Ultimate Strong Verbs to Use when Writing

A strong verb is a specific, descriptive, and evocative version of a basic verb that generate a stronger visual and helps to create a mood for the scene or sentence. The technical definition of a strong verb is a verb that goes through a stem modification when it changes tense, such as blow/blew/blown. Strong verbs convey a more precise meaning without the help of modifiers or qualifications. It makes the writing more compact and short and makes the readers more interested. Using strong verbs lessen the usage of adverbs, avoid writing in passive voice, and help to remove wordiness. Readers are more captivated if the writers create content using active verbs since it is more engaging and provides a better experience to the reader. Strong verbs are essential to better writing and creating a more profound impact on the reader. Using a strong verb is able to make the writing stand out and help the readers to know what the writer is trying to imply or describe. It makes the readers imagine what they are reading. Additionally, the verbs affect the SEO and the relevance of the content or the information related to the query. Moreover, strong verbs changes in tenses. Irregular strong verbs change their spelling in the form of past tense and past participle. The spelling does not change, whether for American or British spelling. Most of the strong verbs have different accents depending on the English language; however, their definitions are still the same. Content writers must know how and when to use strong verbs to effectively convey the message to the readers. Furthermore, there are 11 types of verbs, including action verbs, stative verbs, transitive verbs, intransitive verbs, linking verbs, helping verbs, modal verbs, regular verbs, irregular verbs, phrasal verbs, and infinitives. There are more than 200 strong verbs in the English language. Most of the words in the strong verb list are regular and irregular verbs.

Listed below are the ultimate strong verbs to use when writing.

  1. Absorb: Absorb is a transitive verb. Its definitions are “to take in or soak up something by chemical or physical action,” “to take in and understand the information, idea or experience fully,” “take control of a smaller entity and make it a larger one,” or “take up and reduce the effect or intensity of a sound or an impact,” “to take up the attention of someone or interest greatly.” 
  2. Advance: Advance is a transitive and intransitive verb. Its definitions of advance are “to move forward purposefully” or “to make or cause making progress.” The word indicates “to accelerate or to make earlier, or to raise in rate or rank.” 
  3. Advise: Advise is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of advise is “to give someone a recommendation, caution or inform.” 
  4. Alter: Alter is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the word are “to change or cause in character or composition; make structural changes; or tailor a clothing for a better fit or to conform to fashion.” 
  5. Amend: Amend is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of amend are “to change the words of a text, especially a law or a legal document,” “to reform oneself,” or “to modify for improvement by modification, deletion, or addition.”
  6. Amplify: Amplify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of amplify are “to expand something, such as a statement, by the use of detail or illustration or by closer analysis” or “to increase amount, importance, or intensity.” 
  7. Attack: The word “attack” is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of attack are “to set upon or work against forcefully,” “to assail with unfriendly or bitter words,” “to start to affect or to act on injurious,” “to set to work on,” or “to begin to eat eagerly.” 
  8. Balloon: Balloon is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the balloon are “to swell, puff out, or expand,” “to ascend or travel in or as if in a balloon,” or “to increase or inflate rapidly.” 
  9. Bash: Bash is a transitive and intransitive verb. Bash is “to strike violently, such as hit or smash” or “to attack physically or verbally.” 
  10. Batter: Batter is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of batter are “to beat with successive blows to bruise, shatter, or demolish,” “bombard,” “to coat with a mixture, such as flour and egg, for frying,” “to offensively touch or use force on a person without the person’s consent,” or “to strike something heavily and repeatedly.” 
  11. Beam: Beam is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the beam are “to transmit data electronically, especially by satellite or wirelessly,” “to emit in beams or as a beam,” “to support with beams,” “to direct to a particular audience,” “have a complexion with a strong bright color,” “experience happiness or an intense emotion,” express with a beaming face or smile,” or “to send out rays of light.” 
  12. Beef: Beef is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of beef are “complaining or grumbling a lot about something or someone,” or “to increase or add substance, strength, or power.” It is commonly used as a verb phrase “beef up.” 
  13. Blab: Blab is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of blab are “to talk idly or thoughtlessly” or “to reveal a secret, especially without reserve or discretion.” 
  14. Blast: Blast is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the blast are “to use an explosive or shoot,” “to proceed rapidly or aggressively,” “to make a vigorous attack,” or “to play loudly or blare.” 
  15. Bolt: Bolt is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of bolt as an intransitive verb are “to move suddenly, nervously, or start,” “to move or proceed quickly, dash,” “to break away from or oppose one’s precious affiliation,” or “to produce seed prematurely.” 
  16. Boost: Boost is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of boost are “to push or shove up from below,” “to increase or raise,” “to promote the cause or interest,” or “steal or shoplift.”
  17. Brief: Brief is a transitive verb. The definitions of the brief are “to make an abstract or abridgment of,” “to give final precise instructions to,” “to coach thoroughly,” “to provide important information to,” or “to provide a lawyer the facts of a legal case to take them to court.”
  18. Broadcast: Broadcast is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of broadcast are “to disperse or distribute seed or something similar over a broad area,” “to make widely known,” “to convey or relay using radio, television, or internet,” or “to speak or perform on a broadcast program.”
  19. Brood: Brood is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of brood are “to sit on or to incubate eggs,” “to produce by or as if incubation or hatch,” “to think anxiously or grimly about,” or “to sit silently and seriously or meditate.”
  20. Burst: Burst is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of burst are “to break open, apart, or into pieces, commonly from impact or from pressure from within,” “to provide a way from an excess of emotion,” “to come out or spring suddenly,” or “launch or drop.” 
  21. Bus: Bus is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the bus are “to travel by a large motor vehicle intended to transport passengers, commonly along a fixed route according to a schedule,” “to transport by bus,” or to remove dirty dishes from.” 
  22. Bust: Bust is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of bust as a transitive verb are “to break or wreck with force,” “break up,” “to ruin financially, or exhaust,” “to give a hard time,” “demote,” “arrest or raid,” “hit or slug,” or “to execute or perform.” 
  23. Capture: Capture is a transitive verb. The definitions of capture are “to take or gain control by force,” “to emphasize, represent, or preserve, in a more or less permanent form,” or “to fascinate and hold the interest of.” 
  24. Catch: Catch is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of catch are “to capture or take especially after chase,” “to find unexpectedly,” “to take or to knot in or as if in a trap,” “to take hold of or seize,” “to grasp hastily or try to grasp,” “to take in or retain,” “to get aboard in time,” “to become affected,” or “to see or watch.” 
  25. Charge: Charge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of charge are “to ask for payment or to ask payment to a person,” “to give an electric charge to,” “to record an item as an expense debt, obligation or liability,” “to impose a financial burden on,” “to place the guilt or blame,” “to impose a task or responsibility on,” “to command, instruct, or exhort with authority,” “to load or fill,” or “to attack or to bring a weapon into position.”
  26. Chap: Chap is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of chap are “to open in cracks, slits, or chinks” or “to cause to chap.” 
  27. Chip: Chip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of chip are “to cut or hew with an edged tool,” “to cut into chips, or break a small piece or fragment from something,” to hit with backspin, usually a return in tennis,” or “to play a chip shot.”
  28. Clasp: Clasp is a transitive verb. The definitions of clasp are “to secure with or as if with a clasp,” “to enclose and hold with the arms or cuddle,” and “to seize with or as if with the hand or grasp.” 
  29. Climb: Climb is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the climb are “to go upward with gradual or continuous progress,” “to go upward or raise oneself, especially by grasping or clutching with the hands,” “to go about or down commonly by grasping or holding with hands,” or “to get into or out of clothing commonly with some haste or effort.”
  30. Clutch: Clutch is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the clutch are “to grasp or hold with or as if with the hand or claws commonly strongly, tightly, or suddenly” or “to operate an automobile clutch.”
  31. Collide: Collide is an intransitive verb. The definitions of collide are “to come together with solid or direct impact” and “used of situations in which people or groups disagree or are very different from each other or clash.”
  32. Command: Command is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of command are “to direct authoritatively or order,” “to exercise a dominating influence over,” or “to order or request to be given.”
  33. Commune: Commune is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the commune are “to receive Holy Communion, “to communicate intimately, especially on a spiritual level,” or “talk over or discuss.” 
  34. Cower: Cower is an intransitive verb. The definition of cower is “to lower the head or body or curl up in fear, often while moving backward.”
  35. Crackle: Crackle is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crackle are “to make small sharp, sudden, repeated noises,” “to form a network of fine cracks on the surface,” or “to show animation or sparkle.” 
  36. Crash: Crash is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crash are “to break violently and noisily or smash,” “to damage in landing,” “to go to bed or fall asleep,” “to enter or attend without invitation or without paying,” “to move toward aggressively,” or “to cause to crash, such as in a computer system or program.” 
  37. Crave: Crave is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crave are “to ask for earnestly: beg or demand,” “to want greatly or need,” “to yearn for,” or “to have a string or inward desire.” 
  38. Crush: Crush is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crush are “to squeeze or force by pressure to alter or destroy the structure,” “to reduce to particles by pounding or grinding,” “to subdue completely,” “to cause overwhelming emotional pain to someone,” “to experience an intense and passing infatuation on someone,” or “hug or embrace.” 
  39. Dangle: Dangle is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of dangle are “to hang loosely and commonly to be able to sway freely,” “to be a hanger-on or a dependent,” and “to occur in a sentence without having a normally expected syntactic relation to the rest of the sentence.” 
  40. Dash: Dash is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of dash are “to move with sudden speed,” “to break by striking or knocking,” “smash, ruin, or destroy,” “to make ashamed, or “depress or sadden,” “to complete, execute, or finish off hastily,” or “to affect by mixing in something different.”
  41. Demolish: Demolish is a transitive verb. The definitions of demolish are “to break to pieces, such as smash, tear down, or raze,” “to do away with or destroy,” or “to strip of any pretense of merit or credence.” 
  42. Depart: Depart is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of depart are “to leave or go away,” “die,” or “to turn aside or deviate.” 
  43. Deposit: Deposit is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of deposit are “to place or to safe keep,” “to put in a bank,” “to lay down,” or “to let fall, such as sediment.” 
  44. Detect: Detect is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of detect are “to discover the true character of,” “to discover or determine the existence, presence, or the fact of,” “demodulate,” or “to work as a detective.”
  45. Deviate: Deviate is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of deviate are “to stray from a standard, principle, or topic,” “to depart from an established course or norm,” and “to cause to turn out of a previous course.” 
  46. Devour: Devour is a transitive verb. The definitions of devour are “to eat up hungrily,” “to use up or destroy as if by eating,” “to prey upon,” or “read something rapidly and eagerly.” 
  47. Direct: Direct is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of direct are “to cause to turn, move, or point exactly or to follow a straight course,” “to point, extend, or project in a specified line or course,” and “to regulate the activities or course of,” to carry out the organizing, energizing, and supervising of,” “to train or lead performances,” “to impart orally,” “to adapt in expression to have particular applicability,” “to write a letter to a person,” “to show or point out the way,” or “to request or enjoin with authority.”
  48. Discern: Discern is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of discern are “to detect with the eyes,” “to detect with senses other than vision,” “to recognize or identify as separate and distinct or discriminate,” “to come to know or recognize mentally,” and “to see or understand the difference.” 
  49. Discover: Discover is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of discover are “to make known, visible, or exposed,” “display,” or to obtain sight or knowledge of for the first time or find,” “to make a discovery,” or “to find out.”
  50. Dismantle: Dismantle is a transitive verb. The definitions of dismantle are “to disconnect the pieces,” “to destroy the integrity or functioning,” “to strip of dress or to cover or divest,” or “to strip of furniture and equipment.” 
  51. Download: Download is a transitive verb. The definition of the download is “to transfer such as data, files, etc., from one location to another, such as from computer to mobile phone.”
  52. Drag: Drag is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of drag as a transitive verb are “to draw or pull slowly or heavily or haul,” “to bring by or as if by force or compulsion,” “protract,” “to pass a drag over,” “to hit while moving toward first base,” “to select and move by using a mouse, a touch screen, etc,” “to hang or lag behind,” “to fish or search with a drag,” “to trail along on the ground,” “to move slowly because of fatigue,” “to make a plucking or pulling movement,” or “to participate in a drag race.”
  53. Drain: Drain is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of drain are “to draw off gradually or completely,” “to cause the gradual disappearance,” “to exhaust physically or emotionally,” “to empty by drinking the contents,” or “to deplete or empty by or as if by drawing off by degrees or in increments.”
  54. Drip: Drip is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of drip are “to let fall in drops,” “to let out or seem to spill copiously,” “to waft or pass gently,” or “to overflow with or as if with moisture.” 
  55. Drop: Drop is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of drop are “to fall in drops,” “to fall unexpectedly or suddenly or in the form of collapse or death,” “to descend from one line or level to another,” and “to enter or pass as if without conscious effort of will into some state, condition, or activity,” “to cease to be of concern,” “to disappear or dismiss,” or “to be released to the public.”
  56. Eavesdrop: Eavesdrop is an intransitive verb. The definition of eavesdrop is “to furtively listen to what is said in private or to a conversation without them knowing.”
  57. Engage: Engage is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of engage are “to propose as backing to a cause or aim,” “expose to hazard for the attainment or support of some end,” “to entangle or entrap in or as if in a snare or bog,” “to bind by a pledge to marry,” “to provide occupation or involve,” “to arrange to obtain the use or services or to hire,” “‘to hold attention or to engross,” or “to do or take part in something.”
  58. Engulf: Engulf is a transitive verb. The definitions of engulf are “to flow over and enclose or overwhelm” or “to take in by or as if by flowing over or enclosing.” 
  59. Enlarge: Enlarge is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of enlarge are “to make large or extend,” “to give greater scope or expand,” “to set free,” “to grow larger,” or “to speak or write at length or elaborate.” 
  60. Ensnare: Ensnare is a transitive verb. The definitions of ensnare are “to take in or as if in a snare,” “to catch or get control of something or someone,” or “to catch in as in a trap.”
  61. Envelop: Envelop is a transitive verb. The definitions of envelop are “to enclose or enfold totally with or as if with a covering,” or “to surround or partially surround.” 
  62. Erase: Erase is a transitive or an intransitive verb. The definitions of erase are “to rub or scrape out,” “to remove written or drawn marks,” “to remove recorded matter from a magnetic medium, such as magnetic tape,” “ to delete from computer storage,” and “to remove from existence or memory.” 
  63. Escort: Escort is a transitive verb. The definition of escort is “to accompany someone or something to somewhere as an escort, especially for protection or security, or as a mark of rank.” 
  64. Expand: Expand is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of expand are “to open up, unfold, or spread,” “to enhance the extent, number, volume, scope or broaden,” “to express at length or in greater detail,” and “to write out in full or to subject to mathematical expansion,” or “to feel generous or optimistic.” 
  65. Explode: Explode is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of explode are “to burst or shatter with sudden violence or noise as a result of rapid combustion, decomposition, excessive internal pressure, or other processes, typically scattering fragments widely,” “to give forth a sudden strong and noisy outburst of emotion,” “increase suddenly or rapidly in size, number, or extent,” or “show a belief or theory to be safe or unfounded.” 
  66. Explore: Explore is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of explore are “to investigate, study, or analyze or to look into,” “to become familiar with by testing or experimenting,” “to travel over for adventure or discovery,” “to examine especially for diagnostic purposes,” or “to make or conduct a systematic search.”
  67. Expose: Expose is a transitive verb. The definitions of expose are “to deprive of shelter, protection, or care: subject to risk from harmful action or condition,” “to submit or make accessible to a particular action or influence,” and “to abandon, especially by leaving in the open,” “to make known or bring to light,” “to disclose the faults or crimes,” or “to cause to be visible or open to view or display.”
  68. Extend: Extend is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of “extend” are “to spread, stretch forth or unbend,” “to stretch out to the maximum length,” “to take possession by a writ of extent,” “to make the offer or proffer,” “to cause to reach,” “to cause to be longer or prolong,” ‘advance or further,” ”to cause to be of greater area or volume or enlarge,” to increase the scope, meaning, or application or broaden,” or “to stretch out in the distance, space, or time or reach.”
  69. Extract: Extract is a transitive verb. The definitions of extract are “to draw forth,” “to pull or take out forcibly,” “to obtain by much effort from someone unwilling,” “to withdraw by a physical or chemical process,” “to separate from an ore,” “to determine by calculation,” or “to select and copy out or cite.”
  70. Eyeball: Eyeball is a transitive verb. The definition of eyeball is “to look at intently, especially when evaluating or choosing.” 
  71. Fight: Fight is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of fight are “to contend in battle or physical combat,” “wage or combat,” “to struggle to endure or surmount,” “to resolve by struggle,” “to put forth a determined effort,” “to manage in battle or storm,” or “to oppose or to attempt to prevent.”
  72. Fish: Fish is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of fish are “to attempt to catch a fish,” “to seek something by the roundabout,” “to search for something underwater,” “to engage in a search by groping or feeling,” or “to pull or draw as if fishing.”
  73. Fling: Fling is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of fling are “to move in a brusque or headlong manner,” “to kick or plunge vigorously,” “to throw forcefully, impetuously, or casually,” “to cast as if by throwing,” “to place or send suddenly and unceremoniously,” or “to give unrestrained.”
  74. Fly: Fly is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of fly are “to move in or pass through the air with wings,” “to move through the air or before the wind or through outer space,” “to take a flight,” “to fade and disappear or vanish,” “to move, pass, or spread quickly,” “to be moved with sudden extreme emotion,” “to float, wave, or soar in the air,” “to become expended or dissipated rapidly,” or “to flee or escape from.”
  75. Frown: Frown is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of frown are “to contract the brow in displeasure or concentration” or “to give evidence of displeasure or disapproval by or as if by facial expression.”
  76. Fuse: Fuse is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of fuse are “to decrease to a liquid or plastic state by heat,” “to blend thoroughly by or by melting together or combine,” or “to stitch by applying heat and pressure with or without the use of an adhesive.” 
  77. Garble: Garble is a transitive verb. The definitions of garble are “to modify or distort as to make an incorrect impression or shift the meaning,” “to introduce textual error into a message by inaccurate encipherment, transmission, or decipherment,” or “to sift impurities.” 
  78. Gaze: Gaze is an intransitive verb. The definition of gaze is “to fix the eyes in a steady intent look, often with eagerness or studious attention.” 
  79. Glare: Glare is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of glare are “to shine with a harsh uncomfortably brilliant light,” “stand out or obtrude,” “to stare angrily or fiercely,” or “to cause to be sharply reflected.” 
  80. Gleam: Gleam is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of gleam are “to shine with or as if with subdued steady light or moderate brightness,” “to appear briefly or faintly,” or “to cause to gleam.”
  81. Glisten: Glisten is an intransitive verb. The definitions of glisten are “to give off a sparkling or lustrous reflection,” “to gleam by reflecting light,” and “shine, glitter, or gloss.”
  82. Glitter: Glitter is an intransitive verb. The definitions of glitter are “to shine by reflection with many small flashes of brilliant light or sparkle,” “to shine with strong emotion or flash,” “to be superficially attractive or exciting,” or “to be brilliantly attractive, luxurious, or magnificent.” 
  83. Gobble: Gobble is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of gobble are “to swallow or eat greedily,” “to take eagerly or grab,” “to read rapidly or greedily,” “to make the natural guttural noise of a male turkey,” or “to make a sound resembling the gobble of a turkey.” 
  84. Govern: Govern is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of govern are “to exercise constant authority over,” “to rule and direct the making and administration of policy,” “to control the speed of a machine, especially by automatic,” and “to control, direct, or strongly influence the actions and conduct,” “to hold in check or restrain,” or “to exercise authority.”
  85. Grasp: Grasp is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of grasp are “to make the motion of seizing or clutch,” “to take or seize eagerly,” “to clasp or embrace especially with the fingers or arms,” or “to lay hold of with the mind or comprehend.”
  86. Gravitate: Gravitate is an intransitive verb. The definitions of gravitate are “to travel under the influence of gravitation,” “to move toward something,” or “to be pulled or captivated especially by natural inclination.” 
  87. Grip: Grip is a transitive verb. The definitions of grip are “to seize or hold firmly” or “to hold the interest of strongly.”
  88. Groan: Groan is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of groan are “to utter a deep moan demonstrative of pain, grief, or annoyance” or “to make a harsh sound, as of creaking, under sudden or prolonged strain.”
  89. Grope: Grope is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of grope are “to feel about blindly or uncertainly in search,” “to look for something blindly or uncertainly,” “to feel one’s way,” “feel up,” or “to find one’s way by groping.” 
  90. Growl:Growl is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of growl are “rumble,” “to utter a growl,” “to complain angrily,” or “to utter with a growl or utter angrily.”
  91. Guide: Guide is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the guide are “to act as a guide or direct in a way or course,” “to direct, supervise, or influence usually to a particular end,” “to superintend the training or instruction,” or “to act or work as a guide.”
  92. Gush: Gush is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of gush are “to issue copiously or violently,” “to emit a sudden copious flow,” “to make an effusive display of affection or enthusiasm,” or “to say or write effusively.” 
  93. Hack: Hack is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hack are “to make chopping strokes or blows,” “to play inexpert golf,” “to cough in a short dry manner,” “loaf, commonly used with ‘around,’” “to write computer programs for enjoyment,” or “to gain access to a computer illegally.” 
  94. Hail: Hail is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hail are “to precipitate,” “to pour down or strike like hail,” “to greet with enthusiastic approval or acclaim,” “salute or greet,” or “to greet or summon by calling.”
  95. Heighten: Heighten is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of heighten are “to increase the amount or degree or augment,” “to make brighter or more intense or deepen,” “to bring out more strongly or point up,” “to make more acute or sharpen,” or “elevate or to raise high or higher.” 
  96. Hobble: Hobble is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hobble are “to move along shakily or with problem,” “to cause to limp or cripple,” “to fasten together the legs of an animal to prevent straying,” and “to place under handicap or hamper, impede.”
  97. Hover: Hover is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hover are “to position a computer cursor over something, such as an image or icon without selecting it,” “to hang fluttering in the air or on the wing,” “to remain suspended over a place or object,” “to move to and fro near a place or fluctuate around a given point,” or “to be in a state of uncertainty, irresolution, or suspense.”
  98. Hurry: Hurry is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hurry are “to carry or cause going with speed,” “to force to rash or precipitate action,” “to impel to greater speed or prod,” “expedite,” or “to perform, with undue haste.”
  99. Ignite: Ignite is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of ignite are “to set afire,” “to subject to fire or intense heat,” “to cause a fuel to burn,” “to heat up or excite,” “to set in motion or spark,” or “to begin to glow.” 
  100. Illuminate: Illuminate is a transitive verb. The definitions of illuminate are “to supply or brighten with light,” “to enlighten spiritually or intellectual,” “to subject to radiation,” “to make clear or elucidate,” “to bring to the fore or highlight,” “to make illustrious or resplendent,” or “to decorate with gold or silver or brilliant colors or with often elaborate designs or miniature pictures.”
  101. Inspect: Inspect is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of inspect are “to view closely in critical appraisal or look over,” “to examine officially,” or “to make an inspection.”
  102. Instruct: Instruct is a transitive verb. The definitions of instruct are “to provide knowledge, teach or train,” “to supply with authoritative information or advice,” or “to give an order or command or direct.” 
  103. Intensify: Intensify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of intensify are “to create intense or more comprehensive or strengthen,” “to create more keen or sharpen,” or “to boost the density and contrast of a photographic image by chemical treatment.”
  104. Intertwine: Intertwine is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of intertwine are “to unite by twinning one with another,” “to twine about one another,” or “to become mutually involved.” 
  105. Impart: Impart is a transitive verb. The definitions of impart are “to give, convey, or grant from or as if from a store,” “to give something to a thing,” “to make something known to someone,” or “to communicate the knowledge or disclose.” 
  106. Jostle: Jostle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of jostle are “to come in contract or into collision,” “to make one’s way by pushing and shoving,” “to exist in proximity,” “to vie in gaining an objective or contend,” or “to stir up or agitate.” 
  107. Journey: Journey is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of journey is “to go on a journey or travel.” 
  108. Lash: Lash is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of lash are “to move intensely or unexpectedly or hurry,” “to thrash or beat violently,” “to make a verbal attack or retort,” “to strike or beat with or as if with a whip,” or “to assail with stinging words.” 
  109. Launch: Launch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of launch are “to throw ahead or hurl,” “to deliver, catapult, or transmit,” “to set a boat or ship afloat,” “to give a start,” “to put into operation or set in motion or initiate or introduce,” to get off a good start,” “to load into a computer’s memory and run,” “to enter energetically,” or “to slide down the ways.” 
  110. Lead: Lead is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of lead are “to guide on the way especially by going in advance,” “to direct on a course or in a direction,” “to serve as a channel,” “to go through or live,” “to direct the operations, activity, or performance,” “to suggest to a witness the answer desired by asking leading questions,” “to bring to some conclusion or condition,” “to begin to play with,” or “to aim in front of a moving object.” 
  111. Leap: Leap is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of leap are “to spring free from or as if from the ground or jump,” “to pass abruptly from one state or topic to another,” “to act precipitately,” “to provide help, protection, very quickly,” or “to pass over by leaping.”
  112. Locate: Locate is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of locate are “to establish oneself or one’s business or settle,” “to determine or indicate the place, site, or limits,” “to set or establish in a particular spot or station,” “to seek out and determine the location,” or “to find or fix the place of especially in a sequence or classify.” 
  113. Lurch: Lurch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of lurch are “to move with a lurch,” “stagger,” “to roll or tip abruptly or pitch,” “to defeat by a lurch,” “cheat or steal,” or “to loiter about a place furtively or prowl.” 
  114. Lurk: Lurk is an intransitive verb. The definitions of lurk are “to lie in wait in a place of concealment especially for an evil purpose,” “to move furtively or inconspicuously,” “to persist in staying,” “to be concealed but capable of being discovered,” “to lie hidden,” or “to read messages without contributing on an internet discussion forum.” 
  115. Magnify: Magnify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of magnify are “extol or laud,” “to cause to be held in greater esteem or respect,” “to increase in significance or intensify,” “exaggerate,” “to enlarge in fact or appearance,” or “to have the power of causing objects to appear larger than they are.” 
  116. Mimic: Mimic is a transitive verb. The definitions of mimic are “to imitate closely or ape,” “to ridicule by imitation,” “stimulate,” or “to resemble by biological mimicry.” 
  117. Mint: Mint is a transitive verb. The definitions of mint are “to make coins or money out of metal,” “create or produce,” or “to cause to attain an indicated status.” 
  118. Moan: Moan is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of moan are “to bewail audibly or lament,” “to utter with moans,” “complain,” “to make a moan or groan,” or “to emit a sound resembling a moan.” 
  119. Modify: Modify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of modify are “to make less extreme or moderate,” “to limit or add to its meaning especially in a grammatical construction,” “to change by an umlaut,” “to make minor changes,” or “to make basic or fundamental changes in often to give a new orientation to or to serve a new end.”
  120. Multiply: Multiply is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of multiply are “to expand in number in multiples or enlarge,” “to look the product of by multiplication,” “to use as a multiplicand in multiplication with another number,” “to become greater or spread,” “breed or propagate,” or “to execute multiplication.” 
  121. Muse: Muse is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of muse are “to become absorbed in thought,” “to think about something carefully and thoroughly,” “wonder or marvel,” or “to think or say thoughtfully.”
  122. Mushroom: Mushroom is an intransitive verb. The definitions of mushroom are “to well up and disperse laterally from a main source,” “to become increased or extensive or grow rapidly,” “to collect wild mushrooms,” or “to spring up suddenly or multiply rapidly.”
  123. Mystify: Mystify is a transitive verb. The definitions of mystify are “to perplex the mind or bewilder” or “to make mysterious or obscure.” 
  124. Notice: Notice is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of notice are “to give notice,” “to comment upon,” “to treat with attention or civility,” “to become aware of something or someone,” or “to give a formal notice.”
  125. Notify: Notify is a transitive verb. The definitions of notify are “to give formal notice,” “to give notice of or report the occurrence of,” or “to point out.”
  126. Obtain: Obtain is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of obtain are “to gain or usually attain by planned action or effort” or “to be generally recognized or established or prevail.”
  127. Oppress: Oppress is a transitive verb. The definitions of oppress are “to crush or burden by control or power or authority,” “suppress,” or “to burden spiritually or mentally, weigh heavily upon.” 
  128. Order: Order is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of order are “to put in order or arrange,” “to give an order or command,” “destine or ordain,” “to command to go or come to a specified place,” or “regulate.” 
  129. Paint: Paint is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of paint are “to apply color, pigment, or paint,” “to apply with a movement resembling that used in painting,” “to treat with a liquid by brushing or swabbing,” and “to depict by such lines and colors,” “to touch up or cover over by or as if by painting,” “to depict as having specified or implied characteristics,” or “to use cosmetics.” 
  130. Park: Park is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of park are “to enclose in a park,” “to bring a vehicle to a stop and keep standing at the edge of a public way,” “to leave temporarily on a public way or in a parking lot or garage,” “to land and leave an aircraft in an assigned or accessible location,” “to establish something, such as a satellite in orbit,” “to set and leave temporarily,” or “to place, settle, or establish especially for a considerable time.”
  131. Peck: Peck is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of peck are “to strike or pierce especially repeatedly with the bill or a pointed tool,” “to kiss someone quickly,” “to give some “to make by pecking,” “to pick up with the bill,” “carp or nag,” or “to eat reluctantly and in small bites.”
  132. Peek: Peek is an intransitive verb. The definitions of peek are “to look furtively,” “to peer through a crack or hole or from a place, or concealment,” or “to take a brief look or glance.”
  133. Peer: Peer is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of peer are “to look narrowly or curiously,” “to look searchingly at something difficult to discern, or squint to see more clearly,” “to come slightly into view, emerge partly,” or “rival or match.” 
  134. Perceive: Perceive is a transitive verb. The definitions of perceive are “to attain awareness or understanding,” “to regard as being such,” “to become aware of through the senses,” or “see or observe.” 
  135. Picture: Picture is a transitive verb. The definitions of picture are “to form a mental image or imagine,” “to describe graphically in words,” or “to paint or draw a representation, image, or visual conception, or depict.” 
  136. Pilot: Pilot is a transitive verb. The definitions of pilot are “to act as a guide to or lead or conduct over a usually difficult course,” “to set and conn the course of,” or “to act as pilot.” 
  137. Pinpoint: Pinpoint is a transitive verb. The definitions of pinpoint are “to locate or aim with great precision or accuracy,” “to fix, determine, or identify with precision,” or “to cause to stand out conspicuously or highlight.”
  138. Place: Place is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of place are “to put in a particular place or position,” “to present for consideration,” “to put in a particular state,” “to direct to the desired spot,” and “to cause to produce free and well-resonated singing or speaking tones,” “to assign to a position in a series or category,” or “to distribute in an orderly manner or arrange.”
  139. Plant: Plant is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of plant are “to put or set in the ground for growth,” “to set or sow with seeds or plants,” “implant,” “establish or institute,” or “to covertly place for discovery, publication, or dissemination.”
  140. Plop: Plop is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of plop are “to fall, drop, or flick with a sound like that of something dropping into water,” “to allow the body to drop heavily,” or “to place or set carelessly or hastily.” 
  141. Pluck: Pluck is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of pluck are “to pull or pick off or out,” “to remove something such as hairs,” “rob or fleece,” “to move, remove, or separate forcibly or abruptly,” “to play by surrounding the strings with the fingers or a pick,” or “to make a sharp pull or twitch.”
  142. Plunge: Plunge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of plunge are “to cause to infiltrate or enter rapidly and forcefully into something,” “to cause to enter a state or course of action, usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently,” “to fall or drop suddenly in amount, value, etc.,” “to thrust or cast oneself into a water,” “to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,” or “to descend or dip suddenly.”
  143. Poison: Poison is a transitive verb. The definitions of poison are “to injure or kill with poison,” “to treat, taint, or impregnate with or as if with poison,” “to have a bad effect on something,” “to exert a harmful influence on or corrupt,” or “to inhibit the activity, course, or occurrence of.”
  144. Pop: Pop is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of pop are “to punch or knock sharply or hit,” “to push, put, or thrust suddenly or briefly,” “to cause exploding or burst open,” “to fire at or shoot,” and “to flip something into an upturned position.”
  145. Position: Position is a transitive verb. The definition of position is “to put something or someone in a certain position.” 
  146. Power: Power is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of power are “to supply with power and especially motive power,” “to give impetus to,” or “to move with great speed or force.”
  147. Prickle: Prickle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of prickle are “to prick slightly,” “to cause or experience an unpleasant feeling of having many small, sharp points against the skin,” “to experience a burning or cold feeling caused by a strong emotion,” or “to produce prickles in.” 
  148. Probe: Probe is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the probe are “to search into and study completely or subject to a penetrating investigation” or “to examine with a probe.”
  149. Prune: Prune is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of prune are “to reduce, especially by eliminating superfluous matter” or “to cut off parts for better shape or more fruitful growth.” 
  150. Realize: Realize is a transitive verb. The definitions of realize are “to bring into concrete existence or accomplish,” “to cause to seem real or appear real,” “to be sold for a particular amount of money,” “to convert into actual money,” “to bring or get by sale, investment, or effort or gain,” or “to conceive vividly as real or be fully aware.” 
  151. Recite: Recite is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of recite are “to repeat from memory or read aloud publicly,” “to relate in full,” “to give a recital of or detail,” or “to repeat or answer questions about a lesson.” 
  152. Recoil: Recoil is an intransitive verb. The definitions of recoil are “to retreat under pressure,” “to shrink back physically or emotionally,” “to bounce back to or as if to a starting point or rebound,” or “degenerate.” 
  153. Refashion: Refashion is a transitive verb. The definitions of refashion are “fashion something again or differently” or “remake or alter.” 
  154. Refine: Refine is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of refine are “to free from impurities or undesired material,” “to free from moral flaw or elevate,” “to improve or perfect by pruning or polishing,” “to reduce in vigor or intensify,” “to free from what is coarse, vulgar, or uncouth,” or “to become pure or perfected.” 
  155. Remove: Remove is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of remove are “to change the location, position, station, or residence of,” “to transfer a legal proceeding from one court to another,” “to move by lifting, pushing aside or taking away or off,” “to dismiss from office,” “to get rid of or eliminate,” or “to be capable of being removed.”
  156. Report: Report is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of report are “to give an account of or relate,” “to describe as being in a specified state,” “to serve as a carrier of a message,” “to make a written record or summary of,” “to prepare or present an account of for broadcast,” “to give a formal or official account or statement of,” “to announce or relate as the result of the investigation,” or “to make known to the proper authorities.” 
  157. Retreat: Retreat is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of retreat are “to make a retreat or withdraw,” “to slope backward,” “to draw or lead back or remove,” or “to move back.”
  158. Reveal: Reveal is a transitive verb. The definitions of reveal are “to make known through divine inspiration,” “to make publicly or generally known,” or “to open up to view or display.” 
  159. Reverberate: Reverberate is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of reverberate are “reflect,” “repel,” “echo,” “to become driven back,” “to cause effects afterward,” “to become reflected,” or “to continue in or as if in a series of echoes or resound.” 
  160. Revitalize: Revitalize is a transitive verb. The definitions of revitalize are “to give a new life or vigor to,” “to make something grow, develop, or become successful again,” or “to put new life or energy into something.”
  161. Revolutionize: Revolutionize is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of revolutionize are “to bring down the government,” “to infuse with revolutionary beliefs,” “to modify fundamentally or completely,” or “to involve in revolution.”
  162. Revolve: Revolve is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of revolve are “to turn over at length in mind or ponder,” “to cause going around in orbit,” “recur,” “to ponder something,” to remain under construction,” “to move in a curved path around a center or axis,” or “to have or come to a specified focus or center.”
  163. Rip: Rip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of rip are “to tear or split apart or open,” “to saw or split with the grain,” “to hit sharply,” “to utter violently or spit out,” criticize or disparage,” “to become ripped or rend,” or “to rush headlong.”
  164. Rise: Rise is an intransitive verb. The definitions of rise are “to assume an upright position such as from lying, kneeling, or sitting,” “to return from death,” “to take up arms,” “to respond warmly or applaud,” “to end a session or adjourn,” “to appear above the horizon,” “to move upward or ascend,” “to extend above other objects,” “to increase in fervor or intensify,” “to attain a higher level or rank,” “to take place or happen,” “to follow as a consequence or result,” or “to exert oneself to meet a challenge.”
  165. Ruin: Ruin is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of ruin are “to damage irreparably,” “bankrupt or impoverish,” “to cause someone to lose money, social status, etc.,” “to subject to frustration, failure, or disaster,” “to reduce to ruins or devastate,” or “to become ruined.” 
  166. Rush: Rush is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of rush are “to move ahead, advancement, or act with speed or eagerness or without preparation,” “to advance a football by running plays,” “to push or impel on or forward with speed, impetuosity, or violence,” “to perform in a short time or at high speed,” “to urge to an unnatural or extreme speed,” “to run toward or against in attack or charge,” “to carry forward in a running play,” or “to lavish attention or court.” 
  167. Rust: Rust is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of rust are “to form rust or become oxidized,” “to degenerate especially from inaction, lack of use, or passage of time,” “to become reddish brown as if with rust,” and “to be affected with a rust fungus,” “to impair or corrode by as if by time, inactivity, or deleterious use,” or “to cause to become reddish brown or turn the color of rust.” 
  168. Saunter: Saunter is an intransitive verb. The definition of saunter is “to walk about in an idle or leisurely manner or stroll.”
  169. Scamper: Scamper is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of scamper is “to run nimbly and usually playfully about.” 
  170. Scan: Scan is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the scan are “to read or mark to show metrical structure,” “to examine by point-by-point observation or checking,” “to systematically examine to obtain data, especially for display or storage,” “to pass over in the formation of an image,” “to scan verse,” or “to conform to a metrical pattern.” 
  171. Scorch: Scorch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of scorch are “to burn a surface to change its color and texture,” “to dry or wither with intense heat or parch,” “to afflict distressingly with censure or sarcasm,” “to destroy before abandoning or devastate,” “to move or travel at great and usually excessive speed,” or “to cause intense heat or mental anguish.” 
  172. Scrape: Scrape is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of scrape are “to eliminate from a surface by usually repeated strokes of a sharpened instrument,” “to create smooth or clean with strokes of an edged instrument or an abrasive,” “to grate harshly over or against,” “to damage or injure the surface of by contact with a rough surface,” “to draw roughly or noisily over a surface,” “to collect by scraping,” “to accumulate money by small economies,” or “to make one’s way with difficulty or barely manage or succeed.”
  173. Scratch: Scratch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of scratch are “to poke with the claws or nails,” “to scrub and tear or mark the surface of with something sharp or jagged,” “to rub gently,” and “to scrape together or collect with difficulty or by effort,” “to write or draw on a surface,” “to cancel or erase by or as if by drawing a line through,” “scribble or scrawl,” or “to scrape a rugged surface.” 
  174. Scrawl: Scrawl is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of scrawl is “to write or draw awkwardly, hastily, or carelessly.” 
  175. Seize: Seize is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of seize are “to bestow ownership of a freehold estate,” “to keep something,” “take away,” “capture,” “hold,” “apprehend,” “afflict,” “to bind or fasten together with a lashing of small stuff,” “to take or lay hold suddenly or forcibly,” “to cohere to a relatively moving part through excessive pressure, temperature, or friction,” or “to fail to function due to the seizing of a part.” 
  176. Serve: Serve is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of serve are “to be a servant,” “to assistant or as a server at mass,” “to be of use,” “to be advantageous, fortunate, or convenient,” and “to be worthy of reliance or trust,” “to hold an office or discharge a duty or function,” “to prove adequate or satisfactory or suffice,” “to provide something” “to put the ball or shuttlecock in play,” “suffice,” “to bring to notice, deliver, or execute as required by law,” or “to copulate with.” 
  177. Shatter: Shatter is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shatter are “to cause dropping or be spread,” “to break into pieces,” “destroy or wreck,” “to break apart or disintegrate,” or “to drop off a part.” 
  178. Shepherd: Shepherd is a transitive verb. The definitions of shepherd are “to tend as a shepherd,” “to watch over carefully,” or “to guide or guard in the manner of a shepherd.” 
  179. Shimmer: Shimmer is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shimmer are “to glow with a soft trembling light or glimmer,” “to reflect an uncertain distorted visual image,” or “to cause a shimmer.”
  180. Shine: Shine is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shine are “to emit rays of light,” “to be bright by the reflection of light,” “to be eminent, conspicuous, or distinguished,” “to perform extremely well,” “to have a bright glowing appearance,” or “to be conspicuously evident or clear.” 
  181. Shock: Shock is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shock are “to strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust,” “to cause to undergo a physical or nervous shock,” ”to offend or upset someone by doing or saying something immoral or unacceptable,” “to subject to the action of an electrical discharge,” “to drive by a shock,” “to cause surprise or shock,” “to meet with a shock or collide,” or “to meet with a shock or collide.” 
  182. Shrivel: Shrivel is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shrivel are “to draw into wrinkles, especially with a loss of moisture,” “to become much smaller than is needed or wanted,” “to become reduced to inanition, helplessness, or inefficiency,” or “to cause to shrivel.”
  183. Sizzle: Sizzle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sizzle are “to burn up or sear with or as if with a hissing sound,” “to make a sound like food cooking in hot fat,” “to be interesting or exciting,” “to be very sexually attractive,” “to be very hot,” or “to seethe with deep anger or resentment.” 
  184. Skip: Skip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of skip are “to move or proceed with leaps and bounds or with a skip,” “to bound off one point after another or ricochet,” “to leave quickly or secretly,” “to pass over or omit an internal, item, or step,” or “to pass over without notice or mention or omit.”
  185. Skulk: Skulk is an intransitive verb. The definitions of skulk are “to move stealthily or furtively” or “to hide or conceal something, often out of cowardice or fear or with sinister intent.” 
  186. Slash: Slash is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slash are “to lash out, cut, or thrash about with or as if with an edged blade,” “to cut with or as if with rough sweeping strokes,” “cane or lash,” “to cut slits to reveal a color beneath,” “to criticize cuttingly,” or “to reduce sharply, or cut.” 
  187. Slide: Slide is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slide are “to move smoothly along a surface or slip,” “to slip or fall by loss of footing,” “to change position or become dislocated or shift,” “to slither along the ground or crawl,” “to hand, pass along, or slip easily or quietly,” “to stream along or flow,” “to pass unnoticed or unremarked,” or “to pass unobtrusively or steal.”
  188. Slink: Slink is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slink are “to go or move quietly or privately or steal,” “to move in a sinuous provocative manner,” or “to give premature birth.”
  189. Slip: Slip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slip are “to move with a smooth sliding motion,” “to move quietly and cautiously or steal,” “elapse or pass,” “to escape from memory or consciousness,” “to become uttered through inadvertence,” “to fall into error or fault or lapse,” “to slide out of place or away from a support or one’s grasp,” “to get speedily into or out of clothing,” “to fall off from a standard or accustomed level by degrees or decline,” or “to get away from.” 
  190. Slump: Slump is an intransitive verb. The definitions of slump are “to fall or sink suddenly,” “to drop or slide down suddenly or collapse,” “to assume a drooping posture or carriage or slouch,” or “to go into a slump.”
  191. Slurp: Slurp is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of slurp is “to make a sipping sound while eating or drinking.” 
  192. Smash: Smash is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of smash are “to break or crush by violence,” “to drive or throw violently, especially with a shattering or battering effect,” “batter,” “to destroy utterly or wreck,” or “to move or become propelled with violence or crashing effect.” 
  193. Smite: Smite is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of smite are “to hit harshly or strongly, mainly with the palm or hold in the palm,” “to murder or badly injure by smiting,” “to cause to beat,” “to affect as if by striking,” “capture or seize,” or “to deliver or deal a blow with or as if with the hand or something held.” 
  194. Snag: Snag is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of snag are “a concealed or unexpected difficulty or obstacle,” “an irregularity that suggests the result of tearing,” “a rough sharp or jagged projecting part or protuberance,” and “to catch, capture, or get by quick action,” or “a standing dead tree.” 
  195. Snarl: Snarl is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of snarl are “to cause to become knotted or intertwined or tangle,” “say something in an angry, bad-tempered voice,” “make an aggressive growl with bared teeth,” “to make excessively complicated,” or “to become snarled.” 
  196. Sneak: Sneak is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sneak are “to go stealthily or furtively or slink,” “to act in or as if in a furtive manner,” “to carry the football on a quarterback sneak,” or “to put, bring, or take furtively or artfully.”
  197. Snowball: Snowball is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of snowball are “to increase, accumulate, expand, or multiply at a quickly accelerating rate” or “to attack with snowballs or to throw snowballs at.” 
  198. Soar: Soar is an intransitive verb. The definitions of soar are “to fly above or about,” “to float or hang in the air often at a great height or glide,” “to rise or increase dramatically,” “to ascend to a higher or more exalted level,” or “to rise to majestic stature.”
  199. Spam: Spam is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of spam are “to send someone an advertisement by email that they do not want” or “to send or post spam to.” 
  200. Sparkle: Sparkle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sparkle are “to discard sparks,” “to radiate or reflect bright moving points of lights,” “to perform brilliantly,” “effervesce,” “to become lively or animated,” or “to cause to glitter or shine.” 
  201. Sport: Sport is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sport are “to amuse oneself or frolic,” “to engage in a sport,” “to mock or ridicule something,” “to speak or act in jest or trifle,” “mutate,” “to display or wear something proudly,” or “to put forth as a sport or bud variation.”
  202. Sprinkle: Sprinkle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sprinkle are “to scatter in drops or particles,” “to scatter over,” “to scatter at intervals in,” “to wet lightly,” or “to rain lightly in scattered drops.”
  203. Stare: Stare is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stare are “to look fixedly often with wide-open eyes,” “to show oneself prominently,” “to stand on end or bristle,” “to have an effect on by staring,” or “to look at with a searching or earnest gaze.” 
  204. Starve: Starve is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of starve are “to perish from the food shortage,” “to die of freeze,” “to experience or perish from deprivation,” or “to kill with hunger.” 
  205. Steal: Steal is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of steal are “to get something unlawfully and especially as a routine or normal habit,” “to come or go furtively, quietly or surprisingly,” “to carry out by force or unjust means,” “to move, transmit, or present secretly or smuggle,” or “to capture, obtain, or win by trickery, skill, or daring,” or “to make it to the base securely only by running and usually catching the opposing team off guard.” 
  206. Steer: Steer is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of steer are “to control the course or direct,” “to set and hold to a course,” “to direct the course of a ship or automobile,” “to pursue a course of action,” or “to be subject to steering.” 
  207. Storm: Storm is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the storm are “to blow with violence,” “to rain, hail, snow, or sleet vigorously,” “to attack by storm,” “to be in or to exhibit a violent passion or rage,” “to rush about or move impetuously, violently, or angrily.” 
  208. Strain: Strain is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of strain are “to tighten or cause fitting strongly,” “to spread to maximum extension and tautness,” “to exert to the utmost,” “to injure by overuse, misuse, or excessive pressure,” “to cause a change of form or size in a body by application of external force,” “to separate the liquid part from the solid parts,” “hug,” “constrict,” “to stretch beyond the proper limit,” “to cause to pass through a strainer or filter,” “to make violent efforts or strive,” or to make great difficulty or resistance or balk.” 
  209. Stretch: Stretch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stretch are “to extend one’s limbs, one’s body, etc. in a reclining position,” “to reach out or extend,” “to extend in length,” “to amplify beyond natural or proper limits,” “to fell with or as if with blow,” “to cause the limbs of a person to be pulled especially in torture,” “to pull taut,” “to enlarge or distend especially by force,” “to cause to reach or continue,” “to extend in length,” or “spread.” 
  210. Strip: Strip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the strip are “to remove clothing, covering, or surface matter from,” “to take away someone’s property, rights or titles,” “to divest of honors, privileges, or functions,” “to remove extraneous or superficial matter from,” “to make bare or clear,” “to finish a milking of by pressing the last available milk from the teats,” “to remove cured leaves from the stalks of tobacco,” “to tear or damage the thread,” “to separate from a mixture or solution,” or “to remove using a surgical instrument.” 
  211. Stroll: Stroll is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stroll are “to go from place to place in search of work or profit,” “to walk in a leisurely or idle manner or ramble,” or “to walk at leisure along or about.” 
  212. Struggle: Struggle is an intransitive verb. The definitions of struggle are “to make difficult or intense efforts in the face of challenges or opposition,” “to use a lot of effort to defeat someone, prevent something, or achieve something, “or “to proceed with difficulty or with great effort.” 
  213. Stumble: Stumble is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stumble are “to fall into sin or waywardness,” “to make an error or blunder,” “to come to an obstacle to belief,” “to walk unsteadily or clumsily,” “to speak or act in a hesitant or faltering manner,” “to come unexpectedly or by chance,” “to cause to stumble or trip,” or “bewilder or confound.” 
  214. Supercharge: Supercharge is a transitive verb. The definitions of supercharge are “to charge greatly or excessively as with vigor or tension,” “to make an engine more powerful by forcing in more air and fuel than usual,” “boost,” or “pressurize.”
  215. Supersize: Supersize is a transitive verb. The definitions of supersize are “to greatly increase the size of something or someone” or “to make something or someone supersized.”
  216. Surge: Surge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of surge are “to up and down actively or toss,” “to lift and move in waves or billows or increase,” “to slip around a windlass, capstan, or bitts,” to rise suddenly to an excessive or abnormal value,” “to move with a surge or in surges,” or “to let go or slacken gradually.”
  217. Survey: Survey is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of survey are “to examine as to condition, situation or value or appraise,” “to query someone in order to collect data for the analysis of some aspect of a group or area,” “to determine the form, extent, and position by taking linear and angular measurements and by applying the principles of geometry and trigonometry,” “to ask people questions to find out about their opinions or behavior,” or “inspect or scrutinize.”
  218. Swell: Swell is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of swell are “to expand gradually beyond a normal or original limit,” “to become distended or puffed up,” “to form a bulge or rounded elevation,” ‘to become filled with pride and arrogance,” “to become distended with emotion,” or “to affect with a powerful or expansive emotion.”
  219. Swipe: Swipe is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of swipe are “to strike or move with a sweeping motion,” “to operate something by sliding one’s finger while pressing against a touch screen,” “to strike or wipe with a sweeping motion,” “to activate or control with a swiping gesture,” “steal or pilfer,” or “to slide through as slot in a reading device so that information contained in the strip or code are able to processed.” 
  220. Swoon: Swoon is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of swoon are “to move with a sweep,” “to faint or be unconscious,” “to feel a lot of pressure, love, etc. because of something or someone,” or “to gain or carry off in or as if in a swoop.”
  221. Tail: Tail is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of tail are “to follow for purposes of surveillance,” “to connect end to end,” “to make or furnish with a tail,” “to secretly follow and watch someone,” and “to form or move in a straggling line,” “to grow progressively smaller, fainter, or more scattered or abate,” or “to swing or lie with the stern in a named direction.” 
  222. Tattle: Tattle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of tattle are “to tell secrets about what someone else has done or blab,” “chatter or prate,” or “to utter or disclose in gossip or chatter.” 
  223. Toddle: Toddle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of toddle are “to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child” or “to take a stroll or saunter.”
  224. Transfigure: Transfigure is a transitive verb. The definitions of transfigure are “to deliver a new and usually exalted or spiritual form or change externally and mostly for the better” or “to change into something great or beautiful.” 
  225. Transform: Transform is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of transform are “to change in composition or structure,” “to change the outward form or appearance of,” “to change in character or condition or convert,” “to subject to mathematical transformation,” “to cause a cell to undergo a genetic transformation,” or “to become transformed or change.” 
  226. Travel: Travel is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of travel are “to go on or as if on a trip or tour or journey,” “pass,” “associate,” “to go place to place,” and “to move in a given direction or path or through a given distance,” “to move quickly,” “to take more steps while holding a basketball than the rules allow,” “to traverse,” or “to cover an area as a commercial traveler.” 
  227. Treat: Treat is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of treat are “to handle with in speech or writing or explain,” “to submit or represent artistically,” “to deal with or handle,” “to bear oneself toward or use,” “to regard and deal with in a specified manner,” “to provide with free food, drink, or entertainment,” “to use drugs, exercises, etc., to cure a person of a disease or heal an injury,” “to provide another’s expenses,” “to discuss or negotiate.” 
  228. Trim: Trim is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of trim are “to remove by or as if by cutting,” “to make trim and neat, especially by cutting or clipping,” “to reduce the amount or size of something,” and “to embellish with or as if with ribbons, lace, or ornaments,” “to administer a beating to or thrash,” “defeat,” or “to cause to assume a desirable position in the water by the arrangement of ballast, cargo, or passengers.” 
  229. Trip: Trip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of trip are “to catch the foot against something to stumble,” “to make an error or false step,” “to dance, skip, or caper with light, quick steps,” “to scramble in pronunciation when speaking,” “to make a journey,” “to activate a mechanism,” “to get high on a psychedelic drug,” “to release or operate,” “to raise an anchor from the bottom,” “to pull a yard into a perpendicular position for lowering,” or “to hoist a topmast far enough to enable the fid to be withdrawn preparatory to housing or lowering.” 
  230. Trudge: Trudge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of trudge are “to walk or march steadily and usually laboriously,” “to walk slowly with heavy steps especially because of tiredness or unhappy,” or “to trudge along or over.” 
  231. Tussle: Tussle is an intransitive verb. The definitions of tussle are “to have hard conflict or strong debate,” “to fight with another person using arms or body,” or “to struggle roughly or scuffle.” 
  232. Uncover: Uncover is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of uncover are “to make known, bring to light, disclose or reveal,” “to expose to view by removing some covering,” “to take the cover from,” “to remove the hat from,” or “to deprive of protection.”
  233. Unearth: Unearth is a transitive verb. The definitions of unearth are “to dig up out of as if out of the earth or exhume” or “to make known or public or bring to light.”
  234. Untangle: Untangle is a transitive verb. The definitions of untangle are “to make a complicated subject or problem, or its different parts, clear and able to be understood” or “to loose from tangles or entanglement or straighten out.” 
  235. Unveil: Unveil is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of unveil are “to remove a veil or to cover from,” “to make public, expose or reveal,” or “to throw off a veil or protective cloak.” 
  236. Usher: Usher is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of usher are “to conduct to a place,” ‘to precede as an usher, forerunner, or harbinger,” “to show someone where they should go, often by going with them,” “to serve as an usher,” or “to cause to enter or introduce.”
  237. Veil: Veil is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of veil are “to cover, provide, obscure, or conceal with or as if with a veil” or “to put on or wear a veil.”
  238. Wail: Wail is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wail are “to express sorrow audibly or lament,” “to make a sound suggestive of a mournful cry,” “to express dissatisfaction plaintively or complain,” or “bewail.” 
  239. Weave: Weave is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of weave are “to create cloth by interlacing strings as of yarn,” “to create by intertwining,” “spin,” “to generate by elaborately joining elements or formulate,” “to unite in a coherent whole,” “to introduce as an appropriate element,” or “to direct in a winding or zigzag course especially to avoid obstacles.” 
  240. Wind: Wind is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wind are “to turn completely or repeatedly about an object: coil or twine,” “to encircle or cover with something pliable,” “to raise to a high level, to tighten the spring of,” “to hoist or haul using rope or chain and a windlass,” “to traverse on a curving course,” “entangle or involve,” or “bend or warp.” 
  241. Withdraw: Withdraw is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of withdraw are “to retrieve or gone or eliminate,” “to take out money from a place of deposit,” “to divert from an object of attention,” “to draw back or aside,” to remove from consideration or set outside a group,” take back or retract,” “retire,” “to remove oneself from participation,” or “to become a motion socially under parliamentary procedure.”
  242. Wreck: Wreck is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wreck are “to cast ashore,” “to reduce to a ruinous state by violence,” “shipwreck,” “to ruin, damage, or imperil by a wreck,” “bring about or wreak,” or “to rob, salvage, or repair wreckage or a wreck.” 
  243. Wrench: Wrench is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wrench are “to pull and twist something suddenly or violently away from a fixed position,” “to make somebody feel great pain or unhappiness, especially so that they make a sound or cry,” “to pull or strain at something with violent twisting,” “change,” “distort or pervert,” or “to snatch forcibly or wrest.” 
  244. Wrest: Wrest is a transitive verb. The definitions of wrest are “to pull, force or move by violent wringing or twisting movements” or “gain with difficulty by or as if by force, violence, or determined labor.” 
  245. Wrestle: Wrestle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wrestle are “to fight by struggling with and striving to trip or throw an opponent down or off balance,” “to battle an opposing tendency or force,” “to engage in deep thought, consideration, or debate,” “to engage in a violent or determined struggle,” or “to move maneuver, or force with difficulty.”
  246. Wring: Wring is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wring are “to compress or twist mainly to make dry or to remove moisture or liquid,” “to extract or obtain by twisting and compressing,” “to twist to strain or sprain into a distorted shape,” “to twist together as a sign of anguish,” “torment,” or “squirm or writhe.”
  247. Yank: Yank is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of yank are “to pull or extract with a quick, vigorous movement” or “to remove abruptly.” 
  248. Zing: Zing is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of zing are “to make or move with a humming sound,” “zip or speed,” “to hit suddenly or zap,” or “to criticize in a pointed or witty manner.” 
  249. Zap: Zap is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of zap are “to get rid of, or kill with sudden force,” “to propel suddenly or speedily,” “to use the remote control to change television channels quickly,” “to hit with a sudden concentrated application of force or energy,” “to irradiate especially with microwaves.” 
Contents of the Article show

Absorb

Absorb is a transitive verb. The word “absorb” has two definitions. First, “to take in or soak up something by chemical or physical action. It implies “to take in and understand the information, idea or experience fully,” “take control of a smaller entity and make it a larger one,” or “take up and reduce the effect or intensity of a sound or an impact.” The second definition is “to take up the attention of someone or interest greatly.” For example, “It is important to have large trees because they absorb water during heavy rains.” The word “absorb” was used to imply that the trees take in water when raining. Another example, “At a young age, the parents notice that their kid has an interest in music, and it absorbs him completely.” The word “absorb” was used n the sentence to indicate that the kid has a big interest in music. 

Advance

Advance is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of advance are “to move forward purposefully” or “to make or cause making progress.” The word indicates “to accelerate or to make earlier, or to raise in rate or rank.” For example, “The girl advanced the payment for the rent.” The word “‘advance” was used in the sentence to describe that the girl paid the rent earlier than usual. Another example is, “The manager announced that one of the employees advanced due to excellent performance.” The word “advance was used to indicate that an employee was promoted or increased in rank. 

Advise

Advise is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of advise is “to give someone a recommendation, caution or inform.” The word’s usage indicates giving someone information or talking with someone and helping to decide on what to do. For example, “Every period, the professor advises the students on how to finish their degree on time successfully.” The word “advise” was used in the sentence to show that the professor frequently gives the students information and recommendation on finishing the degree on time every time they have a class.” Another example is, “The doctor strongly advises the patient to stop eating the foods that cause his discomfort.” The word “advise” was used in the sentence to imply that the doctor gave the patient information on what to do. 

Alter

Alter is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the word are “to change or cause in character or composition; make structural changes; or tailor a clothing for a better fit or to conform to fashion.” For example, “The father alter the plan regarding their vacation.” The word “alter” was used to imply that the plan for the vacation was changed according to the father. Another definition of the “alter” is a “castrate or spay, a domestic animal.” For example, “The pet owner alters his dog to stop producing.” The word “alter” was used in the sentence to indicate that the pet owner removed the sexual organ of his dog so that it is not able to produce puppies.

Amend

Amend is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of amend are “to change the words of a text, especially a law or a legal document,” “to reform oneself,” or “to modify for improvement by modification, deletion, or addition.” For example, “The homeowners amend the old rules and regulations of the village.” The word “amend” was used to indicate that the homeowners changed or improved the old rules in the village. Another example is, ”The students amend their thesis for final revision.” The word “amend” was used in the sentence to indicate that the student changed some of the information in their thesis as a last revision. 

Amplify

Amplify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of amplify are “to expand something, such as a statement, by the use of detail or illustration or by closer analysis” or “to increase amount, importance, or intensity.” For example, “The student council president as a student representative amplifies the voice and opinions of the students.” The word “amplify” was used to indicate that the student council president increased the importance of the voice and opinions of the students.” Another example is, “The speakers amplify their message to the incoming entrepreneurs.” The word “amplify” was used to show that the speakers expanded and increased importance on delivering their message to the incoming entrepreneurs. 

Attack

The word “attack” is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of attack are “to set upon or work against forcefully,” “to assail with unfriendly or bitter words,” “to start to affect or to act on injurious,” “to set to work on,” or “to begin to eat eagerly.” For example, “Armed attack the bank.” The word “attack” was used in the sentence to pertain to armed men forcefully going into the bank. Another example is “The hungry beggar attack on the meal given by the passerby.” The word “attack” indicates that the hungry beggar began eating the passerby’s meal.

Balloon

The strong verb “balloon” is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the balloon are “to swell, puff out, or expand,” “to ascend or travel in or as if in a balloon,” or “to increase or inflate rapidly.” For example, “The issue of the celebrity ballooned into a big controversy.” The word “balloon” was used in the sentence to indicate that the issue of the celebrity puffed out and quickly became a controversy. Another example is “The prices of the goods balloons three times compared to last year.” The word “balloon” was used in the sentence to mean a rapid increase in the prices of goods compared to last year. 

Bash

Bash is a transitive and intransitive verb. Bash is “to strike violently, such as hit or smash” or “to attack physically or verbally.” For example, “The man almost bash the table near him due to anger.” The word “bash” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man is angry and almost crashed the table near him. Another example is, “The victim ended the writers that bash her in their articles.” The word “bash” was used in the sentence to imply that the victim ended the writers that attacked her verbally by writing articles against her. 

Batter

The strong verb “batter” is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of batter are “to beat with successive blows to bruise, shatter, or demolish,” “bombard,” “to offensively touch or use force on a person without the person’s consent,” or “to strike something heavily and repeatedly.” For example, “Irresponsible and impulsive husband batters his wife every time they argue” The word “batter” was used in the sentence to indicate that the husband beats his wife every time they argue. Another example is, “The news reporters batter the criminal with questions.” The word “batter” was used in the sentence to indicate that the reporters bombarded the criminal with questions. Another definition for the batter is “to coat with a mixture, such as flour and egg, for frying.” For example, “After mixing the egg, cornstarch and flour, batter the chicken, then fry on a low heated pan.” The word “batter” was used in the sentence to mean to cover the chicken with the mixture, then fry it. 

Beam

Beam is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the beam are “to transmit data electronically, especially by satellite or wirelessly,” “to emit in beams or as a beam,” “to support with beams,” or “to direct to a particular audience.” For example, “The station beamed the news yesterday to the public that there is an incoming typhoon.” The word “beam” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that the news about the typhoon was broadcasted to the public.” Other definitions of the beam are “have a complexion with a strong bright color,” “experience happiness or an intense emotion,” express with a beaming face or smile,” or “to send out rays of light.” For example, “The sun beamed down the hallway.” The word “beam” was used in a past tense form, referring to the ray light of the sun being down on the hallway. Another example is, “The dancers beam as they enter the stage.” The word “beam” was used in the sentence to indicate that the dancers smile as they enter the stage. 

Beef

Beef is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of beef is “to increase or add substance, strength, or power.” It is commonly used as a verb phrase “beef up.” For example, “As the fire becomes tremendous, the firefighters were beefed up with volunteers.” The word “beef” was used as “beefed up” to indicate that volunteers have increased to fight the fire. Another definition of beef is “complaining or grumbling a lot about something or someone.” For example, “The old employee always beef about the new one because of the repeated mistakes” The word “beef” was used in the sentence to indicate that the old employee was always complaining about the repeated mistakes of the new employee. 

Blab

Blab is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of blab are “to talk idly or thoughtlessly” or “to reveal a secret, especially without reserve or discretion.” For example, “The two girls blab about each other when they fight.” The word “blab” was used in the sentence to indicate that the two girls reveal each other’s secret when they fight. Another example is, “The man blabs endlessly to the stranger he just met.” The word “blab” was used in the sentence to show that the man was carelessly and endlessly talking to the stranger he had just met. 

Blast

Blast is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the blast are “to use an explosive or shoot,” “to proceed rapidly or aggressively,” “to make a vigorous attack,” or “to play loudly or blare.” For example, “The soldiers died after the terrorist blast towards their place.” The word “blast” was used in the sentence to indicate that the terrorist used an explosive that led to the death of the soldiers. Another example is, “The DJ blast the music to hype the crowd in the crowd.” The word “blast” in the sentence was used to imply that loud music hyped the crowd in the club.

Bolt

Bolt is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of bolt as an intransitive verb are “to move suddenly, nervously, or start,” “to move or proceed quickly, dash,” “to break away from or oppose one’s precious affiliation,” or “to produce seed prematurely.” For example, “The resident bolted as they heard the fire alarm rang.” The word “bolt” was used in a past tense form to indicate that residents quickly dash after they heard the fire alarm rang. Meanwhile, the definitions of the bolt as a transitive verb are “to secure with a bolt,” “to attach or fasten with bolts,” “to eat hastily or without chewing,” “to break away from or refuse to support,” or “to say impulsively or blurt.” For example, “Bolt the door and all the windows before leaving to make sure that the house is secured.” The word “bolt” was used in the sentence to indicate that it is essential to close or secure the door and windows before leaving the house. 

Boost

Boost is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of boost are “to push or shove up from below,” to increase or raise,” “to promote the cause or interest,” or “steal or shoplift.” For example, “The management boost the discount for the next months. ” The word “boost” was used to indicate that the management increased and raised the discount for the following months. Another example, “The kid was boosted into the high chair by her mother to indicate that they are about to eat lunch.” The word “boost” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that the mother put her kid into the high chair because they are about to eat lunch. 

Brief

Brief is a transitive verb. The definitions of the brief are “to make an abstract or abridgment of,” “to give final precise instructions to,” “to coach thoroughly,” “to provide important information to,” or “to provide a lawyer the facts of a legal case to take them to court.” For example, “The university dean briefed the new students about the rules and regulations.” The word “brief” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the dean discussed the rules and regulations of the university. Another example is, “The complainant briefed the lawyer about the assault incident yesterday.” The word “brief” was used in a past tense form in the sentence to imply that the complainant gave the lawyer the information about the assault incident that happened yesterday.

Broadcast

Broadcast is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of broadcast are “to disperse or distribute seed or something similar over a broad area,” “to make widely known,” “to convey or relay using radio, television, or internet,” or “to speak or perform on a broadcast program.” For example, “Every month, the farmers broadcast fertilizer to make the crops healthy.” The word “broadcast” in the sentence indicates that the farmers distribute fertilizers every month to make the crop healthy. Another example is, “The famous singer broadcasted that she will release a new song and album within the year.” The word “broadcast” was in the past tense form and used to mean that the singer informed the public that an upcoming song and album would be released within the year. 

Brood

Brood is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of brood are “to sit on or to incubate eggs,” “to produce by or as if incubation or hatch,” “to think anxiously or grimly about,” or “to sit silently and seriously or meditate.” For example, “The teenager girl brooded in her room all day after she and her mother fight.” The word “brood” was used in the sentence in the form of past tense to imply that the after the girl and the mother fought, the girl dwells gloomily in the room all day. Another example is, “The caretaker witnessed the chicken brooding when he was about to feed them.” The word “brood” was used in the sentence in the present continuous tense to imply that the chicken is incubating the eggs when the caretaker is about to feed them. 

Burst

Burst is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of burst are “to break open, apart, or into pieces, commonly from impact or from pressure from within,” “to provide a way from an excess of emotion,” “to come out or spring suddenly,” or “launch or drop.” For example, “The tears burst in her eyes when the group of people makes fun of her.” The word “burst” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl felt embarrassed that made her cry when a group of people made fun of her.” Another example is, “The operation is needed because the doctors found out the patient’s appendix already burst.” The word “burst” was used in the sentence to indicate that the patient’s appendix broke from within and surgery is needed.

Bus

Bus is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the bus are “to travel by a large motor vehicle intended to transport passengers, commonly along a fixed route according to a schedule,” “to transport by bus,” or to remove dirty dishes from.” For example, “The student bus for 2 hours to attend the 7 AM class.” The word “bus” was used in the sentence to indicate that the student needs to ride a large motor vehicle for 2 hours to attend the 7 AM class. Another example is, “The waiter bus the table after every customer leaves.” The word “bus” was used to indicate that the waiter removes the dishes from the table after every customer leaves.

Bust

Bust is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of bust as a transitive verb are “to break or wreck with force,” “break up,” “to ruin financially, or exhaust,” “to give a hard time,” “demote,” “arrest or raid,” “hit or slug,” or “to execute or perform.” For example, “The authority bust the hideout of the most wanted drug dealers in the city.” The word “bust” was used in the sentence to indicate that the authority raided the hideout and arrested the drug dealers. Another example is, “The angry crowd in the rally busted the monument of the President as a sign that they are not in favor of making abortion legal.” The word “bust” was used in the sentence to indicate that the crowd wrecks the president’s monument because they do not favor the legalization of abortion.

Capture

Capture is a transitive verb. The definitions of capture are “to take or gain control by force,” “to emphasize, represent, or preserve, in a more or less permanent form,” or “to fascinate and hold the interest of.” For example, “20 suspects involved in human trafficking were captured during the operation.” The word “capture” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that 20 suspects were taken by force during the operation, as they are involved in human trafficking. Another example is, “The singer captured the heart and feelings of the audience as she sings effortlessly and amazingly.” The word “capture” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that the audience was fascinated by the singer’s performance. 

Catch

Catch is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of catch are “to capture or take especially after chase,” “to find unexpectedly,” “to take or to knot in or as if in a trap,” “to take hold of or seize,” “to grasp hastily or try to grasp,” “to take in or retain,” “to get aboard in time,” “to become affected,” or “to see or watch.” For example, “The waitress catches the last bus trip even though she worked overtime.” The word “catch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the waitress got aboard the bus even though she worked overtime. Another example is, “The runners catch their breath as they pass the finish line.” The word “catch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the runners took in or retained their breath as they passed the finish line. 

Charge

Charge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of charge are “to ask for payment or to ask payment to a person,” “to give an electric charge to,” “to load or fill,” or “to attack or to bring a weapon into position.” For example, “Charge all the electronic devices because there will be a possible rotational brownout.” The word “charge” was used in the sentence to indicate that to give an electric charge to all electronic devices because there would be a possible rotational brownout. Other definitions of charge are “to record an item as an expense debt, obligation or liability,” “to impose a financial burden on,” “to place the guilt or blame,” “to impose a task or responsibility on,” or “to command, instruct, or exhort with authority.” For example, “The president of the class charges the vice president with the task of designing the whole stage for the program.” The word “charge” was used in the sentence to indicate that the president imposed a task or responsibility on the vice president, designing the program’s stage. 

Chap

Chap is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of chap are “to open in cracks, slits, or chinks” or “to cause to chap.” For example, “Is it normal that lips chap when the weather is dry?” The word “chap” was used in the sentence to ask if cracking of lips is normal during dry weather. Another example is, “The ground chapped due to the intense heat of the sun.” The word “chap” was used in the sentence to imply that the ground cracked due to the sun’s intense heat.

Chip

Chip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of chip are “to cut or hew with an edged tool,” “to cut into chips, or break a small piece or fragment from something,” to hit with backspin, usually a return in tennis,” or “to play a chip shot.” For example, “The bone in the athlete’s arm chipped when he fell.” The word “chip” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that the athlete broke his bone in the arm because he fell. Another example is, “The car paint chipped off due to unpredictable change in the weather.” The word “chip” was used in the sentence to indicate that the paint on the car broke into small pieces because of the unpredicted change in the weather. 

Clasp

Clasp is a transitive verb. The definitions of clasp are “to secure with or as if with a clasp,” “to enclose and hold with the arms or cuddle,” and “to seize with or as if with the hand or grasp.” For example, “The mother clasped her newborn in her arms because she is happy.” The word “clasp” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that the mother holds the newborn with her arms because of happiness. Another example is “The girl clasps her wallet and mobile phone as she feels someone is following her.” The word “clasp” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl grasped the wallet and mobile phone. 

Climb

Climb is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the climb are “to go upward with gradual or continuous progress,” “to ascend or lift oneself, especially by grasping or clutching with the hands,” “to go about or down commonly by seizing or holding with hands,” or “to get into or out of clothing commonly with some haste or effort.” For example, “The tourists climb the mountain early in the morning.” The word “climb” was used in the sentence to imply that the tourists started to go upward the mountain early in the morning. Another example is, “The guide helped the hikers when they climb down the hill because it is dark.” The word “climb” was used in the sentence to indicate that the guide helped when the hikers went down the hill.

Clutch

Clutch is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the clutch are “to grasp or hold with or as if with the hand or claws commonly strongly, tightly, or suddenly” or “to operate an automobile clutch.” For example, “Clutch at the opportunity when it comes around.” The word “clutch” was used in the sentence to imply that when the opportunity comes, grasp it. Another example is, “The frightened woman clutched her bag when she felt the man was following her.” The word “clutch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the woman tightly held the bag.

Collide

Collide is an intransitive verb. The definitions of collide are “to come together with solid or direct impact” and “used of situations in which people or groups disagree or are very different from each other or clash.” For example, “The two candidates collide in the debate.” The word “collide” was used in the sentence to indicate that the two candidates clashed or disagreed with each other in the debate. Another example is, “A truck and two cars collided in the intersection and caused heavy traffic.” The word “collide” was used in the sentence in the past tense form to imply that a truck and two cars crashed together, and it was the cause of heavy traffic. 

Command

Command is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of command are “to direct authoritatively or order,” “to exercise a dominating influence over,” or “to order or request to be given.” For example, “The coach commanded the trainees to wait for his instruction.” The word “command” was used in the sentence to indicate that trainees need to wait for the order of the coach.” Another example is, “The veteran artist commands a high talent fee.” The word “command” was used in the sentence to imply that the veteran artist requested a high talent fee.

Commune

Commune is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the commune are “to receive Holy Communion, “to communicate intimately, especially on a spiritual level,” or “talk over or discuss.” For example, “Commune with God through praying to relieve and lessen the worries in life.” The word “commune” was used in the sentence to imply that to communicate intimately with God through praying to relieve and lessen the worries in life. Another example is, “The man commune and catch up about life with his friend.” The word “commune” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man usually goes to a friend to talk about life. 

Cower

Cower is an intransitive verb. The definition of cower is “to lower the head or body or curl up in fear, often while moving backward.” For example, “The girl cowers whenever she imagines that there is a monster under the bed.” The word “cower” was used in the sentence to indicate that the girl curls up in fear, imagining that there is a monster under the bed. Another example is, “The cat cowered after seeing a big dog.” The word “cower” was used in the sentence to imply the cat curled up after seeing a big dog. 

Crackle

Crackle is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crackle are “to make small sharp, sudden, repeated noises,” “to form a network of fine cracks on the surface,” or “to show animation or sparkle.” For example, “The television unexpectedly crackle a static sound.” The word “crackle” was used in the sentence to imply that the television make static sounds repeatedly. Another example is, “Crackle up the flames by putting the coil into the fire.” The word “crackle” was used in the sentence to imply to sparkle the flames by putting the coil into the fire.

Crash

Crash is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crash are “to break violently and noisily or smash,” “to damage in landing,” “to go to bed or fall asleep,” “to enter or attend without invitation or without paying,” “to move toward aggressively,” or “to cause to crash, such as in a computer system or program.” For example, “A huge expense is expected by the owner after the car crash.” The word “crash” was used in the sentence to imply that the car was broken or smashed, and the owner expects a huge expense. Another example is, “The party is over, and the birthday celebrant crash on the sofa due to tiredness.” The word “crash” was used in the sentence to imply that the birthday celebrant slept on the sofa because of tiredness. 

Crave

Crave is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crave are “to ask for earnestly: beg or demand,” “to want greatly or need,” “to yearn for,” or “to have a string or inward desire.” For example, “They didn’t know that the reason why the kids are excessively hard-headed is that they crave attention.” The word “crave” was used in the sentence to imply that the kids are hard-headed because they want and need attention. Another example is, “Suddenly; the pregnant woman craves a watermelon.” The word “crave” was used in the sentence to indicate that the pregnant woman demands and yearns for a watermelon. 

Crush

Crush is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of crush are “to squeeze or force by pressure to alter or destroy the structure,” “to reduce to particles by pounding or grinding,” “to subdue completely,” “to cause overwhelming emotional pain to someone,” “to experience an intense and passing infatuation on someone,” or “hug or embrace.” For example, “The workers crush huge rocks using a special machine.” The word “crush” was used in the sentence to imply that there is a particular machine that the workers utilize to destroy huge rocks. Another example is, “The man crushed his clothes inside the luggage.” The word “crush” was used in a past tense form in the sentence to imply the man squeezing his clothes inside the luggage.

Dangle

Dangle is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of dangle are “to hang loosely and commonly to be able to sway freely,” “to be a hanger-on or a dependent,” and “to occur in a sentence without having a normally expected syntactic relation to the rest of the sentence.” For example, “The ornaments dangle on the model’s ears, and it suits her.” The word “dangle” was used in the sentence to imply that the ornaments in the model’s ears swing freely. Another example is, “The clever cat dangle on the ceiling with a desire to catch the mouse.” The word “dangle” was used in the sentence to indicate that the cat hangs loosely on the ceiling.”

Dash

Dash is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of dash are “to move with sudden speed,” “to break by striking or knocking,” “smash, ruin, or destroy,” “to make ashamed, or “depress or sadden,” “to complete, execute, or finish off hastily,” or “to affect by mixing in something different.” For example, “The teacher dashed out the door when she realized that she forgot something in the faculty room.” The word “dash” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to imply that the teacher moved at sudden speed to get something in the faculty room. Another example is, “The irate customer dashed the table when she got the wrong order.” The word “dash” was used in the sentence to indicate that the customer destroyed the table.

Demolish

Demolish is a transitive verb. The definitions of demolish are “to break to pieces, such as smash, tear down, or raze,” “to do away with or destroy,” or “to strip of any pretense of merit or credence.” For example, “The new university president demolish the old building.” The word “demolish” was used in the sentence to imply that the new president had torn down the old building in the university. Another example is, “The decision maker of the team demolished the main plan and changed it.” The word “demolished” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the decision-maker of the team destroyed the primary plan and changed it.

Depart

Depart is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of depart are “to leave or go away,” “die,” or “to turn aside or deviate.” For example, “The plane departed from the airport at exactly 8 a.m.” The word “depart” was used in the sentence in the past tense to imply that the plane left the airport at exactly 8 a.m. Another example is, “The beloved and favorite dog of the old woman departed due to parvovirus.” The word “depart” was used in the sentence to indicate that the dog died due to parvovirus. 

Deposit

Deposit is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of deposit are “to place or to safe keep,” “to put in a bank,” “to lay down,” or “to let fall, such as sediment.” For example, “The mother deposits all her money for future purposes.” The word “deposit” was used in the sentence to indicate that the mother put all the money in the bank for future purposes. Another example is, “The luggage was deposited in the compartment of the car.” The word “deposit” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to imply that the luggage was placed or kept in the compartment of the car. 

Detect

Detect is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of detect are “to discover the true character of,” “to discover or determine the existence, presence, or the fact of,” “demodulate,” or “to work as a detective.” For example, “The man detects the slightest changes in her mood.” The word “detect” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man determines the changes in the girl’s mood. Another example is, “The job of the policemen is to obstruct and detect wrongdoings.” The word “detect” was used in the sentence to imply that the policemen’s work is to prevent and to work as a detective related to wrongdoings. 

Deviate

Deviate is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of deviate are “to stray from a standard, principle, or topic,” “to depart from an established course or norm,” and “to cause to turn out of a previous course.” For example, “The vehicles deviate because of the traffic.” The word “deviate” was used in the sentence to mean that the vehicles need to turn because of the traffic.” Another example is, “The woman deviated her course from architecture to filmmaking.” The word “deviate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the woman departed from the course of architecture to filmmaking.

Devour

Devour is a transitive verb. The definitions of devour are “to eat up hungrily,” “to use up or destroy as if by eating,” “to prey upon,” or “read something rapidly and eagerly.” For example, “The beggar devoured the food that was bought and given by volunteers for those affected by the typhoon.” The word “devour” was used in the sentence to imply that the beggar ate up hungrily the food given by the volunteers. Another example is, “A 7-year-old boy went to the library and devoured all the science fiction books.” The word “devour” was used in the sentence to indicate that the 7-year-old boy read all the science fiction books in the library rapidly and eagerly.

Direct

Direct is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of direct are “to cause to turn, move, or point exactly or to follow a straight course,” “to point, extend, or project in a specified line or course,” and “to regulate the activities or course of,” to carry out the organizing, energizing, and supervising of,” or “to train or lead performances.” For example, “Is there a direct way to the municipality from the train station?” The word “direct” was used in the sentence to indicate that the question is looking for the exact point to follow to get to the municipality from the train station. Another example is, “The actor was shocked when he discovered that the one who will direct his movie was his high school classmate” The word “direct” was used in the sentence to indicate that the actor’s high school classmate is the one that is going to lead the performances in the movie. Another definitions of the word “direct” are “to impart orally,” “to adapt in expression to have particular applicability,” “to write a letter to a person,” “to show or point out the way,” or “to request or enjoin with authority.” For example, “The guard directed the way going to the entrance of the concert.” The word “direct” was used in the sentence to imply that the guard showed or pointed out the way to the entrance. 

Discern

Discern is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of discern are “to detect with the eyes,” “to detect with senses other than vision,” “to recognize or identify as separate and distinct or discriminate,” “to come to know or recognize mentally,” and “to see or understand the difference.” For example, “The mother’s instinct always discerns the emotion of his daughter.” The word “discern” was used in the sentence to imply that the mother knows or recognizes the daughter’s emotions. Another example is, “The chef discerns the taste of the food without tasting it.” The word “discern” was used in the sentence to indicate that the chef is able to detect the taste of the food without tasting it.

Discover

Discover is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of discover are “to make known, visible, or exposed,” “display,” or to obtain sight or knowledge of for the first time or find,” “to make a discovery,” or “to find out.” For example, “Isaac Newton discovered and formulated the gravitational theory or the law of gravity.” The word “discover” was used in the sentence to imply that Isaac Newton was the first to find or have knowledge about the law of gravity. Another example is, “The detective discovered the cause behind the death of the judge.” The word “discover” was used in the sentence to indicate that the detective found the cause behind the judge’s death. 

Dismantle

Dismantle is a transitive verb. The definitions of dismantle are “to disconnect the pieces,” “to destroy the integrity or functioning,” “to strip of dress or to cover or divest,” or “to strip of furniture and equipment.” For example, “The repair shop dismantled the car because many parts are not functioning.” The word “dismantle” was used in the sentence in a past tense form to indicate that the repair shop stripped or destroyed the car due to many parts not working. Another example is, “The union dismantle the present administration to stop their wrongdoings.” The word “dismantle” was used in the sentence to imply that the union destroyed the functioning of the present administration.

Download

Download is a transitive verb. The definition of the download is “to transfer such as data, files, etc., from one location to another, such as from computer to mobile phone.” For example, “The students download and print the handouts. ” The word was “download” used in the sentence to indicate that the students transfer the file from the internet to their device and print them. Another example is, “Many applications are downloaded from Google Play Store.” The word “download” was used in the sentence to indicate that there are many applications installed on the device from Google Play Store. 

Drag

Drag is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of drag as a transitive verb are “to draw or pull slowly or heavily or haul,” “to bring by or as if by force or compulsion,” “protract,” “to pass a drag over,” “to hit while moving toward first base,” or “to select and move by using a mouse, a touch screen, etc.” For example, “Click and drag the file to move it to another folder.” The word “drag” was used in the sentence to select and move the file by using a mouse or touching the screen to another folder. Another example is, “The injured athlete dragged himself to the clinic.” The word “drag” was used in the past tense form in the sentence to imply that the injured athlete moved with slowness or difficulty in getting to the clinic. Other definitions of the “drag” as an intransitive verb are “to hang or lag behind,” “to fish or search with a drag,” “to trail along on the ground,” “to move slowly because of fatigue,” “to make a plucking or pulling movement,” or “to participate in a drag race.” For example, “The heavy sack of vegetables was dragged from the truck to the market.” The word “drag” was used in the sentence to imply that the sack of vegetables was trailed along on the ground from the truck to the market. 

Drain

Drain is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of drain are “to draw off gradually or completely,” “to cause the gradual disappearance,” “to exhaust physically or emotionally,” “to empty by drinking the contents,” or “to deplete or empty by or as if by drawing off by degrees or in increments.” For example, “Wash the fruits and vegetables and drain the water before storing them in the refrigerator.” The word “drain” was used in the sentence to indicate waiting for the water to disappear before storing it in the refrigerator. Another example is, “The director of the movie was drained due to continuous changes in the location.” The word “drain” was used in the sentence to imply that the director was exhausted due to the continuously changing location.

Drip

Drip is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of drip are “to let fall in drops,” “to let out or seem to spill copiously,” “to waft or pass gently,” or “to overflow with or as if with moisture.” For example, “The girl’s tears drip from her eyes as she said goodbye to her mother.” The word “drip” was used in the sentence to imply that the tears fell from the girl’s eyes. Another example is, “The water is dripping on the ground from the car.” The word “drip” was used in the sentence to imply that the water drops on the ground from the car.

Drop

Drop is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of drop are “to fall in drops,” “to fall unexpectedly or suddenly or in the form of collapse or death,” “to descend from one line or level to another,” and “to enter or pass as if without conscious effort of will into some state, condition, or activity,” “to cease to be of concern,” “to disappear or dismiss,” or “to be released to the public.” For example, “The driver drops off the passenger at the nearest hospital.” The word “drop” was used in the sentence to imply that the driver descended the passenger to the nearest hospital. Another example is, “The court drop the case of the powerful politician.” The word “drop” was used in the sentence to imply that the court dismissed the case of the powerful politician.

Eavesdrop

Eavesdrop is an intransitive verb. The definition of eavesdrop is “to furtively listen to what is said in private or to a conversation without them knowing.” For example, “It is not appropriate to eavesdrop on other’s conversation.” The word “eavesdrop” was used in the sentence to imply that listening to others’ conversations secretly is inappropriate. Another example is, “The two old employees eavesdropped when the director asked for the presence and needed to talk to the new employee.” The word “eavesdrop” was used in the past tense to indicate that the two old employees listened to the conversion of the director and the new employee. 

Engage

Engage is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of engage are “to propose as backing to a cause or aim,” “expose to hazard for the attainment or support of some end,” “to entangle or entrap in or as if in a snare or bog,” “to bind by a pledge to marry,” “to provide occupation or involve,” “to arrange to obtain the use or services or to hire,” “‘to hold attention or to engross,” or “to do or take part in something.” For example, “The teachers engage the students to study.” The word “engage” was used in the sentence to imply that the teacher holds the student’s attention to study. Another example is, “The man was engaged in wrongdoings.” The word “engage” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man was entangled or involved in the wrongdoings.

Engulf

Engulf is a transitive verb. The definitions of engulf are “to flow over and enclose or overwhelm” or “to take in by or as if by flowing over or enclosing.” For example, “The whole family was engulfed by a feeling of depressed when their grandmother said her last words.” The word “engulf” was used in the sentence to indicate that the whole family was overwhelmed by depression when their grandmother said the last words. Another example is, “It is the last term of the school year, and the students engulfed themselves in their projects.” The word “engulf” was used in the sentence to indicate that the students were overwhelmed by the projects.

Enlarge

Enlarge is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of enlarge are “to make large or extend,” “to give greater scope or expand,” “to set free,” “to grow larger,” or “to speak or write at length or elaborate.” For example, “Reading books or any knowledgeable publications enlarge one’s vocabulary.” The word “enlarge” was used in the sentence to imply that reading expands one’s vocabulary. Another example is, “The thyroid glands enlarge, and it is known as goiter.” The word “enlarge” was used in the sentence to indicate that the thyroid glands expand or grow larger, and it is known as goiter.

Ensnare

Ensnare is a transitive verb. The definitions of ensnare are “to take in or as if in a snare,” “to catch or get control of something or someone,” or “to catch in as in a trap.” For example, “The fishes in the sea got ensnared in the fishing net.” The word “ensnare” was used in a past tense form in the sentence to indicate that the fish in the sea got trapped or caught in the fishing net. Another example is, “She’s afraid that a man will blackmail and ensnare her.” The word “ensnare” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl is afraid to get controlled by the man. 

Envelop

Envelop is a transitive verb. The definitions of envelop are “to enclose or enfold totally with or as if with a covering” or “to surround or partially surround.” For example, “The house was already enveloped with smoke when the firefighters arrived.” The word “envelop” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the house was covered with smoke when the firefighters arrived. Another example is, “The police envelop the area where the hostage take and hostage is located.” The word “envelop” was used in the sentence to indicate that the policemen surrounded the area where the hostage taker and the hostage were located.

Erase

Erase is a transitive or an intransitive verb. The definitions of erase are “to rub or scrape out,” “to remove written or drawn marks,” “to remove recorded matter from a magnetic medium, such as magnetic tape,” “ to delete from computer storage,” and “to remove from existence or memory.” For example, “The proctor erased the name of the absent girl on the list.” The word “erase” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the proctor removed the name of the absent girl. Another example is “Erase all the bad memories.” The word “erase” was used in the sentence to indicate removing all the bad memories from memory. 

Escort

Escort is a transitive verb. The definition of escort is “to accompany someone or something to somewhere as an escort, especially for protection or security, or as a mark of rank.” For example, “The guards escorted the President every time he is outside.” The word “escort” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the guards accompany to protect every time the President is outside. Another example is, “The girl asked her father to escort her to the party.” The word “escort” was used in the sentence to indicate that the father was asked to accompany the girl to the party.

Expand

Expand is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of expand are “to open up, unfold, or spread,” “to enhance the extent, number, volume, scope or broaden,” “to express at length or in greater detail,” and “to write out in full or to subject to mathematical expansion,” or “to feel generous or optimistic.” For example, “The restaurant is planning to expand its menu.” The word “expand” was used in the sentence to indicate that the restaurant plans to increase the number of menus. Another example is, “The house owner wants to expand their garage because they are planning to buy a new car.” The word “expand” was used in the sentence to indicate that the house owner wants to increase the size of their garage because they are planning to buy a new car. 

Explode

Explode is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of explode are “to burst or shatter with sudden violence or noise as a result of rapid combustion, decomposition, excessive internal pressure, or other processes, typically scattering fragments widely,” “to give forth a sudden strong and noisy outburst of emotion,” “increase suddenly or rapidly in size, number, or extent,” or “show a belief or theory to be safe or unfounded.” For example, “The bomb from the terrorist exploded that caused many casualties.” The word “explode” was in past tense form and was used in the sentence to imply that the bomb burst with a lot of force and a loud noise that caused many casualties. Another example is, “The number of tourists exploded during summer.” The word “explode” was used in the sentence to mean that the number of tourists during summer increased.

Explore

Explore is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of explore are “to investigate, study, or analyze or to look into,” “to become familiar with by testing or experimenting,” “to travel over for adventure or discovery,” “to examine especially for diagnostic purposes,” or “to make or conduct a systematic search.” For example, “Explore the world because it results in different experiences and lessons.” The word “explore” was used in the sentence to imply that traveling and discovering the world gives experiences and lessons. Another example, “Caribbean was first explored by the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus in1492.” The word “explore” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that Columbus first traveled and examined the Caribbean. 

Expose

Expose is a transitive verb. The definitions of expose are “to deprive of shelter, protection, or care: subject to risk from harmful action or condition,” “to submit or make accessible to a particular action or influence,” and “to abandon, especially by leaving in the open,” “to make known or bring to light,” “to disclose the faults or crimes,” or “to cause to be visible or open to view or display.” For example, “The corrupt officials are afraid that someone exposes their dishonesty.” The word “expose” was used in the sentence to imply that corrupt officials are afraid that someone is going to disclose their dishonesty. Another example is, “Kids are exposed to gadgets instead of recreational activities.” The word “expose” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate the kids were introduced to gadgets instead of recreational activities.

Extend

Extend is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of “extend” are “to spread, stretch forth or unbend,” “to stretch out to the maximum length,” “to take possession by a writ of extent,” “to make the offer or proffer,” “to cause to reach,” “to cause to be longer or prolong,” ‘advance or further,” ”to cause to be of greater area or volume or enlarge,” to increase the scope, meaning, or application or broaden,” or “to stretch out in the distance, space, or time or reach.” For example, “The tourists extend their stay in Korea.” The word “extend” was used in the sentence to indicate that the tourists prolonged their stay in Korea. Another example is, “The coworkers extend their condolences to the family of their deceased colleague.” The word “extend” was used in the sentence to imply that the coworkers reached the family of their deceased colleague and said their condolences. 

Extract

Extract is a transitive verb. The definitions of extract are “to draw forth,” “to pull or take out forcibly,” “to obtain by much effort from someone unwilling,” “to withdraw by a physical or chemical process,” “to separate from an ore,” “to determine by calculation,” or “to select and copy out or cite.” For example, “The investigator extract information about the death of the Governor.” The word “extract” was used in the sentence to indicate that the investigator obtain information about the death of the Governor. Another example is, “The students extract their DNA at home.” The word “extract” was used in the sentence to imply that the students take out or obtain their DNA. 

Eyeball

Eyeball is a transitive verb. The definition of eyeball is “to look at intently, especially when evaluating or choosing.” For example, “The man eyeballed the stranger as he recognized him as the one that scammed him a few weeks ago.” The word “eyeball” was used in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the man looked closely and check if the stranger was the scammer a few weeks ago. Another example is, “The mother told her daughter to eyeball her decisions in life.” The word “eyeball” was used in the sentence to indicate that the mother wants the daughter to look closely at her life decisions.

Fight

Fight is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of fight are “to contend in battle or physical combat,” “wage or combat,” “to struggle to endure or surmount,” “to resolve by struggle,” “to put forth a determined effort,” “to manage in battle or storm,” or “to oppose or to attempt to prevent.” For example, “Fight for what is right.” The word “fight” was used in the sentence to imply putting forth a determined effort for what is right. Another example is, “The sick soldier fight all the battles for his life.” The word “fight” was used in the sentence to indicate that the soldier endured or overcame the battles. 

Fish

Fish is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of fish are “to attempt to catch a fish,” “to seek something by the roundabout,” “to search for something underwater,” “to engage in a search by groping or feeling,” or “to pull or draw as if fishing.” For example, “The careless man always fish for his car key.” The word “fish” was used in the sentence to imply that the careless man constantly searches for the car keys. Another example is, “The family fish for salmon every week on the river. The word “fish” was used in the sentence to indicate that the family goes to the river every week to catch salmon. 

Fling

Fling is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of fling are “to move in a brusque or headlong manner,” “to kick or plunge vigorously,” “to throw forcefully, impetuously, or casually,” “to cast as if by throwing,” “to place or send suddenly and unceremoniously,” or “to give unrestrained.” For example, “The kid flings the toys on the floor because he is angry.” The word “fling” was used in the sentence to imply that the kid is angry and throws the toys on the floor. Another example is “The college student flung herself into mass communication.” The word “fling” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the college student was into mass communication. 

Fly

Fly is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of fly are “to move in or pass through the air with wings,” “to move through the air or before the wind or through outer space,” “to take a flight,” “to fade and disappear or vanish,” “to move, pass, or spread quickly,” “to be moved with sudden extreme emotion,” “to float, wave, or soar in the air,” “to become expended or dissipated rapidly,” or “to flee or escape from.” For example, “The airplane fly late in the evening.” The word “fly” was used in the sentences to mean that the airplane move through the air late in the evening. Another example is “Time flies so fast.” The word “fly” was in a third-person singular form, “flies,” and used in the sentence to indicate that time move or pass quickly. 

Frown

Frown is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of frown are “to contract the brow in displeasure or concentration” or “to give evidence of displeasure or disapproval by or as if by facial expression.” For example, “She frowns while listening to the speech of the corrupt official.” The word “frown” was used in the sentence to indicate that the girl gave a facial expression of displeasure while listening to the speech of the corrupt official. Another example is, “The doctor frowned when she learned that the patient is not drinking the prescribed medicine.” The word “frown” was in a past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the doctor showed displeasure when she learned that the patient was not drinking the medicine. 

Fuse

Fuse is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of fuse are “to decrease to a liquid or plastic state by heat,” “to blend thoroughly by or by melting together or combine,” or “to stitch by applying heat and pressure with or without the use of an adhesive.” For example, “The white, green and yellow paint were fused to turn it to another color.” The word “fuse” was used in the sentence to indicate that the white, green, and yellow paint were combined and turned into another color. Another example is, “They fuse all the ingredients in the mixing bowl.” The word “fuse” was used in the sentence to indicate that all the ingredients were blended in a mixing bowl.

Garble

Garble is a transitive verb. The definitions of garble are “to modify or distort as to make an incorrect impression or shift the meaning,” “to introduce textual error into a message by inaccurate encipherment, transmission, or decipherment,” or “to sift impurities.” For example, “The information was garbled when they disseminated the message to the residents.” The word “garble” was used in the sentence to indicate the information was distorted when they were disseminated to message to the residents. Another example is, “The teachers garble the instructions in the exam, unintentionally.” The word “garble” was used in the sentence to indicate that the teachers didn’t mean to jumble the instructions in the exam.

Gaze

Gaze is an intransitive verb. The definition of gaze is “to fix the eyes in a steady intent look, often with eagerness or studious attention.” For example, “The kid gazes at the department store’s toys.” The word “gaze” was used in the sentence to imply that the kid eagerly looked at the toys in the department store. Another example is, “The couple gazed at each other’s after they said their vows.” The word “gaze” was in a past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the couple intently looked at each other after they said their vows. 

Glare

Glare is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of glare are “to shine with a harsh uncomfortably brilliant light,” “stand out or obtrude,” “to stare angrily or fiercely,” or “to cause to be sharply reflected.” For example, “The professor glared at the students that were not listening during the discussion.” The word “glare” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the professor angrily stared at the students that were not listening during the discussion. Another example is, “The debutant glare with elegance as she walks down to the stage.” The word “glare” was used in the sentence to imply that the debutant stands out with elegance.

Gleam

Gleam is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of gleam are “to shine with or as if with subdued steady light or moderate brightness,” “to appear briefly or faintly,” or “to cause to gleam.” For example, “The eyes of the man gleamed when he received his first salary.” The word “gleam” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the man’s eyes brightened when the man received the first salary. Another example is, “The bulb outside the house gleam, and it is the only light source in the house.” The word “gleam” was used in the sentence to imply that the bulb outside the house is bright.

Glisten

Glisten is an intransitive verb. The definitions of glisten are “to give off a sparkling or lustrous reflection,” “to gleam by reflecting light,” and “shine, glitter, or gloss.” For example, “The grasses in the garden glisten with dew.” The word “glisten” was used in the sentence to imply that the grasses in the garden shine with dew. Another example is, “The jewelry of the candidate glistens like gold and complements her outfit.” The word “glisten” was used in the sentence to imply that the jewelry sparkles similar to the gold and complements the girl’s outfit.

Glitter

Glitter is an intransitive verb. The definitions of glitter are “to shine by reflection with many small flashes of brilliant light or sparkle,” “to shine with strong emotion or flash,” “to be superficially attractive or exciting,” or “to be brilliantly attractive, luxurious, or magnificent.” For example, “The huge Christmas tree beside the mall glitter with lights.” The word “glitter” was used in the sentence to imply that the Christmas tree beside the mall shine or flashes brilliant lights. Another example is, “The eyes of the workers glittered with joy when the manager announced that they reached the quota.” The word “glitter” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the eyes of the workers express emotion, which is joy, as the manager announced that they reached the quota. 

Gobble

Gobble is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of gobble are “to swallow or eat greedily,” “to take eagerly or grab,” “to read rapidly or greedily,” “to make the natural guttural noise of a male turkey,” or “to make a sound resembling the gobble of a turkey.” For example, “The impressions of the people to the government officials are they only gobble the money once they are in the position.” The word “gobble” was used in the sentence to indicate that the impression to the government officials is they only take or grab the people’s money. Another example is, “The beggar gobbled all the food the restaurant staff gave.” The word “gobble” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the beggar eats the food greedily, the food given by the staff of the restaurant.

Govern

Govern is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of govern are “to exercise constant authority over,” “to rule and direct the making and administration of policy,” “to control the speed of a machine, especially by automatic,” and “to control, direct, or strongly influence the actions and conduct,” “to hold in check or restrain,” or “to exercise authority.” For example, “The smartest student govern the whole batch for the rest of the school year.” The word “govern” was used in the sentence to indicate that the smartest in the class direct or control the whole batch for the rest of the school year. Another example is, “The man govern his feelings because he is afraid to get hurt.” The word “govern” was used in the sentence to imply that the man held back his feelings. 

Grasp

Grasp is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of grasp are “to make the motion of seizing or clutch,” “to take or seize eagerly,” “to clasp or embrace especially with the fingers or arms,” or “to lay hold of with the mind or comprehend.” For example, “Climbers need to wear proper gears and grasp carefully on the rocks as they climb up the mountain.” The word “grasp” was used in the sentence to indicate that climbers must hold on to the rocks as they climb up the mountain. Another example is, “The doctor grasps for a bit of air, then tell the true situation to the family.” The word “grasp” in the sentence indicated that the doctor takes in a bit of air, then tells the actual situation to the family.

Gravitate

Gravitate is an intransitive verb. The definitions of gravitate are “to travel under the influence of gravitation,” “to move toward something,” or “to be pulled or captivated especially by natural inclination.” For example, “Later on, the conversation of the college batch mates gravitates to the most embarrassing moments in their college life.” The word “gravitate” was used in the sentence to imply that the conversation of college batch mates leads toward their most embarrassing moments. Another example is, “Most male kids gravitate towards basketball as a hobby.” The word “gravitates” was used in the sentence to indicate that most male kids are drawn or attracted to basketball as a hobby. 

Grip

Grip is a transitive verb. The definitions of grip are “to seize or hold firmly” or “to hold the interest of strongly.” For example, “The story of Gray’s Anatomy grips a huge audience even though it has numerous seasons.” The word “grip” was used in the sentence to imply that Gray’s Anatomy firmly holds the interest of a vast audience even though it has numerous seasons. Another example is, “The eldest of the family grips all the money and properties from their parents.” The word “grip” was used in the sentence to indicate that the eldest of the family seized all the money and properties of their parents.

Groan

Groan is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of groan are “to utter a deep moan demonstrative of pain, grief, or annoyance” or “to make a harsh sound, as of creaking, under sudden or prolonged strain.” For example, “The driver of the wrecked van groaned as the rescuer transferred him to the ambulance.” The word “groan” was used in the sentence to indicate that the driver uttered a moan to express pain. Another example is “Irritated employee groans to the massive workloads from the boss.” The word “groan” was used in the sentence to indicate that the employee uttered a moan to express annoyance at the massive workload from the boss.

Grope

Grope is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of grope are “to feel about blindly or uncertainly in search,” “to look for something blindly or uncertainly,” “to feel one’s way,” “feel up,” or “to find one’s way by groping.” For example, “The security guard gropes the door of the abandoned house in the middle of the night.” The word “grope” was used in the sentence to imply that the security guard blindly looks for the abandoned house door in the middle of the night. Another example is, “The maid gropes around in the dark in search of a candle.” The word “grope” was used in the sentence to indicate that the maid blindly finds the candle in the dark. 

Growl

Growl is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of growl are “rumble,” “to utter a growl,” “to complain angrily,” or “to utter with a growl or utter angrily.” For example, “The dog growl at all the stranger on the street.” The word “growl” was used in the sentence to indicate that the dog uttered angrily at all the strangers on the street. Another example is, “The kid growl because the served food smell awful.” The word “growl” was used in the sentence to imply that the kid complained angrily when the food served smelled awful. 

Guide

Guide is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of the guide are “to act as a guide or direct in a way or course,” “to direct, supervise, or influence usually to a particular end,” “to superintend the training or instruction,” or “to act or work as a guide.” For example, “The signage all over the streets guides the tourist going to the coffee shop” The word “guide” was used in the sentence to indicate that the signage all over the streets directs the tourist to the coffee shop. Another example is, “The parents guide their kids to the right path.” The word “guide” was used in the sentence to indicate that the parents guide the kids to go on the right path.

Gush

Gush is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of gush are “to issue copiously or violently,” “to emit a sudden copious flow,” “to make an effusive display of affection or enthusiasm,” or “to say or write effusively.” For example, “The girl gush about her favorite Korean actor.” The word “gush” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl made an effusive display of affection or enthusiasm about her favorite Korean actor. Another example is, “Water suddenly gushes under the kitchen sink.” The word “gush” was used in the sentence to indicate that water suddenly emitted under the kitchen sink. 

Hack

Hack is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hack are “to make chopping strokes or blows,” “to play inexpert golf,” “to cough in a short dry manner,” “loaf, commonly used with ‘around,’” “to write computer programs for enjoyment,” or “to gain access to a computer illegally.” For example, “An anonymous personality hacks the server of the prestigious outsourcing company.” The word “hack” was used in the sentence to imply that an anonymous personality illegally gained access to the server of a prestigious outsourcing company.” Another example is, “The workers to hack the branches of the tree.” The word “hack” was used in the sentence to imply that the workers chop the tree branches.

Hail

Hail is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hail are “to precipitate,” “to pour down or strike like hail,” “to greet with enthusiastic approval or acclaim,” “salute or greet,” or “to greet or summon by calling.” For example, “The royal guards hail as the queen entered the mansion.” The word “hail” was used in the sentence to indicate that the royal guards saluted or greeted as the queen entered the mansion. Another example is, “The man hails a taxi to the nearest hospital.” The word “hail” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man summoned or called a taxi to go to the nearest hospital.

Heighten

Heighten is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of heighten are “to increase the amount or degree or augment,” “to make brighter or more intense or deepen,” “to bring out more strongly or point up,” “to make more acute or sharpen,” or “elevate or to raise high or higher.” For example, “The mood in the room heightens the tension.” The word “heighten” was used in the sentence to indicate that the mood in the room raises the tension. Another example is, “The bartender heightens the level of alcohol of the newly invented cocktail compared to the first cocktail he made.” The word “heighten” was used in the sentence to indicate that the bartender increased the level of alcohol of the newly invented cocktail compared to the first cocktail.

Hobble

Hobble is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hobble are “to move along shakily or with problem,” “to cause to limp or cripple,” “to fasten together the legs of an animal to prevent straying,” and “to place under handicap or hamper, impede.” For example, “The old woma hobble from the market to get home.” The word “hobble” was used in the sentence to indicate that the old woman move along with difficulty from the market to get home. Another example is, “The high heels hobbled the model while walking on the stage.” The word “hobble” was used in the sentence to imply that the high heels caused them to limp or stumble the model while walking on the stage.

Hover

Hover is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hover are “to position a computer cursor over something, such as an image or icon without selecting it,” “to hang fluttering in the air or on the wing,” “to remain suspended over a place or object,” “to move to and fro near a place or fluctuate around a given point,” or “to be in a state of uncertainty, irresolution, or suspense.” For example, “The eagle hover around looking for a prey.” The word “hover” was used in the sentence to indicate that the eagle fluttered in the air looking for prey. Another example is, “The temperature hovered around seven degrees Celsius to eleven degrees Celsius.” The word “hover” was used in the sentence to imply that the temperature was uncertain, ranging from seven degrees Celsius to eleven degrees Celsius. 

Hurry

Hurry is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of hurry are “to carry or cause going with speed,” “to force to rash or precipitate action,” “to impel to greater speed or prod,” “expedite,” or “to perform, with undue haste.” For example, “Don’t hurry in life.” The word “hurry” was used in the sentence to mean that don’t rush or haste in life. Another example is, “The woman hurry and catch the last train.” The word “hurry” was used in the sentence that the woman moved quickly and caught the last train.

Ignite

Ignite is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of ignite are “to set afire,” “to subject to fire or intense heat,” “to cause a fuel to burn,” “to heat up or excite,” “to set in motion or spark,” or “to begin to glow.” For example, “The concert of the famous band ignites the crowd.” The word “ignite” was used in the sentence to indicate that the concert of the famous band excites the crowd. Another example is, “The stones ignite with friction.” The word “ignite” was used in the sentence to indicate that the stones heat up or set a fire with friction.” 

Illuminate

Illuminate is a transitive verb. The definitions of illuminate are “to supply or brighten with light,” “to enlighten spiritually or intellectual,” “to subject to radiation,” “to make clear or elucidate,” “to bring to the fore or highlight,” “to make illustrious or resplendent,” or “to decorate with gold or silver or brilliant colors or with often elaborate designs or miniature pictures.” For example, “The colorful Christmas lights illuminate the whole house.” The word “illuminate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the colorful Christmas lights supply or brighten the whole house. Another example is, “The professor illuminates the latest issue about the unjust grading system to the students.” The word “illuminate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the professor clarified the latest issue about the unjust grading system and enlightened the students. 

Inspect

Inspect is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of inspect are “to view closely in critical appraisal or look over,” “to examine officially,” or “to make an inspection.” For example, “The health worker inspect all the student.” The word “inspect” was used in the sentence to indicate that the health workers examine all the student. Another example is, “The widowed woman inspects the room where her husband dies.” The word “inspect” was used in the sentence to indicate that the widowed woman looked over the room. 

Instruct

Instruct is a transitive verb. The definitions of instruct are “to provide knowledge, teach or train,” “to supply with authoritative information or advice,” or “to give an order or command or direct.” For example, “Director instruct the right blocking in the set.” The word “instruct” was used in the sentence to indicate that the director to provide with authoritative information about the right blocking in the set. Another example, “The psychologists usually instruct the patient on how to practice self-care and self-love.” The word “instruct” was used in the sentence to indicate that psychologist usually give knowledge, teach, or train the patient on how to practice self-care and self-love.

Intensify

Intensify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of intensify are “to create intense or more comprehensive or strengthen,” “to create more keen or sharpen,” or “to boost the density and contrast of a photographic image by chemical treatment.” For example, “The problem has the possibility to intensify when not talked about.” The word “intensify” was used in the sentence to indicate that the problem has the possibility to increase or strengthen when not talked about. Another example is, “The aroma of the food intensifies when the chef adds the ingredients.” The word “intensify” was used in the sentence to imply that the aroma of the food became more intense when the chef added the ingredients. 

Intertwine

Intertwine is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of intertwine are “to unite by twinning one with another,” “to twine about one another,” or “to become mutually involved.” For example, “The couple’s hands intertwine after discussing their plans in life.” The word “intertwine” was used in the sentence to imply that the couple held or united each other’s hand after discussing their life plans. Another example is, “The customized earrings were made of gold intertwined with silver.” The word “intertwine” was used in the sentence to indicate that the customized earrings were made of gold combined or united with silver. 

Impart

Impart is a transitive verb. The definitions of impart are “to give, convey, or grant from or as if from a store,” “to give something to a thing,” “to make something known to someone,” or “to communicate the knowledge or disclose.” For example, “The incident hugely imparts a lesson to the individuals involved.” The word “impart” was used in the sentence to indicate that the incident conveyed a lesson to the involved individuals. Another example is, “The motivational speaker imparts knowledge and inspiration to the graduate students.” The word “impart” was used in the sentence to imply that the motivational speaker shares knowledge and inspiration with the graduate students.

Jostle

Jostle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of jostle are “to come in contract or into collision,” “to make one’s way by pushing and shoving,” “to exist in proximity,” “to vie in gaining an objective or contend,” or “to stir up or agitate.” For example, “The fans of the boy band jostle their way to the stage” The word “jostle” in the sentence indicates that the fans of the boy band made their way to the stage.” Another example is “The commotion outside the house horn loudly and jostles the sleeping baby.” The word “jostle” was used in the sentence to indicate that the commotion outside the house agitates or disturbs the sleeping baby.

Journey

Journey is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of journey is “to go on a journey or travel.” For example, “As the hiker journeyed upward, the elevation became steeper and more difficult.” The word “journey” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the elevation became steeper and more difficult as the hikers travel upwards. Another example, “It is her first time to journey overseas.” The word “journey” was used in the sentence to indicate that it is the girl’s first time to travel overseas.

Lash

Lash is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of lash are “to move intensely or unexpectedly or hurry,” “to thrash or beat violently,” “to make a verbal attack or retort,” “to strike or beat with or as if with a whip,” or “to assail with stinging words.” For example, “People lash at the suspect of a thief.” The word “lash” was used in the sentence to indicate that the people intensely beat the suspect of thief. Another example is, “The owner lashes the horse to move.” The word “lash” was used in the sentence to imply that the owner whips the horse to move.

Launch

Launch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of launch are “to throw ahead or hurl,” “to deliver, catapult, or transmit,” “to set a boat or ship afloat,” “to give a start,” “to put into operation or set in motion or initiate or introduce,” to get off a good start,” “to load into a computer’s memory and run,” “to enter energetically,” or “to slide down the ways.” For example, “The cosmetic line launched new shades of lipstick.” The word “launch” was in the past tense and used to indicate that the cosmetic line release new shades of lipstick. Another example, “Facebook was launched in February 2004.” The word “launch” was used in the sentence to imply that the Facebook started in February 2004.

Lead

Lead is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of lead are “to guide on the way especially by going in advance,” “to direct on a course or in a direction,” “to serve as a channel,” “to go through or live,” “to direct the operations, activity, or performance,” “to suggest to a witness the answer desired by asking leading questions,” “to bring to some conclusion or condition,” “to begin to play with,” or “to aim in front of a moving object.” For example, “The tour guide led the way inside the museum.” The word “lead” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the tour guide directed the way inside the museum. Another example is, “The captain basketball team led the game.” The word “lead” was used in the sentence to indicate that the basketball team’s captain began the game. 

Leap

Leap is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of leap are “to spring free from or as if from the ground or jump,” “to pass abruptly from one state or topic to another,” “to act precipitately,” “to provide help, protection, very quickly,” or “to pass over by leaping.” For example, “They fish in the bucket, leap.” The word “leap” was used in the sentence to indicate that the fish jumped from the bucket.” Another example is, “The man leaps the girl that gets in trouble.” The word “leap” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man protects the girl in trouble.

Locate

Locate is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of locate are “to establish oneself or one’s business or settle,” “to determine or indicate the place, site, or limits,” “to set or establish in a particular spot or station,” “to seek out and determine the location,” or “to find or fix the place of especially in a sequence or classify.” For example, “The doctor locate the cause of the consistent vomiting of the kid.” The word “locate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the doctor determined the cause of the consistent vomiting of the kid. Another example is, “The two girls locate their biological father.” The word “locate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the two girls found their biological father. 

Lurch

Lurch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of lurch are “to move with a lurch,” “stagger,” “to roll or tip abruptly or pitch,” “to defeat by a lurch,” “cheat or steal,” or “to loiter about a place furtively or prowl.” For example, “The train lurches forward but stranded in a deep gutter.” The word “lurch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the train staggered forward but was stranded in a deep gutter. Another example is, “The business has lurched from one problem to another.” The word “lurch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the business moves suddenly from one problem to another.

Lurk

Lurk is an intransitive verb. The definitions of lurk are “to lie in wait in a place of concealment especially for an evil purpose,” “to move furtively or inconspicuously,” “to persist in staying,” “to be concealed but capable of being discovered,” “to lie hidden,” or “to read messages without contributing on an internet discussion forum.” For example, “A suspicious man was lurking in a girl’s window.” The word “lurk” was in a present participle and used in the sentence to indicate that the man was secretly hiding in the window. Another example is, “The man is shy and just lurks on the girl’s social media accounts.” The word “lurk” was used in the sentence to mean that the man is shy and only views the girl’s social media accounts regularly without messaging or communicating with the girl. 

Magnify

Magnify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of magnify are “extol or laud,” “to cause to be held in greater esteem or respect,” “to increase in significance or intensify,” “exaggerate,” “to enlarge in fact or appearance,” or “to have the power of causing objects to appear larger than they are.” For example, “Grandma always magnifies the texts on the newspaper using glasses for her to read the news.” The word “magnify” was used in the sentence to indicate that the grandma enlarged the text on the newspaper using glasses to read the news. Another example is, “Every time I talk to my best friend, she always magnifies the things I should focus on.” The word “magnify” was used in the sentence to imply that the best friend increase in significance the things that should be focused on.”

Mimic

Mimic is a transitive verb. The definitions of mimic are “to imitate closely or ape,” “to ridicule by imitation,” “stimulate,” or “to resemble by biological mimicry.” For example, “Scottish and Australian are the most difficult accents to mimic.” The word “mimic” was used in the sentence to indicate that Scottish and Australian accents are some of the accents that are difficult to imitate. Another example is, “It is amazing that robots are able to mimic human movements and functions.” The word “mimic” is used in the sentence to indicate that the robots are able to stimulate human movements and functions.

Mint

Mint is a transitive verb. The definitions of mint are “to make coins or money out of metal,” “create or produce,” or “to cause to attain an indicated status.” For example, “Does anyone know how they mint coins?” The word “mint” was used in the sentence to indicate if anyone knows how they made coins out of metal. Another example is, “The parents are proud of their newly minted lawyer.” The word “mint” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the parents are proud because their child attained an indicated status: his lawyer.

Moan

Moan is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of moan are “to bewail audibly or lament,” “to utter with moans,” “complain,” “to make a moan or groan,” or “to emit a sound resembling a moan.” For example, “The man experienced severe stomachache, and made him moan all night in his room.” The word “moan” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man groans because of a severe stomachache. Another example is, “Commuters always moan about the endless traffic daily.” The word “moan” was used in the sentence to imply that the commuters complain about the traffic.

Modify

Modify is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of modify are “to make less extreme or moderate,” “to limit or add to its meaning especially in a grammatical construction,” “to change by an umlaut,” “to make minor changes,” or “to make basic or fundamental changes in often to give a new orientation to or to serve a new end.” For example, “Last one minute of the exam, but the student still modifies some words in her essay.” The word “modify” was used in the sentence to indicate that the student still changes some phrases in the essay for the last minute of the exam. Another example, “In the sentence ‘the yellow flower blooms beautifully.,’ the adjective ‘yellow’ modifies the noun ‘flower.’” The word “modifies” was used in the sentence to indicate that the adjective “yellow” was added to the noun “flower.”

Multiply

Multiply is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of multiply are “to expand in number in multiples or enlarge,” “to look the product of by multiplication,” “to use as a multiplicand in multiplication with another number,” “to become greater or spread,” “breed or propagate,” or “to execute multiplication.” For example, “The obligations multiply as we grow older.” The word “multiply” indicates that obligations increase as we grow older. Another example is, “The answer is ten if two is multiplied by five.” The word “multiply” was used in the sentence to imply that the answer is ten if two is used as a multiplicand in multiplication with five. 

Muse

Muse is a transitive and an intransitive verb. The definitions of muse are “to become absorbed in thought,” “to think about something carefully and thoroughly,” “wonder or marvel,” or “to think or say thoughtfully.” For example, in “The mother muse about what to eat for dinner,” The word “muse” was used to indicate that the mother thinks carefully and thoroughly about what to eat for dinner. Another example is, “The teacher muses the final grades to the students.” The word “muse” was used in the sentence to imply that the teacher thinks or says the final grades thoughtfully to the students. 

Mushroom

Mushroom is an intransitive verb. The definitions of mushroom are “to well up and disperse laterally from a main source,” “to become increased or extensive or grow rapidly,” “to collect wild mushrooms,” or “to spring up suddenly or multiply rapidly.” For example, “The number of infected people mushroomed after it was discovered.” The word “mushroom” was used in the sentence to indicate that the number of infected people rapidly grew after it was discovered. Another example is, “A flower finally mushrooms from the yard.” The word “mushroom” was used in the sentence to imply that a flower finally springs up from the yard.

Mystify

Mystify is a transitive verb. The definitions of mystify are “to perplex the mind or bewilder” or “to make mysterious or obscure.” For example, “The kid’s disappearance mystifies the family and the investigators.” The word “mystify” was used in the sentence to imply that the kid’s disappearance makes the family and investigator confused and puzzled. Another example is, “An unknown person often sends unnamed gifts and letters, mystifies the girl.” The word “mystify” was used in the sentence to imply the unknown person perplexed the girl’s mind by sending anonymous gifts and flowers.

Notice

Notice is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of notice are “to give notice,” “to comment upon,” “to treat with attention or civility,” “to become aware of something or someone,” or “to give a formal notice.” For example, “The bank teller notice that one customer has a gun and immediately calls the police.” The word “notice” was used in the sentence to mean that the bank teller became aware that one customer had a gun. Another example is, “No one notices the sadness on her face.” The word “notice” was used in the sentence to imply that no one treats her with attention or is aware of the sadness on her face of the girl.

Notify

Notify is a transitive verb. The definitions of notify are “to give formal notice,” “to give notice of or report the occurrence of,” or “to point out.” For example, “The senior in the team notifies the management first before making a big move.” The word “notify” was used in the sentence to indicate that the senior in the team gave formal notice to the management before making a big move. Another example is, “The guards notify the president of the arrival of the important guest.” The word “notify” was used in the sentence to mean that the guards reported the arrival of the important guest. 

Obtain

Obtain is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of obtain are “to gain or usually attain by planned action or effort” or “to be generally recognized or established or prevail.” For example, “The workers obtained their first increase in salary because they appeal to the management.” The word “obtain” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the workers gained their first increase in their salary because they appealed to the management.” Another example is, “The youngest of the family obtained a doctor’s degree at the age of 35.” The word “obtain” was used in the sentence to indicate that the youngest in the family succeeded in gaining a doctor’s degree at the age of 35.

Oppress

Oppress is a transitive verb. The definitions of oppress are “to crush or burden by control or power or authority,” “suppress,” or “to burden spiritually or mentally, weigh heavily upon.” For example, “No one can oppress a strong and independent woman.” The word “oppress” was used in the sentence to indicate that no one is able to burden a strong and independent woman spiritually or mentally. Another example is “The government oppresses unfortunate people.” The word “oppress” was used in the sentence to mean that the government was crushed or burdened the unfortunate people by the abuse of power or authority.

Order

Order is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of order are “to put in order or arrange,” “to give an order or command,” “destine or ordain,” “to command to go or come to a specified place,” or “regulate.” For example, “The enemy ordered a ceasefire.” The word “order” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to imply that the enemy command for ceasefire. Another example, “On the first day of school, the teacher ordered the students to clean the room.” The word “order” was used in the sentence that the teacher gave an order to the student to clean the room. 

Paint

Paint is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of paint are “to apply color, pigment, or paint,” “to apply with a movement resembling that used in painting,” “to treat with a liquid by brushing or swabbing,” and “to depict by such lines and colors,” “to touch up or cover over by or as if by painting,” “to depict as having specified or implied characteristics,” or “to use cosmetics.” For example, “The man paints a smile on the girl’s face.” The word “paint” was used in the sentence to imply that the man drew a smile on the girl’s face. Another example is, “The girl painted her nails nude.” The word “paint” was in the past tense form and used in the sentence to indicate that the girl applied color to the nude nails. 

Park

Park is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of park are “to enclose in a park,” “to bring a vehicle to a stop and keep standing at the edge of a public way,” “to leave temporarily on a public way or in a parking lot or garage,” “to land and leave an aircraft in an assigned or accessible location,” “to establish something, such as a satellite in orbit,” “to set and leave temporarily,” or “to place, settle, or establish especially for a considerable time.” For example, “The truck driver parked the car and checked the engine.” The word “park” was used in the sentence in the past tense form to indicate that the truck driver stopped, kept the vehicle standing at the edge of a public way, and checked the engine. Another example is, “The housekeeper forgot that she parked the vacuum inside the room.” The word “park” was used in the sentence to indicate that the housekeeper forgot that the vacuum was set and left temporarily inside the room.

Peck

Peck is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of peck are “to strike or pierce especially repeatedly with the bill or a pointed tool,” “to kiss someone quickly,” “to give some “to make by pecking,” “to pick up with the bill,” “carp or nag,” or “to eat reluctantly and in small bites.” For example, “The birds peck all the worms given by their mother.” The word “peck” was used in the sentence that the birds ate the worms reluctantly and in small bites. Another example is, “The father pecked the baby’s foot.” The word “peck” was used in the sentence to indicate that the father quickly kissed the baby’s foot. 

Peek

Peek is an intransitive verb. The definitions of peek are “to look furtively,” “to peer through a crack or hole or from a place, or concealment,” or “to take a brief look or glance.” For example, “The lady peeked at the peephole to look directly at who rang the doorbell outside the door.” The word “peek” was used in the sentence to indicate that the lady took a brief look or glanced through the peephole to look directly at who rang the doorbell outside the door. Another example is, “She peeks on the window to check the commotion outside.” The word “peek” was used in the sentence to indicate that the girl peers through the window with concealment to check the commotion outside. 

Peer

Peer is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of peer are “to look narrowly or curiously,” “to look searchingly at something difficult to discern, or squint to see more clearly,” “to come slightly into view, emerge partly,” or “rival or match.” For example, “The mother noticed that the kid has poor eyesight because she peered every time she needed to read something.” The word “peer” was used in the sentence to indicate the mother noticed that the kid has poor eyesight because the kid squint to see more clearly when reading something. Another example is, “The grandmother peer to check if the dog is inside the room.” The word “peer” was used in the sentence to indicate that the grandmother came slightly to check if the dog was inside the room.

Perceive

Perceive is a transitive verb. The definitions of perceive are “to attain awareness or understanding,” “to regard as being such,” “to become aware of through the senses,” or “see or observe.” For example, “Computer programming is perceived as a complicated course.” The word “perceive” was in the past tense and used in the sentence that computer programming is regarded as a challenging course. Another example is, “It is easy to perceive the changes in someone’s behavior.” The word “perceive” was used in the sentence to indicate that it is easy to become aware of or see the changes in someone’s behavior.

Picture

Picture is a transitive verb. The definitions of picture are “to form a mental image or imagine,” “to describe graphically in words,” or “to paint or draw a representation, image, or visual conception, or depict.” For example, “They picture what it would be like to have an honest and clean government.” The word “picture” was used in the sentence to imply that they imagine having an honest and clean government. Another example is, “Farmers are pictured in the magazine, exhibiting their daily lives.” The word “picture” was used in the sentence to indicate that the farmers were in a magazine with photographs or pictures exhibiting their daily lives. 

Pilot

Pilot is a transitive verb. The definitions of pilot are “to act as a guide to or lead or conduct over a usually difficult course,” “to set and conn the course of,” or “to act as pilot.” For example, “The first time captain successfully piloted the plane.” The word “pilot” was used in the sentence to indicate that the captain successfully steered the plane. Another example is, “The assistant piloted the important guest to the VIP room.” The word “pilot” was used in the sentence to indicate that the assistant led or guided the important guest to the VIP room.

Pinpoint

Pinpoint is a transitive verb. The definitions of pinpoint are “to locate or aim with great precision or accuracy,” “to fix, determine, or identify with precision,” or “to cause to stand out conspicuously or highlight.” For example, “The audience was amazed when the magician correctly pinpoints the chosen card.” The word “pinpoint” was used in the sentence to imply that the audience was amazed when the magician correctly identified the chosen card with precision. Another example is, “The physician pinpoints the cause of frequent headache of the patient.” The word “pinpoint” was used in the sentence to indicate that the doctor located with great precision the cause of the frequent headaches of the patient.

Place

Place is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of place are “to put in a particular place or position,” “to present for consideration,” “to put in a particular state,” “to direct to the desired spot,” and “to cause to produce free and well-resonated singing or speaking tones,” “to assign to a position in a series or category,” or “to distribute in an orderly manner or arrange.” For example, “The staff placed all the frozen goods near the grocery store counter.” The word “place” was used in the sentence to indicate that the staff put in a particular place all the frozen goods, which is near the counter of the grocery store. Another example is, “The girl places first in the singing contest.” The word “place” was used in the sentence to indicate that the girl was assigned as the first in the singing contest.

Plant

Plant is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of plant are “to put or set in the ground for growth,” “to set or sow with seeds or plants,” “implant,” “establish or institute,” or “to covertly place for discovery, publication, or dissemination.” For example, “The armed men planted the bomb near the target’s area.” The word “plant” was used in the sentence to imply that the armed men set in the ground the bomb near the target’s area. Another example is, “The gardeners plant various kinds of seeds in their land every month.” The word “plant” was used in the sentence to mean that the gardeners put in the ground various kinds of seeds for growth on their land every month. 

Plop

Plop is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of plop are “to fall, drop, or flick with a sound like that of something dropping into water,” “to allow the body to drop heavily,” or “to place or set carelessly or hastily.” For example, “The drunk man accidentally plopped his phone in the pale full of water.” The word “plop” was used in the sentence to mean that the drunk man accidentally dropped the phone in the pale full of water. Another example is, “The nurse plopped onto the bed after 18 hours of work.” The word “plop” was used in the sentence to indicate that the nurse allowed the body to drop heavily onto the bed after a straight 18 hours of work. 

Pluck

Pluck is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of pluck are “to pull or pick off or out,” “to remove something such as hairs,” “rob or fleece,” “to move, remove, or separate forcibly or abruptly,” “to play by surrounding the strings with the fingers or a pick,” or “to make a sharp pull or twitch.” For example, “The kids often pluck white hairs whenever they are with their grandfather.” The word “pluck” was used in the sentence to imply that the kids often remove white hairs every time they are with their grandfather. Another example is, “The guitarist plucks the guitar string to indicate that the concert is about to start.” The word “pluck” was used in the sentence to imply that the guitarist plays the guitar by surrounding the strings with the fingers or a pick to indicate that the concert is about to start. 

Plunge

Plunge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of plunge are “to cause to infiltrate or enter rapidly and forcefully into something,” “to cause to enter a state or course of action, usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently,” “to fall or drop suddenly in amount, value, etc.,” “to thrust or cast oneself into a water,” “to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,” or “to descend or dip suddenly.” For example, “They plunge from a high place.” The word “plunge” was used in the sentence to indicate that people pitched or were thrown down from a high place. Another example is, “The number of subscribers of the popular couple vlogger plunged from 3 million to 2.5 million after the spread of the issue.” The word “plunge” was used in the sentence to mean that the number of subscribers of the famous couple fell or dropped suddenly in amount, which is from 3 million to 2.5 million after the spread of the issue.

Poison

Poison is a transitive verb. The definitions of poison are “to injure or kill with poison,” “to treat, taint, or impregnate with or as if with poison,” “to have a bad effect on something,” “to exert a harmful influence on or corrupt,” or “to inhibit the activity, course, or occurrence of.” For example, “It is still unknown who poison the juice of the businessman.” The word “poison” was used in the sentence to imply that it is still unknown who put poison in the juice or tried to kill the businessman with poison.” Another example is, “The inappropriate content on the internet poisoned the mind of the minors.” The word “poison” was used in the sentence to indicate that the inappropriate on the internet has a harmful influence on the mind of minors. 

Pop

Pop is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of pop are “to punch or knock sharply or hit,” “to push, put, or thrust suddenly or briefly,” “to cause exploding or burst open,” “to fire at or shoot,” and “to flip something into an upturned position.” For example, ” The parlor game players pop the balloon by sitting on it.” The word “pop” was used in the sentence to show that the parlor game players caused the balloon to make an explosive sound by sitting on it. Other definitions of “pop” are “to go, come, or appear suddenly,” “to escape or break away from something unexpectedly,” “to take, such as pills, frequently or habitually,” “to open very wide,” or “to hit a pop fly.” For example, “The girl didn’t expect a ring to pop from a box given by her boyfriend.” The word “pop” was used in the sentence to indicate that the girl didn’t expect a ring is going to come out of a box.

Position

Position is a transitive verb. The definition of position is “to put something or someone in a certain position.” For example, “The interior designer positioned the dining area on the west part of the house, connected to the kitchen.” The word “position” was used in the sentence to show that the interior designer put the dining area on the west part of the house, connected to the kitchen. Another example is, “The head of the team positioned the most reliable employee to the more difficult work.” The word “position” was used in the sentence to mean that the head of the team put the most reliable employee to the more difficult work.

Power

Power is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of power are “to supply with power and especially motive power,” “to give impetus to,” or “to move with great speed or force.” For example, “The kid’s big dollhouse with lights are powered by batteries.” The word “power” was used in the sentence to indicate that the batteries supply with power the kid’s big dollhouse with lights. Another example, “The defending champion in triathlon powered through the final lap of the competition.” The word “power” was used in the sentence to show that the defending champion in triathlon move very quickly through the final lap of the competition.

Prickle

Prickle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of prickle are “to prick slightly,” “to cause or experience an unpleasant feeling of having many small, sharp points against the skin,” “to experience a burning or cold feeling caused by a strong emotion,” or “to produce prickles in.” For example, “The flower’s thorn prickles the skin.” The word “prickle” was used in the sentence to imply that the flower’s thorn causes an unpleasant feeling against the skin. Another example is, “The man’s face prickled when he heard the bad news.” The word “prickle” was used in the sentence to imply that the man’s face experienced a burning or cold feeling when he heard the bad news. 

Probe

Probe is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the probe are “to search into and study completely or subject to a penetrating investigation” or “to examine with a probe.” For example, “The prosecutor probed for the possible powerful evidence to prove that the suspect is guilty.” The word “probe” was used in the sentence to indicate that the prosecutor searched and investigated for possible powerful evidence to prove that the suspect was guilty. Another example is, “The man probes for the girl’s private information.” The word “probe” was used in the sentence to imply that the man searched for the girl’s private information.

Prune

Prune is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of prune are “to reduce, especially by eliminating superfluous matter” or “to cut off parts for better shape or more fruitful growth.” For example, “The gardener prunes the lush plants every month.” The word “prune” was used in the sentence to indicate that the gardener cut off the lush plants for better shape. Another example is, “The best time to prune plants is during spring.” The word “prune” was used in the sentence to imply that the best time to reduce the plants is during spring.

Realize

Realize is a transitive verb. The definitions of realize are “to bring into concrete existence or accomplish,” “to cause to seem real or appear real,” “to be sold for a particular amount of money,” “to convert into actual money,” “to bring or get by sale, investment, or effort or gain,” or “to conceive vividly as real or be fully aware.” For example, “The woman realized that the man was cheating on her.” The word “realize” was used in the sentence to indicate that the woman became fully aware that the man was cheating. Another example is, “The house was realized at $845,000.” The word “realize” was used in the sentence to imply that the house was sold at $845,000.

Recite

Recite is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of recite are “to repeat from memory or read aloud publicly,” “to relate in full,” “to give a recital of or detail,” or “to repeat or answer questions about a lesson.” For example, “The student recites the poem in front of the whole class.” The word “recite” was used in the sentence to indicate that the student read the poem aloud in front of the class. Another example is, “The secretary recites the meeting schedule to the director.” The word “recite” was used in the sentence to show that the secretary gave the details of the meeting schedule to the director. 

Recoil

Recoil is an intransitive verb. The definitions of recoil are “to retreat under pressure,” “to shrink back physically or emotionally,” “to bounce back to or as if to a starting point or rebound,” or “degenerate.” For example, “The woman immediately recoiled when the man showed his true color.” The word “recoil” was used in the sentence to indicate that the woman immediately shrinks back emotionally when the man shows true colors. Another example is, “The experiment needs to recoil to get the correct result.” The word “recoil” was used in the sentence to imply that the experiment needed to spring back to a starting point to get the correct result.

Refashion

Refashion is a transitive verb. The definitions of refashion are “fashion something again or differently” or “remake or alter.” For example, “The designer refashioned the details of the gown.” The word “refashion” was used in the sentence to indicate that the designer fashioned the gown differently. Another example is, “The architect refashions the old house into a modern one.” The word “refashion” was used in the sentence to indicate that the architect remade or altered the old house into a modern house. 

Refine

Refine is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of refine are “to free from impurities or undesired material,” “to free from moral flaw or elevate,” “to improve or perfect by pruning or polishing,” “to reduce in vigor or intensify,” “to free from what is coarse, vulgar, or uncouth,” or “to become pure or perfected.” For example, “The owner refine the old business plan.” The word “refine” was used in the sentence to imply that the owner polish the old plan of the business. Another example is, “Most sugar in the grocery store is refined.” The word “refine” was used in the sentence to indicate that most of the sugar in the grocery store is free from impurities or unwanted material. 

Remove

Remove is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of remove are “to change the location, position, station, or residence of,” “to transfer a legal proceeding from one court to another,” “to move by lifting, pushing aside or taking away or off,” “to dismiss from office,” “to get rid of or eliminate,” or “to be capable of being removed.” For example, “Toner is a liquid that removes dead skin cells and moisture the skin.” The word “remove” was used in the sentence to imply that the toner is a liquid that gets rid of and eliminates dead skin cells. Another example is, “The boy immediately removed his cap inside the church.” The word “remove” was used in the sentence that the man takes off the cap.

Report

Report is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of report are “to give an account of or relate,” “to describe as being in a specified state,” “to serve as a carrier of a message,” “to make a written record or summary of,” “to prepare or present an account of for broadcast,” “to give a formal or official account or statement of,” “to announce or relate as the result of the investigation,” or “to make known to the proper authorities.” For example, “An accident was reported 6 hours after it happened.” The word “report” was used in the sentence to imply that the accident was announced 6 hours after it happened. Another example is, “The student reports the whole lesson for the history.” The word “report” was used in the sentence to imply that the students prepared or presented the whole lesson for the history.

Retreat

Retreat is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of retreat are “to make a retreat or withdraw,” “to slope backward,” “to draw or lead back or remove,” or “to move back.” For example, “The soldiers retreat when one of them got severely injured.” The word “retreat” was used in the sentence to imply that the soldiers withdrew or moved back when one of them got severely injured. Another example is “The counselor retreat from running for the governor position.” The word “retreat” was used in the sentence to show that the counselor withdrew from running for the governor position.

Reveal

Reveal is a transitive verb. The definitions of reveal are “to make known through divine inspiration,” “to make publicly or generally known,” or “to open up to view or display.” For example, “The police revealed the suspects as soon as they caught them in the buy-bust operation.” The word “reveal” was used in the sentence to imply that the police made the suspects known publicly as soon as they caught them in the buy-bust operation. Another example is, “The artist reveals all the artworks he made through an exhibit,” The word “reveal” was used in the sentence to imply that the artist opened up all the artworks to open up or display through an exhibit. 

Reverberate

Reverberate is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of reverberate are “reflect,” “repel,” “echo,” “to become driven back,” “to cause effects afterward,” “to become reflected,” or “to continue in or as if in a series of echoes or resound.” For example, “Their voice reverberate when they shout inside the cave.” The word “reverberate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the voice echo when they shout inside the cave. Another example is, “The foolish man doesn’t know that his actions are able to reverberate in the future.” The word “reverberate” was used in the sentence to indicate that the foolish man doesn’t know that his actions are able to cause future effects. 

Revitalize

Revitalize is a transitive verb. The definitions of revitalize are “to give a new life or vigor to,” “to make something grow, develop, or become successful again,” or “to put new life or energy into something.” For example, “The lotion revitalizes the skin.” The word “revitalize” was used in the sentence to indicate that the lotion gives new life to the skin. Another example is, “The goal of the newly appointed student president is to revitalize the school.” The word “revitalize” was used in the sentence to indicate that the newly appointed student president’s goal is to give the school new life. 

Revolutionize

Revolutionize is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of revolutionize are “to bring down the government,” “to infuse with revolutionary beliefs,” “to modify fundamentally or completely,” or “to involve in revolution.” For example, “The residents want to revolutionize the current government officials and its anti-poor policies.” The word “revolutionize” was used in the sentence to imply that the residents wanted to overthrow the current government officials and their anti-poor policies. Another example is, “The incident revolutionized the man’s life.” The word “revolutionized” was used in the sentence to indicate that the incident completely changed that man’s life. 

Revolve

Revolve is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of revolve are “to turn over at length in mind or ponder,” “to cause going around in orbit,” “recur,” “to ponder something,” to remain under construction,” “to move in a curved path around a center or axis,” or “to have or come to a specified focus or center.” For example, “The life of the kid revolves around taekwondo.” The word “revolve” was used in the sentence to indicate that the kid’s life focuses on taekwondo. Another example is, “The earth revolves around the sun in 365 days, 5 hours, 59 minutes, and 16 seconds.” The word “revolve” was used in the sentence to imply that the earth orbit or move in a curved path around the sun for 365 days, 5 hours, 59 minutes and 16 seconds. 

Rip

Rip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of rip are “to tear or split apart or open,” “to saw or split with the grain,” “to hit sharply,” “to utter violently or spit out,” criticize or disparage,” “to become ripped or rend,” or “to rush headlong.” For example, “The excited girl ripped the wrapper of the gift given by her parents.” The word “rip” was used in the sentence to indicate that the excited girl tear or split apart the wrapper of the gift. Another example is, “An unauthorized person ripped the office.” The word “rip” was used in the sentence to indicate that an unauthorized person rushed headlong in the office. 

Rise

Rise is an intransitive verb. The definitions of rise are “to assume an upright position such as from lying, kneeling, or sitting,” “to return from death,” “to take up arms,” “to respond warmly or applaud,” “to end a session or adjourn,” “to appear above the horizon,” “to move upward or ascend,” “to extend above other objects,” “to increase in fervor or intensify,” “to attain a higher level or rank,” “to take place or happen,” “to follow as a consequence or result,” or “to exert oneself to meet a challenge.” For example, “One of the best times of the day is when the sun rises in the morning.” The word “rise” was used in the sentence to imply that one of the best time of the day is when the sun moves upward or ascend in the morning. Another example is, “The audience rises after the heart-warming performance of the auditionee.” The word “rise” was used in the sentence to indicate that the audience applauded and responded warmly after the heart-warming performance to the auditionee. 

Ruin

Ruin is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of ruin are “to damage irreparably,” “bankrupt or impoverish,” “to cause someone to lose money, social status, etc.,” “to subject to frustration, failure, or disaster,” “to reduce to ruins or devastate,” or “to become ruined.” For example, “Don’t ruin someone’s trust.” The word “ruin” was used in the sentence to imply that don’t damage someone’s trust. Another example is “The issue ruined the celebrity’s career.” The word “ruin” was used in the sentence to indicate that the issue caused the celebrity’s career to lose. 

Rush

Rush is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of rush are “to move ahead, advancement, or act with speed or eagerness or without preparation,” “to advance a football by running plays,” “to push or impel on or forward with speed, impetuosity, or violence,” “to perform in a short time or at high speed,” “to urge to an unnatural or extreme speed,” “to run toward or against in attack or charge,” “to carry forward in a running play,” or “to lavish attention or court.” For example, “They rush to the airport because they are late for their flight to Canada.” The word “rush” was used in the sentence to imply that they went to the airport at high speed because they were late for their flight to Canada.” Another example is, “The captain of the team rushed for a total of 100 yards.” The word “rush” was used in the sentence to imply that the team captain advanced a total of 150 yards in football. 

Rust

Rust is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of rust are “to form rust or become oxidized,” “to degenerate especially from inaction, lack of use, or passage of time,” “to become reddish brown as if with rust,” and “to be affected with a rust fungus,” “to impair or corrode by as if by time, inactivity, or deleterious use,” or “to cause to become reddish brown or turn the color of rust.” For example, “The metal rusts because it was in the water for three weeks.” The word “rust” was used in the sentence to indicate that the metal became oxidized because it was in the water for three weeks. Another example is “The love of the woman for piano rust after several years of not playing.” The word “rust” was used in the sentence to show that the love of the woman for the piano degenerated after several years of not playing. 

Saunter

Saunter is an intransitive verb. The definition of saunter is “to walk about in an idle or leisurely manner or stroll.” For example, “The most exciting part in taking a vacation is to saunter to various tourist destinations in the city.” The word “saunter” was used in the sentence to indicate that the most exciting part of taking a vacation is to walk leisurely or stroll to various tourist destinations in the city. Another example is, “They sauntered inside the museum to appreciate the artworks.” The word “saunter” was used in the sentence to indicate that they walk about idly or leisurely, or stroll inside the museum to appreciate the artworks.

Scamper

Scamper is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of scamper is “to run nimbly and usually playfully about.” For example, “It is enjoyable to watch the dogs scampering around.” The word “scamper” was used in the sentence to imply that watching the dogs playing and nimbly running is enjoyable. Another example is, “The family enjoys scampering around the yard as a form of bonding.” The word “scamper” was used in the sentence to imply that the family enjoys running around the yard as a form of family bonding. 

Scan

Scan is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the scan are “to read or mark to show metrical structure,” “to examine by point-by-point observation or checking,” “to systematically examine to obtain data, especially for display or storage,” “to pass over in the formation of an image,” “to scan verse,” or “to conform to a metrical pattern.” For example, “The doctor scans the patient’s brain.” The word “scan” was used in the sentence to imply that the doctor examines by point-by-point observation or to check the patient’s brain. Another example is, “The student scan the economics book before the final exam.” The word “scan” was used in the sentence to indicate that the student read the economics book before the final exam. 

Scorch

Scorch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of scorch are “to burn a surface to change its color and texture,” “to dry or wither with intense heat or parch,” “to afflict distressingly with censure or sarcasm,” “to destroy before abandoning or devastate,” “to move or travel at great and usually excessive speed,” or “to cause intense heat or mental anguish.” For example, “The snatchers scorch when they saw the police.” The word “scorch” was used in the sentence to show that the snatchers quickly moved when they saw the police. Another example is, “It is normal that the pan scorch after cooking.” The word “scorch” was used in the sentence to imply that it is expected that the pan burns a surface and changes its color after cooking.

Scrape

Scrape is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of scrape are “to eliminate from a surface by usually repeated strokes of a sharpened instrument,” “to create smooth or clean with strokes of an edged instrument or an abrasive,” “to grate harshly over or against,” “to damage or injure the surface of by contact with a rough surface,” “to draw roughly or noisily over a surface,” “to collect by scraping,” “to accumulate money by small economies,” or “to make one’s way with difficulty or barely manage or succeed.” For example, “The hiker accidentally scrapes his elbow on the rock as they ascend the mountain.” The word “scrape” was used in the sentence to imply that the hiker’s elbow was damaged and injured from the rock as they ascended the mountain. Another example is, “The kids scrape the melted candles on the cemetery.” The word “scrape” was used in the sentence to indicate that the kids removed the melted candles from the cemetery by repeated strokes. 

Scratch

Scratch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of scratch are “to poke with the claws or nails,” “to scrub and tear or mark the surface of with something sharp or jagged,” “to rub gently,” and “to scrape together or collect with difficulty or by effort,” “to write or draw on a surface,” “to cancel or erase by or as if by drawing a line through,” “scribble or scrawl,” or “to scrape a rugged surface.” For example, “The man excitedly scratched the ticket with a coin to know if he won a prize.” The word “scratch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man excitedly rubbed the ticket with a coin.” Another example is, “Cats scratch the back of their ears.” The word “scratch” was used in the sentence to show that cats dig the back of their ears with claws. 

Scrawl

Scrawl is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of scrawl is “to write or draw awkwardly, hastily, or carelessly.” For example, “The toddler scrawls various lines on the floor using a marker.” The word “scrawl” was used in the sentence to indicate that the toddler carelessly wrote various lines on e the floor using a marker. Another example is, “The artist scrawls different images using spray paint on the wall.” The word “scrawl” was used in the sentence to indicate that the artist drew different images using spray paint on the wall. 

Seize

Seize is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of seize are “to bestow ownership of a freehold estate,” “to keep something,” “take away,” “capture,” “hold,” “apprehend,” “afflict,” “to bind or fasten together with a lashing of small stuff,” “to take or lay hold suddenly or forcibly,” “to cohere to a relatively moving part through excessive pressure, temperature, or friction,” or “to fail to function due to the seizing of a part.” For example, “The robbers seize all jewelry and expensive things in the house.” The word “seize” was used in the sentence to imply that the robbers took all the jewelry and expensive things in the house. Another example is, “The policemen seize the killer together with all the evidence.” The word “seize” was used in the sentence to imply that the policemen arrested the killer together with all the evidence. 

Serve

Serve is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of serve are “to be a servant,” “to assistant or as a server at mass,” “to be of use,” “to be advantageous, fortunate, or convenient,” and “to be worthy of reliance or trust,” “to hold an office or discharge a duty or function,” “to prove adequate or satisfactory or suffice,” “to provide something” “to put the ball or shuttlecock in play,” “suffice,” “to bring to notice, deliver, or execute as required by law,” or “to copulate with.” For example, “The footprints on the snow serve as the guide to the temple.” The word “serve” was used in the sentence to imply that the footprints on the snow are to be used as a guide to the temple. Another example is, “The mother serves delicious snacks for the family every 3 pm.” The word “serve” was used in the sentence to indicate that the mother provides delicious snacks for the family every 3 pm.

Shatter

Shatter is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shatter are “to cause dropping or be spread,” “to break into pieces,” “destroy or wreck,” “to break apart or disintegrate,” or “to drop off a part.” For example, “The mother’s heart shattered every time they saw their child hurt.” The word “shatter” was used in the sentence to imply that the mother’s heart breaks or is upset every time they see their child hurt. Another example is, “All houses were shattered due to the tornado.” The word “shatter” was used in the sentence to show that all houses were ruined due to the tornado. 

Shepherd

Shepherd is a transitive verb. The definitions of shepherd are “to tend as a shepherd,” “to watch over carefully,” or “to guide or guard in the manner of a shepherd.” For example, “The traffic enforcer shepherds the old woman to the nearest hospital.” The word “shepherd” was used in the sentence to indicate that the traffic enforcer guided the old woman to the nearest hospital. Another example is, “The teachers shepherd the students while in school.” The word “shepherd” was used in the sentence to imply that the teachers watch over the students while in school carefully. 

Shimmer

Shimmer is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shimmer are “to glow with a soft trembling light or glimmer,” “to reflect an uncertain distorted visual image,” or “to cause a shimmer.” For example, “The glasses shimmer as the sun reflect them.” The word “shimmer” was used in the sentence to indicate that the glasses shine with soft tremulous light or sparkle as the sun reflects on them. Another example is, “The lips shimmer because of the cosmetic brand’s newly released lip gloss.” The word “shimmer” was used in the sentence to show that the lips glimmer or shine because of the newly released lip gloss of a cosmetic brand.

Shine

Shine is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shine are “to emit rays of light,” “to be bright by the reflection of light,” “to be eminent, conspicuous, or distinguished,” “to perform extremely well,” “to have a bright glowing appearance,” or “to be conspicuously evident or clear.” For example, “The moon shines so brightly.” The word “shine” was used in the sentence to indicate that the moon has a bright, glowing appearance. Another example is, “The candidate shines as she walks on the stage with confidence.” The word “shine” was used in the sentence to show that the candidate performed extremely well, as the girl walked on the stage with confidence.

Shock

Shock is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shock are “to strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust,” “to cause to undergo a physical or nervous shock,” ”to offend or upset someone by doing or saying something immoral or unacceptable,” “to subject to the action of an electrical discharge,” “to drive by a shock,” “to cause surprise or shock,” “to meet with a shock or collide,” or “to meet with a shock or collide.” For example, “The passing of the veteran actor shocks the whole world.” The word “shock” was used in the sentence to imply that the passing of the veteran actor caused a surprise to the whole world. Another example is, “The 18-year-old girl was shocked when she discovered that her mother was battered by her father.” The word “shock” was used in the sentence to indicate that the 18-year-old girl was upset when she discovered that her mother was battered by her father. 

Shrivel

Shrivel is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of shrivel are “to draw into wrinkles, especially with a loss of moisture,” “to become much smaller than is needed or wanted,” “to become reduced to inanition, helplessness, or inefficiency,” or “to cause to shrivel.” For example, “The skin shrivels without sunscreen or moisturizer.” The word “shrivel” was used in the sentence to imply that the skin draws wrinkles or becomes dry without sunscreen or moisturizer. Another example is, “Most of the sales of businesses shriveled during the Covid-19 pandemic.” The word “shrivel” was used in the sentence to imply that most of the sales of businesses became much smaller than is needed or wanted during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Sizzle

Sizzle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sizzle are “to burn up or sear with or as if with a hissing sound,” “to make a sound like food cooking in hot fat,” “to be interesting or exciting,” “to be very sexually attractive,” “to be very hot,” or “to seethe with deep anger or resentment.” For example, “The steak sizzled as the chef placed it on the pan with butter.” The word “sizzle” was used in the sentence to imply that the steak made a sound as the chef placed it on the pan with butter. Another example is, “The employer sizzled when an employee scammed and took all the company’s money.” The word “sizzle” was used in the sentence to indicate that the employer seethed with deep anger and resentment when an employee scammed and took all the company’s money.

Skip

Skip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of skip are “to move or proceed with leaps and bounds or with a skip,” “to bound off one point after another or ricochet,” “to leave quickly or secretly,” “to pass over or omit an internal, item, or step,” or “to pass over without notice or mention or omit.” For example, “It is not good to skip a class.” The word “skip” was used in the sentence to show that it is not good to leave a class secretly. Another example is, “The experiment failed because they skipped an important step.” The word “skip” was used in the sentence to indicate that the experiment failed because they omitted an important step.

Skulk

Skulk is an intransitive verb. The definitions of skulk are “to move stealthily or furtively” or “to hide or conceal something, often out of cowardice or fear or with sinister intent.” For example, “The man skulk in the crowd after a policeman recognized him as a shoplifter.” The word “skulk” was used in the sentence to imply that the man hid or concealed in the crowd after a policeman recognized him as a shoplifter. Another example is, “The little kid skulk under the table before her mother notice that the vase is broken.” The word “skulk” was used in the sentence to show that the little kid moves stealthily or furtively under the table before the mother notices that the vase is broken.

Slash

Slash is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slash are “to lash out, cut, or thrash about with or as if with an edged blade,” “to cut with or as if with rough sweeping strokes,” “cane or lash,” “to cut slits to reveal a color beneath,” “to criticize cuttingly,” or “to reduce sharply, or cut.” For example, “The vendor slashes the meat into small pieces.” The word “slash” was used in the sentence to indicate that the vendor cut an edged meat blade into small pieces. Another example is, “They slash the number of employees by 30%.” The word “slash” was used in the sentence to indicate that they reduce the number of employees by 30%.

Slide

Slide is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slide are “to move smoothly along a surface or slip,” “to slip or fall by loss of footing,” “to change position or become dislocated or shift,” “to slither along the ground or crawl,” “to hand, pass along, or slip easily or quietly,” “to stream along or flow,” “to pass unnoticed or unremarked,” or “to pass unobtrusively or steal.” For example, “The old woman slides on the slippery floor.” The word “slide” was used in the sentence to imply that the old woman slipped or fell on the slippery floor. Another example is, “Many boys slide a message to an attractive girl through direct message on Instagram.” The word “slide” was used in the sentence to imply that many boys quietly slip a message to an attractive girl through direct messages on Instagram.

Slink

Slink is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slink are “to go or move quietly or privately or steal,” “to move in a sinuous provocative manner,” or “to give premature birth.” For example, “The girl always slinks after class to go home and to be free from her stalker.” The word “slink” was used in the sentence to indicate that the girl moves stealthily or furtively after class to go home and to be free from the stalker. Another example is “The dancers slinks on the stage.” The word “slink” was used in the sentence to indicate that the dancers move in a sinuous, provocative manner on the stage.

Slip

Slip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of slip are “to move with a smooth sliding motion,” “to move quietly and cautiously or steal,” “elapse or pass,” “to escape from memory or consciousness,” “to become uttered through inadvertence,” “to fall into error or fault or lapse,” “to slide out of place or away from a support or one’s grasp,” “to get speedily into or out of clothing,” “to fall off from a standard or accustomed level by degrees or decline,” or “to get away from.” For example, “The customer slip the money to the tip box.” The word “slip” was used in the sentence to imply that the customer moved with a smooth sliding motion money to the tip box. Another example is, “The student didn’t notice that the documents slipped from the folder.” The word “slip” was used in the sentence to imply that the student didn’t notice that the documents fell from the folder. 

Slump

Slump is an intransitive verb. The definitions of slump are “to fall or sink suddenly,” “to drop or slide down suddenly or collapse,” “to assume a drooping posture or carriage or slouch,” or “to go into a slump.” For example, “They already know that their career will slump.” The word “slump” was used in the sentence to indicate that they already know that their career is going to fall or sink. Another example is, “The girl immediately slumps when the teacher leaves.” The word “slump” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl immediately assumes a dropping posture or slouch when the teacher leaves. 

Slurp

Slurp is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definition of slurp is “to make a sipping sound while eating or drinking.” For example, “A 2-year-old slurps the milk.” The word “slurp” was used in the sentence to indicate that a 2-year-old makes a sipping noise while drinking the milk. Another example is, “The consequence of the challenge is to slurp 10ml soy sauce.” The word “slurp” was used in the sentence to imply that the consequence of the challenge is to make a sipping noise while drinking the 10ml soy sauce.

Smash

Smash is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of smash are “to break or crush by violence,” “to drive or throw violently, especially with a shattering or battering effect,” “batter,” “to destroy utterly or wreck,” or “to move or become propelled with violence or crashing effect.” For example, “The man smashed his bag when he heard the bad news.” The word “smash” was used in the sentence to show that the man broke or crushed the bag with violence when he heard about the bad news. Another example is, “They watch as the wrecking ball smashes their old house.” The word “smash” was used in the sentence to indicate that they watch as the wrecking ball destroys utterly or wrecks their old house. 

Smite

Smite is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of smite are “to hit harshly or strongly, mainly with the palm or hold in the palm,” “to murder or badly injure by smiting,” “to cause to beat,” “to affect as if by striking,” “capture or seize,” or “to deliver or deal a blow with or as if with the hand or something held.” For example, “An unknown person smite all the money in the cash register.” The word “smite” was used in the sentence to imply that an unknown person took all the money in the cash register. Another example is “The man accidentally smites the deer in the forest.” The word “smite” was used in the sentence to imply that the man accidentally killed or injured the deer in the forest. 

Snag

Snag is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of snag are “a concealed or unexpected difficulty or obstacle,” “an irregularity that suggests the result of tearing,” “a rough sharp or jagged projecting part or protuberance,” and “to catch, capture, or get by quick action,” or “a standing dead tree.” For example, “The girl’s pants snagged during the workout.” The word “snag” was used in the sentence that the girl’s pants tore during the workout. Another example is, “The cat snagged two mice.” The word “snag” was used in the sentence to imply that the cat caught or captured two mice. 

Snarl

Snarl is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of snarl are “to cause to become knotted or intertwined or tangle,” “say something in an angry, bad-tempered voice,” “make an aggressive growl with bared teeth,” “to make excessively complicated,” or “to become snarled.” For example, “The neighbor’s dog always snarls at strangers.” The word “snarl” was used in the sentence to imply that the dog was aggressive with bared teeth at strangers. Another example is, “The people outside the municipal hall snarl for the bad governance.” The word “snarl” was used in the sentence to indicate that the people outside the municipal hall say something in an angry, bad-tempered voice for the bad governance.

Sneak

Sneak is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sneak are “to go stealthily or furtively or slink,” “to act in or as if in a furtive manner,” “to carry the football on a quarterback sneak,” or “to put, bring, or take furtively or artfully.” For example, “The student sneaked inside the room and made sure the professor didn’t notice.” The word “sneak” was used in the sentence to imply that the student acted furtively inside the room and ensured that the professor didn’t notice. Another example is, “They sneak alcoholic drinks inside the cinema.” The word “sneak” was used in the sentence to imply that they brought alcoholic drinks inside the cinema.

Snowball

Snowball is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of snowball are “to increase, accumulate, expand, or multiply at a quickly accelerating rate” or “to attack with snowballs or to throw snowballs at.” For example, “The price of goods nowadays snowballs.” The word “snowball” was used in the sentence to indicate that the price of goods nowadays quickly increases. Another example is, “The family snowballs at each other every winter.” The word “snowball” was used in the sentence to imply that the family attacked or threw snowballs at each other every winter. 

Soar

Soar is an intransitive verb. The definitions of soar are “to fly above or about,” “to float or hang in the air often at a great height or glide,” “to rise or increase dramatically,” “to ascend to a higher or more exalted level,” or “to rise to majestic stature.” For example, “The view from a rooftop is airplanes that soar from the airport.” The word “soar” was used in the sentence to show that the view from a rooftop is airplanes that fly aloft from the airport. Another example is, “The body temperature suddenly soars.” The word “soar” was used in the sentence to imply that the body temperature suddenly rises or increases dramatically. 

Spam

Spam is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of spam are “to send someone an advertisement by email that they do not want” or “to send or post spam to.” For example, “Their job is to spam messages to various people in the email list.” The word “spam” was used in the sentence to imply that their job is to send someone an advertisement by email to various people in the email list. Another example is, “The company keeps spamming, and people are annoyed.” The word “spam” was used in the sentence to imply that the company keeps sending advertisements, and people are annoyed. 

Sparkle

Sparkle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sparkle are “to discard sparks,” “to radiate or reflect bright moving points of lights,” “to perform brilliantly,” “effervesce,” “to become lively or animated,” or “to cause to glitter or shine.” For example, “The ballerinas sparkle wearing the dress full of sequins.” The word “sparkle” was used in the sentence to show that the ballerinas give off or reflect bright moving points of lights wearing the dress full of sequins. Another example is, “The gold-roofed temple sparkle every morning.” The word “sparkle” was used in the sentence to imply that the gold-roofed temple glitter or shines every morning.

Sport

Sport is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sport are “to amuse oneself or frolic,” “to engage in a sport,” “to mock or ridicule something,” “to speak or act in jest or trifle,” “mutate,” “to display or wear something proudly,” or “to put forth as a sport or bud variation.” For example, “The candidate sports the national costume during the coronation night.” The word “sport” was used in the sentence to indicate that the candidate displayed or proudly wore the national costume during the coronation night. Another example is “The kid sports the basketball.” The word “sport” was used in the sentence to imply that the kid engaged in a sport, which is basketball. 

Sprinkle

Sprinkle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of sprinkle are “to scatter in drops or particles,” “to scatter over,” “to scatter at intervals in,” “to wet lightly,” or “to rain lightly in scattered drops.” For example, “The baker sprinkles the toppings on the cake.” The word “sprinkle” was used in the sentence to imply that the baker scattered over the toppings on the top of the cake. Another example is “The rain sprinkle for one straight week.” The word “sprinkle” was used in the sentence to imply that the rain scattered at intervals for one straight week. 

Stare

Stare is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stare are “to look fixedly often with wide-open eyes,” “to show oneself prominently,” “to stand on end or bristle,” “to have an effect on by staring,” or “to look at with a searching or earnest gaze.” For example, “The dog continued staring at the door, waiting for the arrival of its owner.” The word “stare” was in a present particle form and used in the sentence to indicate that the dog continued to look at the door with a searching or earnest gaze, waiting for the arrival of its owner. Another example is, “It is rude to stare at someone from head to toe.” The word “stare” was used in the sentence to imply that it is rude to look fixedly at someone from head to toe. 

Starve

Starve is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of starve are “to perish from the food shortage,” “to die of freeze,” “to experience or perish from deprivation,” or “to kill with hunger.” For example, “Millions of people are starving due to poverty.” The word “starve” in the sentence is in the present participle and used to imply that millions of people are perishing from lack of food due to poverty. Another example is, “The syndicate makes the kids starve and let them work along the street.” The word “starve” was used in the sentence to indicate that the syndicate killed the kids with hunger and let them work along the street.

Steal

Steal is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of steal are “to get something unlawfully and especially as a routine or normal habit,” “to come or go furtively, quietly or surprisingly,” “to carry out by force or unjust means,” “to move, transmit, or present secretly or smuggle,” or “to capture, obtain, or win by trickery, skill, or daring,” or “to make it to the base securely only by running and usually catching the opposing team off guard.” For example, “Some people steal to make some money.” The word “steal” was used in the sentence to indicate that some people take something from another wrongfully to make money. Another example is, “Four men are accused of stealing a car from a businessman.” The word “steal” was used in the sentence to imply that four men are accused of taking away a car by force from a businessman. 

Steer

Steer is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of steer are “to control the course or direct,” “to set and hold to a course,” “to direct the course of a ship or automobile,” “to pursue a course of action,” or “to be subject to steering.” For example, “The one who steers the direction of our own life.” The word “steer” was used in the sentence to imply that the one who controls the direction of life is ourselves. Another example is, “The driver steers the wheels to the closest resort.” The word “steer” was used in the sentence to imply that the driver directs the course of the wheels of an automobile going to the closest resort. 

Storm

Storm is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the storm are “to blow with violence,” “to rain, hail, snow, or sleet vigorously,” “to attack by storm,” “to be in or to exhibit a violent passion or rage,” “to rush about or move impetuously, violently, or angrily.” For example, “The father storms to his daughter’s room to check her condition.” The word “storm” was used in the sentence that the father rushes impetuously to check the daughter’s condition. Another example is “An armed man storm the bank.” The word “storm” was used in the sentence to imply that an armed man blows the bank with violence. 

Strain

Strain is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of strain are “to tighten or cause fitting strongly,” “to spread to maximum extension and tautness,” “to exert to the utmost,” “to injure by overuse, misuse, or excessive pressure,” or “to cause a change of form or size in a body by application of external force.” For example, “The basketball player accidentally strains his foot from playing.” The word “strain” was used in the sentence that the basketball player accidentally injured his foot from excessive pressure from playing. Other definitions of “strain” are “to separate the liquid part from the solid parts,” “hug,” “constrict,” “to stretch beyond the proper limit,” “to cause to pass through a strainer or filter,” “to make violent efforts or strive,” or to make great difficulty or resistance or balk.” For example, “The next step is to strain the water from the pasta.” The word “strain” was used in the sentence to imply that the next step is to separate the water from the pasta.

Stretch

Stretch is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stretch are “to extend one’s limbs, one’s body, etc. in a reclining position,” “to reach out or extend,” “to extend in length,” “to amplify beyond natural or proper limits,” “to fell with or as if with blow.” For example, “It is helpful to stretch every day to improve blood circulation and posture.” The word “stretch” was used in the sentence to imply that it is helpful to extend one’s limbs or one’s body to improve blood circulation and posture. Other definitions of “stretch” are “to cause the limbs of a person to be pulled especially in torture,” “to pull taut,” “to enlarge or distend especially by force,” “to cause to reach or continue,” “to extend in length,” or “spread.” For example, “The management wants to stretch the budget to expand their brand.” The word “stretch” was used in the sentence to indicate that the management wants to extend the budget length to expand their brand. 

Strip

Strip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of the strip are “to remove clothing, covering, or surface matter from,” “to take away someone’s property, rights or titles,” “to divest of honors, privileges, or functions,” or “to remove extraneous or superficial matter from.” For example, “They are planning to strip their hard-earned property from the government.” The word “strip” was used in the sentence to show that they are planning to take away their hard-earned property from the government. Other definitions of “strip” are “to make bare or clear,” “to finish a milking of by pressing the last available milk from the teats,” “to remove cured leaves from the stalks of tobacco,” “to tear or damage the thread,” “to separate from a mixture or solution,” or “to remove using a surgical instrument.” For example, “The doctor is scheduled to strip the gallstones from the patient in the afternoon.” The word “strip” was used in the sentence to imply that the doctor was scheduled to remove the gallstones from the patient in the afternoon.

Stroll

Stroll is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stroll are “to go from place to place in search of work or profit,” “to walk in a leisurely or idle manner or ramble,” or “to walk at leisure along or about.” For example, “Their hobby is to stroll every night after work.” The word “stroll” was used in the sentence to indicate that their hobby is to walk leisurely along every night after work. Another example is, “The property specialist stroll around the city to look for a possible client.” The word “stroll” was used in the sentence to show that the property specialist goes from place to place in search of a possible client. 

Struggle

Struggle is an intransitive verb. The definitions of struggle are “to make difficult or intense efforts in the face of challenges or opposition,” “to use a lot of effort to defeat someone, prevent something, or achieve something, “or “to proceed with difficulty or with great effort.” For example, “People struggle before they are able to get what they want?” The word “struggle” was used in the sentence to indicate that people proceed with difficulty or with great effort before they are able to get what they want. Another example is “The girl struggles to escape from the abduction.” The word “struggle” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl used a lot of effort to prevent abduction.

Stumble

Stumble is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of stumble are “to fall into sin or waywardness,” “to make an error or blunder,” “to come to an obstacle to belief,” “to walk unsteadily or clumsily,” “to speak or act in a hesitant or faltering manner,” “to come unexpectedly or by chance,” “to cause to stumble or trip,” or “bewilder or confound.” For example, “The man was caught in the act and stumbled when someone saw him stealing.” The word “stumble” was used in the sentence to indicate that the man spoke or acted hesitant when someone caught the man stealing. Another example is, “The girl stumbled when she discovered the truth.” The word “stumble” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl was bewildered or confounded when she discovered the truth.

Supercharge

Supercharge is a transitive verb. The definitions of supercharge are “to charge greatly or excessively as with vigor or tension,” “to make an engine more powerful by forcing in more air and fuel than usual,” “boost,” or “pressurize.” For example, “The students are supercharged with nervousness when the teacher announced that there is a graded recitation.” The word “supercharge” was used in the sentence to imply that the students were significantly charged or excessively with nervousness when the teacher announced that there was a graded recitation. Another example is, “A telecommunication company supercharged the plan for the benefit of the subscribers.” The word “supercharge” was used in the sentence to imply that the telecommunication company boosted the plan for the benefit of the subscribers.

Supersize

Supersize is a transitive verb. The definitions of supersize are “to greatly increase the size of something or someone” or “to make something or someone supersized.” For example, “The fast food restaurant supersize most of their meals.” The word “supersize” was used in the sentence to indicate that fast food restaurants significantly increase the size of most of their meals. Another example is, “The organizer supersized the event by decorating the place elegantly and inviting the big personalities.” The word “supersize” was used in the sentence that the organizer made the event excessively large by decorating the place elegantly and inviting the big personalities.

Surge

Surge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of surge are “to up and down actively or toss,” “to lift and move in waves or billows or increase,” “to slip around a windlass, capstan, or bitts,” to rise suddenly to an excessive or abnormal value,” “to move with a surge or in surges,” or “to let go or slacken gradually.” For example, “The crowd surged when a celebrity arrived” The word “surge” was used in the sentence to indicate that the crowd rose suddenly to an excessive number when a celebrity arrived. Another example is, “They are scared because the boat is surging, and the rain is heavy.” The word “surge” was used in the sentence to indicate that they are scared because the boat is rising and falling or tossing, and the rain is heavy. 

Survey

Survey is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of survey are “to examine as to condition, situation or value or appraise,” “to query someone in order to collect data for the analysis of some aspect of a group or area,” “to determine the form, extent, and position by taking linear and angular measurements and by applying the principles of geometry and trigonometry,” “to ask people questions to find out about their opinions or behavior,” or “inspect or scrutinize.” For example, “The students survey employees working on the Business Process Outsourcing for their thesis.” The word “survey” was used in the sentence to indicate that the students query employees working on the Business Process Outsourcing to collect data for their thesis. Another example, “The company surveys the customer to know if there is something they need to modify about the brand.” The word “survey” was used in the sentence to indicate that the company ask the customer questions to know if there is something they need to modify about the brand.

Swell

Swell is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of swell are “to expand gradually beyond a normal or original limit,” “to become distended or puffed up,” “to form a bulge or rounded elevation,” ‘to become filled with pride and arrogance,” “to become distended with emotion,” or “to affect with a powerful or expansive emotion.” For example, “The old woman’s legs swelled up, and they need to go to the hospital for a check-up.” The word “swell” was used in the sentence to imply that the old woman’s legs became distended or puffed up, and they need to go to the hospital for a check-up. Another example is “The positive cases of Covid-19 virus continuously swell.” The word “swell” was used in the sentence to indicate that the positive cases of the Covid-19 virus expand gradually.

Swipe

Swipe is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of swipe are “to strike or move with a sweeping motion,” “to operate something by sliding one’s finger while pressing against a touch screen,” “to strike or wipe with a sweeping motion,” “to activate or control with a swiping gesture,” “steal or pilfer,” or “to slide through as slot in a reading device so that information contained in the strip or code are able to processed.” For example, “The woman swipe the credit card to pay for all the clothes and shoes.” The word “swipe” was used in the sentence to indicate that the woman move the credit card through as slot in a reading device so that information contained in the strip or code are able to processed to pay for all the clothes and shoes. Another example, “The man swipe the blood coming from his forehead.” The word “swipe” was used in the sentence that the man wipe the blood coming from his forehead with a sweeping motion. 

Swoon

Swoon is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of swoon are “to move with a sweep,” “to faint or be unconscious,” “to feel a lot of pressure, love, etc. because of something or someone,” or “to gain or carry off in or as if in a swoop.” For example, “The debutant swooned with mix emotions for being in a legal age.” The word “swoon” was used in the sentence to indicate that the debutant feels mixed emotions about being of legal age. Another example is, “The vendor swoon due to tiredness.” The word “swoon” was used in the sentence to indicate that the vendor fainted due to tiredness. 

Tail

Tail is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of tail are “to follow for purposes of surveillance,” “to connect end to end,” “to make or furnish with a tail,” “to secretly follow and watch someone,” and “to form or move in a straggling line,” “to grow progressively smaller, fainter, or more scattered or abate,” or “to swing or lie with the stern in a named direction.” For example, “The obsessed man tail the girl every day.” The word “tail” was used in the sentence to indicate that the obsessed man secretly follows and watches the girl every day. Another example is, “The business is tailing off, which is a good sign.” The word “tail” was used in the sentence to imply that the business is growing progressively smaller, and it is a good sign. 

Tattle

Tattle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of tattle are “to tell secrets about what someone else has done or blab,” “chatter or prate,” or “to utter or disclose in gossip or chatter.” For example, “Don’t tattle the things without evidence.” The word “tattle” was used in the sentence to imply that don’t utter or disclose things without evidence. Another example is, “The kid tattle everything to the teacher about the wrongdoings of the other kid.” The word “tattle” was used in the sentence to indicate that the kid told secrets to the teacher about the wrongdoings of the other kids. 

Toddle

Toddle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of toddle are “to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child” or “to take a stroll or saunter.” For example, “The parents are happy when their 1-year-old kid toddle exactly on the first birthday.” The word “toddle” was used in the sentence to imply that the parents are happy when their 1-year-old kid starts to walk with short tottering steps, precisely on the first birthday. Another example is, “It is nearly 4 hours since they start to toddle around the mall.” The word “toddle” was used in the sentence to indicate that it is nearly 4 hours since they started to take a stroll or saunter around the mall. 

Transfigure

Transfigure is a transitive verb. The definitions of transfigure are “to deliver a new and usually exalted or spiritual form or change externally and mostly for the better” or “to change into something great or beautiful.” For example, “Jesus was transfigured, his face and clothes becoming stunningly radiant.” The word “transfigured” was used in the sentence to indicate that the spiritual appearance of Jesus transformed, and the face and clothes became stunningly radiant. Another example is “The girl transfigured after finishing the toxic relationship.” The word “transfigure” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl changes into something terrific or beautiful after finishing the toxic relationship.

Transform

Transform is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of transform are “to change in composition or structure,” “to change the outward form or appearance of,” “to change in character or condition or convert,” “to subject to mathematical transformation,” “to cause a cell to undergo a genetic transformation,” or “to become transformed or change.” For example, “The old grocery store was transformed into a small clinic.” The word “transform” was used in the sentence to indicate that the old grocery store changed its structure to a small clinic. . Another example is, “The students transform an equation written in slope-intercept form to standard form.” The word “transform” was used in the sentence to indicate that the teacher taught the students how to do the mathematical transformation of an equation written in slope-intercept form to standard form.

Travel

Travel is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of travel are “to go on or as if on a trip or tour or journey,” “pass,” “associate,” “to go place to place,” and “to move in a given direction or path or through a given distance,” “to move quickly,” “to take more steps while holding a basketball than the rules allow,” “to traverse,” or “to cover an area as a commercial traveler.” For example, “The husband traveled for 10 minutes to get to the hospital for his pregnant wife.” The word “travel” was used in the sentence to show that the husband moved quickly for 10 minutes to get to the hospital for his pregnant wife. Another example is, “The sunlight travels for 8 minutes and 20 seconds from the Sun to the Earth.” The word “travel” was used in the sentence to imply that it takes 8 minutes and 20 seconds for the sunlight to move from the Sun to the Earth.

Treat

Treat is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of treat are “to handle with in speech or writing or explain,” “to submit or represent artistically,” “to deal with or handle,” “to bear oneself toward or use,” “to regard and deal with in a specified manner,” “to provide with free food, drink, or entertainment,” “to use drugs, exercises, etc., to cure a person of a disease or heal an injury,” “to provide another’s expenses,” “to discuss or negotiate.” For example, “They treat the maid as a part of the family.” The word “treat” was used in the sentence to imply that they regard and deal with the maid as a part of the family. Another example is, “Immediately treat the wound, especially for those with diabetes.” The word “treat” was used in the sentence to imply that it is essential to cure a wound, especially for those with diabetes, immediately. 

Trim

Trim is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of trim are “to remove by or as if by cutting,” “to make trim and neat, especially by cutting or clipping,” “to reduce the amount or size of something,” and “to embellish with or as if with ribbons, lace, or ornaments,” “to administer a beating to or thrash,” “defeat,” or “to cause to assume a desirable position in the water by the arrangement of ballast, cargo, or passengers.” For example, “They are trying to trim the cost of renovating the house.” The word “trim” was used in the sentence to show that they are trying to reduce the cost of renovating the house. Another example is, “The gardener trims the excess of the bonsai every month.” The word “trim” was used in the sentence to indicate that the gardener reduces the excess of the bonsai every month.

Trip

Trip is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of trip are “to catch the foot against something to stumble,” “to make an error or false step,” “to dance, skip, or caper with light, quick steps,” “to scramble in pronunciation when speaking,” “to make a journey,” “to activate a mechanism,” “to get high on a psychedelic drug,” “to release or operate,” “to raise an anchor from the bottom,” “to pull a yard into a perpendicular position for lowering,” or “to hoist a topmast far enough to enable the fid to be withdrawn preparatory to housing or lowering.” For example, “Most passerby trip due to the uneven ground.” The word “trip” was used in the sentence to imply that most passersby made a mistake or false step due to uneven ground. Another example is, “The kid trip the words when telling a lie.” The word “trip” was used in the sentence to imply that the kid scrambled the articulation of the words when telling a lie.

Trudge

Trudge is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of trudge are “to walk or march steadily and usually laboriously,” “to walk slowly with heavy steps especially because of tiredness or unhappy,” or “to trudge along or over.” For example, “The applicant trudged down the building when the interviewer said there is no available position.” The word “trudge” was used in the sentence to indicate that the applicant walked slowly with heavy steps down the building when the interviewer said that there was no available position. Another example is, “They trudge on the river to get to the other side of the barrio.” The word “trudge” was used in the sentence to show that they walk steadily on the river to get to the other side of the barrio.

Tussle

Tussle is an intransitive verb. The definitions of tussle are “to have hard conflict or strong debate,” “to fight with another person using arms or body,” or “to struggle roughly or scuffle.” For example, “All of them are tussling over the property.” The word “tussle” was used in the sentence to indicate that they all have strong arguments over the property. Another example is, “The boy always tussles at school.” The word “tussle” was used in the sentence to imply that the boy always fights with another person using his arms or body at school.

Uncover

Uncover is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of uncover are “to make known, bring to light, disclose or reveal,” “to expose to view by removing some covering,” “to take the cover from,” “to remove the hat from,” or “to deprive of protection.” For example, “Their goal is to uncover the truth behind their lost daughter.” The word “uncover” was used in the sentence to imply that their goal is to disclose and reveal the truth behind their lost daughter. Another example is, “They uncover the newly-built monument and show it to the public.” The word “uncover” was used in the sentence to indicate that they took the cover of the newly-built monument and showed it to the public.

Unearth

Unearth is a transitive verb. The definitions of unearth are “to dig up out of as if out of the earth or exhume” or “to make known or public or bring to light.” For example, “The remains of the earthquake victims were unearthed two days after the incident.” The word “unearth” was used in the sentence to imply that the remains of the victims of the earthquake were dug up two days after the incident happened. Another example is, “They unearth the evidence to prove that the man is guilty.” The word “unearth” was used in the sentence to indicate that they make known or public the evidence to prove that the man is guilty. 

Untangle

Untangle is a transitive verb. The definitions of untangle are “to make a complicated subject or problem, or its different parts, clear and able to be understood” or “to loose from tangles or entanglement or straighten out.” For example, “The student is smart and able to untangle the most difficult lesson.” The word “untangle” was used in the sentence to show that the student is intelligent and able to make the most challenging lesson clear and able to be understood. Another example is, “The hair spray makes the hair hard to untangle.” The word “untangle” was used in the sentence to indicate that the hair spray makes the hair hard to straighten out.

Unveil

Unveil is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of unveil are “to remove a veil or to cover from,” “to make public, expose or reveal,” or “to throw off a veil or protective cloak.” For example, “It is time to unveil all the wrongdoings of the government.” The word “unveil” was used in the sentence to imply that it is time to expose or publicly reveal the government’s wrongdoings. Another example is, “They finally unveil the new furniture for the new-built house.” The word “unveil” was used in the sentence to indicate that they finally removed the covering from the new furniture for the new-built house.

Usher

Usher is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of usher are “to conduct to a place,” ‘to precede as an usher, forerunner, or harbinger,” “to show someone where they should go, often by going with them,” “to serve as an usher,” or “to cause to enter or introduce.” For example, “The tour guide ushers the foreigners to the historical place of Indonesia.” The word “usher” was used in the sentence to indicate that the tour guide shows the foreigners or goes with them to the historical place of Indonesia. Another example is, “50 people usher at famous singer’s concert.” The word “usher” was used in the sentence to imply that 50 people serve as an usher at a famous singer’s concert.

Veil

Veil is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of veil are “to cover, provide, obscure, or conceal with or as if with a veil” or “to put on or wear a veil.” For example, “The girl veil all her sins to her family.” The word “veil” was used in the sentence to show that the girl conceals all the sins of her family. Another example is, “Makeups are not able to veil bad attitude.” The word “veil” was used in the sentence to indicate that makeups are not able to cover lousy attitudes.

Wail

Wail is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wail are “to express sorrow audibly or lament,” “to make a sound suggestive of a mournful cry,” “to express dissatisfaction plaintively or complain,” or “bewail.” For example, “The woman wails seeing her husband in a coffin.” The word “wail” was used in the sentence to imply that the women make a sound or mournfully cries, seeing her husband in a coffin. Another example is “The client wail about the delayed project.” The word “wail” was used in the sentence to imply that the client expressed dissatisfaction or complaints about the delayed project.

Weave

Weave is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of weave are “to create cloth by interlacing strings as of yarn,” “to create by intertwining,” “spin,” “to generate by elaborately joining elements or formulate,” “to unite in a coherent whole,” “to introduce as an appropriate element,” or “to direct in a winding or zigzag course especially to avoid obstacles.” For example, “The girl weaves a scarf for her grandmother.” The word “weave” was used in the sentence to imply that the girl formed a scarf by interlacing yarns for her grandmother. Another example is, “The car weave on the streets to avoid traffic on the highway.” The word “weave” was used in the sentence to indicate that the car direct in a zigzag course on the streets to avoid traffic on the highway.

Wind

Wind is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wind are “to turn completely or repeatedly about an object: coil or twine,” “to encircle or cover with something pliable,” “to raise to a high level, to tighten the spring of,” “to hoist or haul using rope or chain and a windlass,” “to traverse on a curving course,” “entangle or involve,” or “bend or warp.” For example, “The rocky road winds upward toward the sea of clouds at the top of the mountain.” The word “wind” was used in the sentence to indicate that the rock road traverses a curving course toward the sea of clouds at the top of the mountain. Another example is “The scent of the man wind inside the room.” The word “wind” was used in the sentence to imply the scent of the man entangled inside the room.

Withdraw

Withdraw is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of withdraw are “to retrieve or gone or eliminate,” “to take out money from a place of deposit,” “to divert from an object of attention,” “to draw back or aside,” to remove from consideration or set outside a group,” take back or retract,” “retire,” “to remove oneself from participation,” or “to become a motion socially under parliamentary procedure.” For example, “The former governor withdraw the candidacy for Presidency.” The word “withdraw” was used in the sentence to show that the former governor took back the candidacy for the presidency. Another example is, “They need to withdraw to pay all the bills.” The word “withdraw” was used in the sentence to indicate that they need to remove money from a place of deposit to pay all the bills.

Wreck

Wreck is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wreck are “to cast ashore,” “to reduce to a ruinous state by violence,” “shipwreck,” “to ruin, damage, or imperil by a wreck,” “bring about or wreak,” or “to rob, salvage, or repair wreckage or a wreck.” For example, “The pandemic wreck all the plans and dreams of most people.” The word “wreck” was used in the sentence to show that the pandemic ruined all the plans and dreams of most people. Another example is, “The truck was wrecked after it bumped into another vehicle.” The word “wreck” was used in the sentence to indicate that the truck was damaged after it bumped into another vehicle.

Wrench

Wrench is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wrench are “to pull and twist something suddenly or violently away from a fixed position,” “to make somebody feel great pain or unhappiness, especially so that they make a sound or cry,” “to pull or strain at something with violent twisting,” “change,” “distort or pervert,” or “to snatch forcibly or wrest.” For example, “The soccer player accidentally wrenches his ankle during the game.” The word “wrench” was used in the sentence to indicate that the soccer player accidentally pulled or strained his ankle with violent twisting during the game. Another example is, “A strange man tried to wrench the bag from an old woman, but he failed.” The word “wrench” was used in the sentence to indicate that a strange man tried to pull and twist the bag violently away from a fixed position from the old woman. 

Wrest

Wrest is a transitive verb. The definitions of wrest are “to pull, force or move by violent wringing or twisting movements” or “gain with difficulty by or as if by force, violence, or determined labor.” For example, “The activist wrest to gain freedom from the oppressors.” The word “wrest” was used in the sentence to indicate that the activists gained freedom with difficulty by violence from the oppressors. Another example is, “They wrest the fruit from the stem to get it.” The word “wrest” was used in the sentence to show that they pulled or forced the fruit from the stem by twisting movements to get it.

Wrestle

Wrestle is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wrestle are “to fight by struggling with and striving to trip or throw an opponent down or off balance,” “to battle an opposing tendency or force,” “to engage in deep thought, consideration, or debate,” “to engage in a violent or determined struggle,” or “to move maneuver, or force with difficulty.” For example, “The kid wrestle through a martial arts class.” The word “wrestle” was used to mean that the kid contend by grappling with and striving to trip or throw an opponent down or off-balance through martial arts class. Another example is, “The debate is a formal discussion of two sides, in which they wrestle and oppose each other’s arguments.” The word “wrestle” was used in the sentence to show that the debate is a formal discussion of two sides in which they engage in deep thought, consideration, or debate and oppose each other’s arguments.

Wring

Wring is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of wring are “to compress or twist mainly to make dry or to remove moisture or liquid,” “to extract or obtain by twisting and compressing,” “to twist to strain or sprain into a distorted shape,” “to twist together as a sign of anguish,” “torment,” or “squirm or writhe.” For example, “Next, wring the coconut meat to get its nutrients.” The word “wring” was used in the sentence to imply that the next step is to twist or compress the coconut meat to extract or obtain its nutrients. Another example is, “The maid wring all the clothes before she hangs them outside.” The word “wring” was used in the sentence to indicate that the maid squeeze or twists all the clothes to make them dry or to extract moisture or liquid before she hangs them outside.

Yank

Yank is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of yank are “to pull or extract with a quick, vigorous movement” or “to remove abruptly.” For example, “The man immediately yanks the coins out of his wallet to give it to the beggar.” The word “yank” was used in the sentence to imply that the man immediately pulled the coins with a quick movement out of his wallet to give them to the beggar. Another example is, “The woman yanks all her destructive thoughts and tries to focus on work.” The word “yank” was used in the sentence to imply that the woman abruptly removes all her destructive thoughts and tries to focus on work.

Zing

Zing is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of zing are “to make or move with a humming sound,” “zip or speed,” “to hit suddenly or zap,” or “to criticize in a pointed or witty manner.” For example, “The motorcycle zinged down the road.” The word “zing” was used in the sentence to indicate that the motorcycle makes or moves with a humming sound down the road. Another example is, “They zing all the flies and mosquitoes.” The word “zing” was used in the sentence to imply that they hit or zap all the flies and mosquitoes.

Zap

Zap is a transitive and intransitive verb. The definitions of zap are “to get rid of, or kill with sudden force,” “to propel suddenly or speedily,” “to use the remote control to change television channels quickly,” “to hit with a sudden concentrated application of force or energy,” “to irradiate especially with microwaves.” For example, “They have witnessed a bird zapped by an eagle.” The word “zap” was used in the sentence to indicate that they have witnessed a bird get killed by an eagle. Another example, “The old man zapped from news to a movie.” The word “zap” was used in the sentence to indicate that the old man used the remote control to change television channels from news to a movie quickly. 

What are the different types of Verb?

Listed below are the different types of verb.

  • Action verbs: Action Verbs pertain to actions. It describes activities executed by a person, animal, process, or object. Action verbs or dynamic verbs explain what the sentence’s subject is doing or has done. It is able to be physical or mental actions. It is possible to use more than one action verb in a sentence. Examples of action verbs are throw, eat, dance, kick, talk, cry, send, or ask. 
  • Stative verbs: Stative verbs pertain to conditions or states of being. It describes things such as qualities, opinions, beliefs, states of existence, or emotions. Stative verbs are how something is, appears, or feels. It describes an emotional, mental or physical state of being. There are four types of stative verbs, including emotion, senses, being, or possession. Stative verbs do not show physical action or process. Examples of stative verbs are like, prefer, understand, love, believe, be, have, or seem. 
  • Transitive verbs: A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object, such as a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase, to receive the action of the verb. For example, “The kid kicks the ball.” The verb is kicks. The object receiving the verb’s action is the ball. However, transitive verbs have indirect objects, which name the object to whom or for whom the act was done. For example, “Linda lend the phone to Nadya.” The verb is lend. The direct object is the phone. The indirect object is Nadya.
  • Intransitive verbs: Intransitive Verb is the opposite of Transitive Verb. It does not require an object to act upon. There is no object to receive its action, although intransitive verbs are able to be followed by an adverb or adverbial phrase. Adverbs, adjectives, or prepositional phrases are not able to be used as direct objects. However, action and stative verbs are marble to be used as intransitive verbs. For example, “The girl sang,” “They are eating,” or “The kid left.”
  • Linking verbs: Linking Verbs are verbs that don’t show action but describe the subject, such as what it is or how it looks. It links a subject with an adjective or noun that describes or identifies the subject. Linking verbs connect either to a state of being, such as be, become, seem, resin, appear, or to the senses, such as look, hear, feel, taste or smell. There are words that are always linking verbs, such as to be, to become, and to seem. Some linking verbs are is, are, can be, was being, might be, indicate, had been, must, may be, have, had become, or am. For example, “Apple is my favorite fruit,” “The players seem tired,” or “The food tastes good.”
  • Helping verbs: Helping verbs or auxiliary verbs are used in construction with certain forms of the verb, such as infinitives or particles, to help express the main verb’s voice, tense, or mood. Helping verbs are placed in front of the main verb of the sentence. Some examples of helping verbs are can, is, was, will, have, has, had, must, do, will be, will have, and are. Examples of helping verbs expressing tense are “The boy is dancing on the stage,” “The boy was dancing for 30 minutes,” and “The boy will be dancing later.” The examples show that the helping verb “to be” helps to form the progressive tense, which is the tense used for outgoing actions. Examples of helping verbs expressing voice are “The girl was bitten by a dog,” “The books are often delivered to the store,” and “The mall will be closed at 10 PM.” The examples show that the helping verb “to be” helps to form the passive voice. Examples of helping verbs expressing mood are “Did you drink?” or “Don’t give up.” The helping verb “to do” was used in the first example to form the interrogative mood or to ask a question. Meanwhile, the helping verb “to do” in the second example was used to create an imperative mood or to give an order. Furthermore, a linking verb is different from a helping verb. Linking verbs act as the main verb of a sentence, whereas helping verbs do not act as the main verb.
  • Modal verbs: Modal Verbs are usually used with another verb to express ideas, such as possibility, necessity, and permission. They are helping verbs and are used together with the sentence’s main verb. Modal verbs express certain hypothetical conditions, including advice, capability, or requests. They are used together with the main verb to modify its definition lightly. They are only able to be used on their own if it is clear from the context what the main verb is. Some examples of commonly used modal verbs are might, could, may, can, should, would, must, and will. For example, “She should be at home this time,” “They might notice that something is wrong,” and “The fruit must be ripe.” The examples used the modal verb should and might, which show probability without certainty.
  • Regular verbs: Regular verbs are verbs that follow a common pattern of conjugation, such as simple past tense and past participle. The past tense of a regular verb is formed by adding an “ed” or “d” to the root verb, while the past participle form of the verb is similar to its past form. For example, learn becomes learned, laugh becomes laughed, and the walk becomes walked. Double the final consonant and add “ed” if the one-syllable verb ends with consonant-vowel-consonant. Don’t double the consonant if the verb ends in -w, -x, -y. For example, grab becomes grabbed, stop becomes stopped, play becomes played, and the box becomes boxed. Add a “d” to the end of the root form if the verb ends in “-e.” For example, save becomes saved, live becomes lived, and dance becomes danced. Change “-y” to “-i” and add “-ed” if the verb ends in “-y” For example, cry becomes cried, multiply becomes multiplies, and imply becomes implied. Double the last consonant and add “-ed” if the last syllable of a longer verb is stressed and ends with consonant-vowel-consonant. For example, occur becomes occurred, and prefer becomes preferred. Add “ed” if the first syllable of a longer verb is stressed and the verb ends with consonant-vowel-consonant. For example, operate becomes operated, and open becomes opened. 
  • Irregular verbs: Irregular verbs do not follow the normal patterns for the tense and past participle. It is not formed by adding “-ed” at the end of the verb. For example, the simple past tense of the irregular verb “catch” is “caught.” Similar to the past participles of an irregular verb. The past particle of the irregular verb “break” is “broken.” There are no techniques, general rules, or patterns to determine how to conjugate an irregular verb. The most commonly used irregular verb is “be,” and its forms are: be, am, is, are, was, were, been, and being. Moreover, there are other common irregular verbs, and it has three groups, such as irregular verbs with the exact spelling across all forms, irregular verbs with the same simple past form and past participle form, and irregular verbs with completely different spellings for each form. Examples of irregular verbs with the exact spelling across all forms are hit, cast, thrust, bet, let, shut, and hurt. An example of irregular verbs with the same simple past form and past participle form is “bend,” which has the simple past form and past participle form of “bent,” and the irregular verb “lead,” which has the simple past form and past participle form of “led.” Finally, the example of irregular verbs with completely different spellings for each form is “sing,” with the past form “sang” and past participle “sung.” The irregular verb “fly” with the past form “flew” and past participle “flown.”
  • Phrasal verbs: A phrasal verb is a group of words to describe a specific action. The definition of phrasal verbs usually has nothing to do with the definitions of the component words. A phrasal verb comprises a verb plus a preposition, an adverb, or both. The participle often modifies the meaning of the verb. A phrasal verb is common in English, especially in informal contexts. For example, “They have to check out by 8 PM.” The verb “check” becomes a phrasal verb with the addition of one preposition, “out.” The phrasal verb “check out” means “to pay the bill and leave.” Another example is “Don’t turn on the light.” The verb “turn” becomes a phrasal verb with the addition of one preposition, “on.” The meaning of the phrasal verb “turn on” is “to cause something to start working or to activate.” Moreover, there are two main types of phrasal verbs, such as separable and inseparable. An example of a separable phrasal verb is “They turn the lights on” or “They turn on the lights.” Meanwhile, the example of inseparable phrasal verbs are “The prince turned into a king” and “I need to get up at 5 AM.” Furthermore, phrasal verbs with two participles are inseparable. For example, “They are looking forward to meeting the girl,” and “She needs to get rid of those bad memories.” 
  • Infinitives: An infinitive is a verb that works as a noun, adjective, or adverb to express an opinion, object’s purpose, or action’s purpose or answer the questions of who, what, or why. It commonly starts with the word “to” and is followed by the base form of the verb. Infinitives do not function as verbs; alternatively, they are used as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs. For example, “to create,” “to make,” “to play,” “to write,” “to dance.” or “to fly.” Moreover, the infinitive functions as a noun when used as the subject or direct object in a sentence. For example, “I like to draw.” The verb in the sentence is “like,” and the infinitive is “to draw.” The infinitive functions in the sentence as a noun that expresses an opinion. Infinitives function as adjectives when they change or describe nouns in a sentence. For example, “The kid loves pizza to eat.” The verb in the sentence is “loves,” and the subject is the noun “pizza.” The infinitive functions in the sentence as an adjective. Moreover, infinitives function as adverbs when they are used to give more information about adjectives, verbs, or other adverbs in the sentence. For example, “the parents are happy to see their daughter.” The infinitive is “to see,” and it gives information about the adjective “happy.”

Does Strong Verb List change from the United States to Great Britain?

The strong verb list does not change from the United States to Great Britain. Strong verbs in the United States are the same as in Great Britain. The verb changes as they are used, notably with different people and at different times. Strong verbs change in tenses but do not change in the way of writing, whether in American English or British English. Nevertheless, irregular verbs change the spelling of past tense and past participle. Strong verbs are usually irregular verbs in which the past tense or the past participle changes in various ways, but frequently by changing the vowel of the present tense form. Not all verbs with a change in the stem vowel are strong, but they are capable of irregular weak verbs. The pronunciation and accent of the strong verbs have little distinction in American and British English, but their definitions are the same.

Do Verb affect Search Engine Optimization?

Yes, the verb affects Search Engine Optimization. Search engine optimization is based on the keywords, and the verb used affects the relevance of the article or how well the information on the page relates to a search query. Relevant content means getting the right content, to the right person, at the right time. However, Google measures the number of visitors and how they behave. The voice of the sentence somehow has an impact on the SEO. The active voice seems more engaging and makes people stay and click more on the site than the passive voice. Using passive voice has a lousy reputation in Search Engine Optimization, since its construction is more complex and difficult to read. It is better to use active voice in writing to optimize the content and obtain higher positions in the search engine results pages. 

Do Strong Verb affect User Experience?

Yes, strong verb affects user experience. Strong verbs make the article more interesting to read, aside from keeping it short and precise. Readers are more engaged in articles that are more concise, do not use repetitive or bland verbs, and do not have vague descriptions. Strong verbs reduce the usage of adverbs. It makes the content more specific and improves the writing. Additionally, strong verbs avoid writing in the passive voice. Active voice is more engaging to read and gives a better user experience. Strong verbs help to remove wordiness by replacing different forms of the verb “to be.” It allows the writer to lessen the usage of words such as “was,” “are,” “is,” and “were.” Using strong verbs makes the reader understand the message writers want to convey, since it is the objective of why writers create content to communicate. Writers need to write more simply and understandably. Misusing words leads to misunderstanding or confusion among the readers. Writers must be aware of the words that they are going to use because aside from keywords being used to look for relevant articles, it also impacts the tone and the style of writing. Word choices cause the readers to have specific feelings or connections with the content. A good choice of words makes it easy to communicate. 

How do Content Writers use Strong Verb words in English?

The content writer uses strong verb words in English effectively. Using weak verbs makes the content look unexciting, tedious, or dull. Content writers use strong verbs in writing to make the readers enjoy reading and keep them interested. Replace each weak verb with a strong one. Strong verbs make the readers get precise and stronger visuals. Imagination is part of reading. Readers are not able to fully understand the content if they are not entirely picturing what’s happening. Strong verbs form a specific image and emotions in the reader’s mind. It makes the readers more invested and leaves them feeling like they are part of the story or content. Additionally, content writers need to focus on learning the strong verb words and their meanings for better writing. It is important to know how and when to use the words to avoid misusing them. However, filling the content with strong verbs and overdoing it has the opposite result. Writers must use strong verbs in content writing effectively. Choosing the right verb makes the content writing stronger, clearer, and more effective. 

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