. “After” is used as a preposition when followed by a noun. “After” is used as an adverb when in a sentence the word is without a following noun. “After” is used as a conjunction when the word is connecting two clauses.
  • Is “And” a linking verb?: “And” is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word that joins words, phrases, and clauses together. The English language has many conjunctions, but some of the most popular ones include and, or, but, because, for, if, and when. Conjunctions such as “and” allow the user to form complex, elegant sentences. “And” as conjunction helps share ideas and make sentences more connected and comprehensive.
  • Is “for” a linking verb?:  “For” is used as a preposition or as a conjunction. The word “for” is used to denote the purpose of something, the place where a person or object is going, or the length of time, “for” is used as a preposition. “For” when used as a conjunction is akin to that of the words “because” or “since.”
  • Is “with” a linking verb?:  “With” is a preposition. “With” as a preposition indicates how a noun or a pronoun relates to another word. “With” is a word that combines with a noun phrase to establish a term that expresses a modification or prediction.
  • Is “Have” a linking verb?:  “Have” is an irregular verb. Had, have, and had, are the three forms of the irregular verb “have.” “Has” is used in the present simple third-person singular. “Have” is never a linking verb when used as a regular verb. 
  • Is “Am” a linking verb?: “Am” is a linking verb that connects the subject with an adjective or a noun that describes the subject. “Am” is the first-person singular present of “be.” All forms of “be” including “am” are linking verbs.
  • Is “Appears” a linking verb?: “Appears” is a linking verb categorized as a sensory linking verb. The linking verb “Appears” connects the subject to the predicate to imply a sense of sight.
  • Is “Should” a linking verb?: “Should” is a helping verb. “Should” is a helping verb that is in the modal form. Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb like the word “should” is used to give advice or recommendation or express the conditional mood.
  • Is “so” a linking verb?:  “So” is a conjunction, an adjective, an interjection, or an adverb. “So” is one of the seven coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions include for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. “So” when used as a conjunction denotes “in order that.” “So” when used as an adjective to mean true, in that state, with that attribute and replaces the adjective phrase. “So” is used as an interjection after a pause for thought. “So” is used as an adverb. “So” is used to modify an adjective, verb, or another adverb.
  • Is “by” a linking verb?: “By” is an adverb and a preposition. “By” is used as an adverb when the word is used in a sentence without a following noun. However, the word “by” is used as a proposition when a noun follows the word in a sentence.
  • Is “Will” a linking verb?: “Will” together with “shall” are modal verbs. “Will” is used when it comes to talking about what is going to happen. “Will” as a modal verb is used, especially when referring to things that are not certain or things that are planned.
  • Is “My” a linking verb?: “My” is a pronoun. “My” is a pronoun, referred to as a possessive adjective. My, your, his, her, it, our, and, there is a possessive adjective. Possessive adjectives such as “my” function as possessive noun substitutes. “My” is called a possessive pronoun because the word “my” means to signify possession.
  • Is “Went” a linking verb?: “Went” is the past tense form of the word “go.” “Go” is an action verb. “Went” is not a linking verb.
  • Is “Could” a linking verb?: “Could” is a modal verb. “Could” is used with the base form of a verb. “Could” is considered the past form of “can.” Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb is used to discuss possibility and obligation. “Could” is used to indicate a possibility.
  • Is “See” a linking verb?: “See” is an action verb. The verb “see” is generally not used as a linking verb, although the word is categorized under sensory verb. The more common linking verb that signifies the sense of seeing is the verb “look.”

Is “of “A Linking Verb

No, “of” is not a linking verb. “Of” is a preposition, not a linking verb. A preposition such as “of” denotes a relationship between other words, such as “belonging,” “made of,” “contains,” or “a point of reckoning.” The proposition “of” is used to demonstrate how one subject or person is related to another item or person. Furthermore, when wanting to imply that something or someone belongs to or is a component of another subject or person, the preposition “of” is used. For instance, in the sentence, “John hides under the stairs of the classroom.” The preposition “of” denotes a point of reckoning that John is called upon to be accounted for the action, hiding under the classroom stairs.  

Is “Been” a Linking Verb

Yes, “Been” is a linking verb. “Been” is permanent, or sometimes referred to as a true linking verb. “Been is considered a permanent linking verb because the verb does not describe the action, but always connects the subject to additional information. The many forms of “to be” including “have been,” “has been,” “may have been,” and “must have been” are linking verbs. For example, in the sentence, “The guests must have been hungry all this time.” The phrase “must have been” identifies that the dogs currently exist in a physical state of hunger. 

Is “Be” a Linking Verb

Yes, “Be” is a linking verb. “Be” is among the permanent linking verbs. “Be” is considered a permanent linking verb because the verb does not describe the action, but always connects the subject to additional information. The many forms of “be,” including “can be,” “could be,” “may be,” and “should be,” are linking verbs. For example, in the sentence, “You should be home by 12 pm.” The phrase “should be” characterizes the subject, “you.”   

Is “Can” a Linking Verb

No, the word “can” is not a linking verb. “Can” is a helping verb. The term “can” is a helping verb in modal form. Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb is used to discuss possibility and obligation. For instance, in the sentence “Can I borrow your pen?” The word “can” does not link a subject to a noun or an adjective. Instead, “can” denotes a chance that the speaker will not be allowed to borrow the pen. Therfore, “can” is a helping verb that is in a modal form.

Is “from” A Linking Verb

No, “from” is not a linking verb. “From” is a preposition, not a linking verb. The proposition “from” means showing the exact moment a specific process, event, or activity begins. “From” is a preposition of time. The time link between the nouns and the other sentence components is indicated by prepositions of time. The most common time prepositions are on, at, in, from, to, for, since, ago, before, till/until, and by. For example, in the sentence “The new teacher is from Australia.” The preposition “from” is used to refer to the originating country of the teacher.  

Is “Were” a Linking Verb

Yes, “were” is a linking verb. “Were” is among the permanent linking verbs. The word “were” is considered a permanent linking verb because it does not describe the action, but connects the subject to additional information. “Were” indicates the presence of something. It is a linking verb because “were” does not indicate action. For example, in the sentence, “Mom and Dad were exhausted.” The word “were” links the subject, Mom and Dad, to the predicate, exhausted. 

Is “Might” a Linking Verb

No, “might” is not a linking verb. “Might” is a helping verb. “Might” is a helping verb that is in the modal form. Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb is used to discuss possibility and obligation. A modal helping verb like the word “might” is used to establish the character of a verb. For example, in the sentence, “It might take a lifetime.” The verb “might” is used to refer to a possibility. The word “might” does not link a subject to a noun or an adjective. Instead, the word “might” denotes a possibility of a lifetime. The word “might” is a helping verb that is in a modal form. 

Is “at” A Linking Verb

No, “at” is not a linking verb. “At” is a preposition, not a linking verb. The preposition “at” is used to indicate a time or location. At the same time, prepositional phrases that identify the subject of a sentence are introduced with the preposition “at.” Prepositional phrases frequently begin with prepositions like “of,” “at,” and “for,” and these words change either the noun or the verb that came before in the sentence. Prepositions such as “at” describe the sentences “who, “what,” “where,” “why,” or “how.” For example, in the sentence, “She was standing at the corner of the bar.” “At” is used as a preposition to specify the subject. 

Is “Look” a Linking Verb

Yes, the word “look” is a linking verb. “Look” is regularly used as a linking verb with appear, be, become, and seem. “Look” is a linking verb that does not require an object and is followed by a phrase or clause that elaborates on the subject. “Look” as a linking verb is sometimes followed by the words like, as if, or as though. All the sense verbs, such as look, smell, sound, touch, and taste, are used as linking verbs. For example, in the sentence, “It looks like it is going to rain.” The word “look” is used as a linking verb with the format look like + noun phrase.    

Is “After” a Linking Verb

No, “after” is not a linking verb. “After” is used as a preposition, as an adverb, or as a conjunction. “After” is used as a preposition when followed by a noun. “After” is used as an adverb when the word is without a following noun in a sentence. “After” is used as a conjunction when the word is connecting two clauses. For example, in the sentence, “I love drinking wine after dinner.” The word “after” is used as a preposition following the noun dinner. The sentence states, “Jason was hospitalized yesterday and discharged the day after.” The word “after” is used as an adverb, since the word is without a following noun. While in the sentence, “After you’d left, the DJ played your favorite song.” The word “after” is used as a conjunction, wherein the word connects the two clauses.  

Is “and” A Linking Verb

No, “and” is not a linking verb. “And” is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word that joins words, phrases, and clauses together. The English language has many conjunctions. Some of the most popular ones include and, or, but, because, for, if, and when. Conjunctions such as “and” allow the user to form complex, elegant sentences. “And” as conjunction helps share ideas and make sentences more connected and comprehensive. For example, in the sentence, “Sheila and Jenny go to the same school.” The word “and” is a conjunction connecting two homogeneous or similar words or phrases.  

Is “for” A Linking Verb

No, the word “for” is not a linking verb. “For” is used as a preposition or as a conjunction. The word “for” denotes the purpose of something, the place where a person or object is going, or the length of time, “for” is used as a preposition. For example, in the sentence, “The applicant waited for four hours for the interview.” The word “for” is used to indicate the time in which the subject “waited” for “four hours.” To connect two clauses in a sentence, the word “for” is used as a conjunction. “For” when used as a conjunction is similar to that of the words “because” or “since.” For instance, in the sentence, “The boy was tired after the exercise, for he had been forced to do fifty push-ups.” The word “for” is used as a conjunction that indicates the reason, and combines the two clauses.   

Is “with” A Linking Verb

No, “with” is not a linking verb. “With” is a preposition. “With” as a preposition indicates how a noun or a pronoun relates to another word. “With” is a word that combines with a noun phrase to form a phrase that expresses a modification or prediction. For example, in the phrase “Slain with robbers.” “With” as a preposition describe the success of a cause, a method, or an instrument. “With” is sometimes an equivalent to “by.”  

Is “Have” a Linking Verb

No, “have” is not a linking verb. “Have” is an irregular verb. “Had,” “have,” and “has” are the three forms of the irregular verb “have.” “Has” is used in the present simple third-person singular. “Have” is never a linking verb when used as a regular verb. For instance, in the sentence, “The family usually has dinner at about seven.” The word “have” is used as an irregular verb, since “have” does not follow the usual inflection pattern.   

Is “Am” a Linking Verb

Yes, “am” is a linking verb. “Am” is a linking verb that connects the subject with an adjective or a noun that describes the subject. “Am” is the first-person singular present of “be.” All forms of “be” including “am” are linking verbs. For example, in the sentence, “I am a writer.” The linking verb “am” connects the subject “I” with the noun “writer.”

Is “Appears” a Linking Ver

Yes, “appears” is a linking verb. “Appears” is a linking verb categorized as a sensory linking verb. The linking verb “Appears” connects the subject to the predicate to imply a sense of sight. For example, in the sentence, “Elma appears tired after hours of walking.” The adjective “tired” describes the subject “Elma.” Elma is tired after walking. The linking verb “appears” connects “Elma” to the adjective “tired.” 

Is “Should” a Linking Verb

No, “should” is not a linking verb. “Should” is a helping verb. “Should” is a helping verb that is in the modal form. Modal helping verbs include the words “can,” could,” “might,” “may,” “should,” “shall,” “will,” “would,” “must,” and “ought to.” A modal helping verb discusses possibility and obligation. A modal helping verb like the word “should” is used to give advice or recommendation or express the conditional mood. For example, in the sentence, “Hailey should get a makeover.” The verb “should” is used to offer advice or opinion, similar to “ought to.” 

Is “so” A Linking Verb

No, the word “so” is not a linking verb. “So” is an example of a conjunction, an adjective, an interjection, or an adverb. “So” is among the seven coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions include for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. “So” when used as a conjunction denotes “so that.” For example, in the sentence, “Eat your veggies, so you can have the dessert.” The word “so” is used to connect the two ideas. “So” must mean true, in that state, with that attribute and replaces the adjective phrase when used as an adjective. For example, in the sentence “That is so.” The word “so” signifies being true. “So” is used as an interjection after a pause for thought. “So, that’s the end of the party.” is an example. “So” is used as an adverb. “So” is used to modify an adjective, verb, or another adverb. For instance, in the sentence, “Carl is so good at dancing!” The word “so” is used as an adverb that further modifies the verb dancing.  

Is “Are” a Linking Verb

Yes, “Are” is a linking verb. “Are” is a linking verb commonly used to link a plural subject with an adjective. For example, in the sentence, “The students are happy because they are graduating.” The verb “are” is a linking verb because a predicate adjective follows the verb and the subject is plural. However, a linking verb such as “are” is used as a helping verb. The verb “are” is used in a sentence following an -ing verb like eating, running, and others, the verb is not linking. It is used as a helping verb.    

Is “by” A Linking Verb

No, the word “by” is not a linking verb. “By” is an adverb and a preposition. “By” is used as an adverb when the word is used in a sentence without a following noun. For example, in the sentence, “As time went by, things have changed.” The word “by” is not followed by a noun. The word is used as an adverb. However, “by” is used as a preposition when a noun follows the word in a sentence. For instance, in the sentence, “The town was destroyed by an earthquake.” The word “by” is a preposition, since the noun earthquake follows the word.  

Is “Will” a Linking Verb

No, “will” is not a linking verb. “Will” together with “shall” are modal verbs. “Will” is used when it comes to talking about what is going to happen. “Will” is a modal verb, mainly when referring to things that are not certain or planned. For example, in the sentence, “Amanda will sing at a birthday party tomorrow.” The word “will” is used as a modal verb for a thing that is already planned.    

Is “My” a Linking Verb

No, “my” is not a linking verb. “My” is a pronoun. “My” is a pronoun referring to a possessive adjective. My, your, his, her, it, our, and there is a possessive adjective. Possessive adjectives such as “my” function as possessive noun substitutes. “My” is called a possessive pronoun because the word “my” means to signify possession. For instance, in the sentence “This is my car.” The possessive adjective “my” takes the place of the possessive form of the speaker’s name. The desk belongs to the person speaking.  

Is “Went” a Linking Verb

No, “went” is not a linking verb. “Went” is the past tense form of the word “go.” “Go” is an action verb, and “went” is not a linking verb. For example, in the sentence, “They went to the mall last week.” The word “went” relates to the action of going to the mall. The word “went” was used as an action verb. A linking verb does not show action.   

Is “Could” a Linking Verb

“Could” is an example of a second type of helping verb, known as modal. Modals include the words: can, could, might, may, should, shall, will, would, must, and ought to. A modal helping verb is used to discuss obligation and possibility. For instance, in the sentence, “An improvement in Alzheimer’s disease treatment could be years away.” The word “could” indicates the chance of treating Alzheimer’s disease is almost possible.  

Is “See” a Linking Verb

No, the word “see” is not a linking verb. “See” is an action verb. The verb “see” is not a linking verb, although the word is categorized as a sensory verb. The more common linking verb that signifies the sense of seeing is the verb “look.” For example, in the sentence, “The couple is seeing a play this evening.” The word “see” denotes the action of watching a play. The word, “see” is not a linking verb. Instead, “see” is an action verb. 

How to use Linking Verbs in a proper English Tense?

Past, present, and future are the three main verb tenses. The past tense is used to describe things that have already happened. Present tense describes events that are presently taking place, or that are continuous. Things have yet to happen in the future tense. A verb takes effect when its action determines its tense. Part of the verb tenses is the aspect of the verb. Verb tenses tell things like whether the action is continual, ongoing, or completed. 

Listed below are guides on using Linking Verbs in Proper English Tense.

  • Been: “Been” is the past participle of “be.” “Been” is only used in the perfect tense. The perfect tense is used when wanting to focus on the present results of things that have been done in the past. For example, in the sentence “Cindy has been to Spain a few times.” the linking verb “been” is used in the present perfect tense. The sentence must be “The students had been to Yale once before” if using the linking verb in the past perfect tense. To use the linking verb “been” in the future perfect tense, the sentence should be “The class will have been here for half a year in December.”
  • Be: The many forms of “be” including “can be,” “could be,” “may be,” and “should be” are linking verbs. “Be” is a linking verb that joins the subject of a sentence to a word that tells something about the subject. The indicative or simple present, the present perfect, and the present continuous are all variations of the verb “be’s” present tense. To use the linking verb in the present tense, use the word “am” if referring to a singular subject. To use the linking verb in the present tense, use the word “are” if referring to a plural subject. The words “was” and “were” are the past simple equivalents for the linking verb “be.” For example, in the sentence, “I am happy.” The linking verb “be” is used in the singular present tense. “We are happy.” the linking verb “be” is used in the plural present tense. While in the sentence, “I was happy.” the linking verb “be” is used in the singular past tense. “We were happy.” the linking verb “be” is used in the plural past tense.   
  • Are: “Are” is the conjugated form of the linking verb “to be.” The present indicative form of “to be,” “are” is used in the second-person singular and plural present, first-person plural present, and third-person plural present tense of the linking verb “to be.” For example, in the sentence, “You are blessed to have a complete family.” The linking verb “are” is used in the second-person singular present tense. 
  • Were: “Were” is the subjunctive of the linking verb “to be.” The linking verb “were” is used for both the second-person past tense (you) and the third-person plural past tense (they and we). For instance, in the sentence, “You were exhausted upon arriving in the hotel.” The linking verb “were” is used in the second-person past tense. 
  • Look: “Look” is in the present tense form. To use the linking verb in the present participle add -ing to the root word “look” forming “looking.” To use the linking verb in the past tense and past participle, add -ed to the root word “look” forming “looked.” For example, in the sentence, “It looks like it is going to snow today.” The linking verb “looks” is in the present tense.  
  • Am: “Am” is the first-person form of the present tense of the linking verb “be.” “Am” is the first-person singular present of “be.” “Am” is used in the simple present tense. For instance, in the sentence “I am a singer.” The linking verb am is in the simple present tense. 
  • Appears: “Appears” is the third-person singular simple present indicative form of “appear.” The linking verb “appears” in the past tense is “appeared.” The present participle of “appear” is “appearing.” While “appeared” is the past participle of the linking verb “appear.” For example, in the sentence, “Julia appears tired after hours of jogging.” The linking verb “appears” is used in the third-person singular simple present indicative form. 

How does Content Writing use Linking Verbs?

Content writers use linking verbs to write effectively. A linking verb is a verb in the English language that connects a subject with a subject complement. Content writers use linking verbs in almost any kind of topic. Linking verbs are very common and are always used in a sentence. A writer must know the basic rules when it comes to grammar in content writing. Content writing uses linking verbs to clarify the subject or give extra subject information. Using linking verbs means that when describing a subject, sensory verbs like appears, look, smell, sound, or taste function as linking verbs. Linking verbs, when utilized properly in a sentence, makes content easy to read and understand. Content writers always use appropriate and grammatically correct words, which is very important in Content Writing

How does Google recognize Linking Verbs?

Search engines like Google first gather data through an automated process called “spidering.” The process crawls the Internet and collects web-page data into servers. Then, Google would have to index the data to make it functional. For each of the searches done by a user, the search engines use an algorithm to determine which listings to show and in what order. The algorithms are either simple, multi-layered, or compound.  Each word is identified by Google, whether they are a noun, a verb, or any part of speech. Linking verbs are determined by Google with the same process. 

How do SEOs should know about linking verbs?

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is about helping search engines understand and present content. Proper word usage, like linking verbs, is essential in SEO. Understanding the appropriate usage of every word is necessary to communicate better. Grammatical errors in writing unintentionally alter what authors want to convey. It is either a wrong spelling or a misuse of terms. A misused word in a sentence delivers a different meaning to the reader. The same thing to misspelled words, a word with the wrong spelling shows a lack of professionalism and incompetence. Quality content matters in SEO. Most websites that rank high contain good-quality written articles or content. Poorly written articles hurt a website’s ranking, and misspelled and misused words are common grammatical errors by authors. According to polls conducted by some agencies, on average, 59% of consumers would not buy from an online shopping site with bad spelling and poor grammar. Poor grammar disturbs the flow of one’s writing. It impacts the user experience of a reader and causes misinformation and misunderstanding.

What is the difference between Linking Verbs and Helping Verbs?

The main distinction between linking and helping verbs is that linking verbs do not indicate an action while helping verbs are used alongside the main verb. The Linking Verb connects the subject of a sentence with more information about the subject. Helping verbs, on the other hand, are used along with the key verb. The helping verb supports the verb and the sentence by adding information about the verb, like tense. Linking verbs do not express an action, but rather a state of being, or a condition. It is not a battle between linking verbs and helping verbs in content writing. Their correct use is what matters, especially for readers. Content writers use grammatically correct words to effectively write something and convey a clear message. Linking and helping verbs are parts of speech essential to constructing a sentence. Content writers use them to complete a sentence. Linking and helping verbs are both functions to make a sentence complete. They have distinct and separate roles in the English language that help with better communication.  

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