What does PS Mean? P.S Meaning and How to Write it?

“PS” or “P.S.” is the abbreviation for postscript. Postscript comes from the Latin word postscriptum, meaning “written afterward.” A postscript is a short message appended to the end of a letter. It is placed after the signature of the sender. Particularly in sales and marketing promotion letters, postscripts are used to make a final persuasive pitch or offer an additional incentive to a potential customer in business letters. A “PS” is used to add a reminder, make a joke, or emphasize something that is already in the message. A writer is able to add a “PS” at the end of the letter or communication followed by a quick comment if the sender failed to include something in the body of the communication. One common mistake in writing and including a postscript message in a letter or communication is that many people trying to follow patterns inadvertently write “PSS” instead of “PPS” when adding something more after the postscript. The postscript, or “PS,” is a flexible tool that has been used for millennia in other forms and for centuries in written communication. Postscripts convey supplementary information that the letter’s or email’s author either overlooked until the very end, is pertinent to the message itself, or is in some other way unrelated to the remainder of the communication.

The abbreviation “PS” appears after the main body and signature in a written letter. Post means “after” and scriptum means “written.” “PS” is intended as an afterthought or extra detail that is not covered in the letter’s body. “PS” was used more frequently when handwritten letters were the most common type of communication. Today, not only traditional letter writing contains “PS.” Instant messaging, chat, and social media platforms have used “PS” in different manners and for different purposes. A historical “PS” example is written by the President of the United States of America President. Thomas Jefferson, when the president sent a letter to Pierre Samuel Dupont de Nemours, wrote, P.S. If you return to us, bring a couple of a pair of true-bred shepherd’s dogs. You will add a valuable possession to a country now beginning to pay great attention to raising sheep.

What does PS Mean?

“PS,” which stands for “PostScript,” is a term that refers to an additional thought that is added to letters or communications after they have been completed. A “PS” is used to add a reminder, make a joke, or emphasize something that is already in the message. “PS,” was derived from the Latin postcriptum, which literally means “written after.” Writers discovered that recollecting an important detail only after the letter had been signed off was typical and usual during the era of handwritten and typed letters. A “PS” was helpful in that situation. “PS” is utilized to add a smart or humorous postscript for effect. A postscript is helpful in the business setting, if the writer wants to underline a particular point in the letter or if something significant comes up after the letter has been written. The necessity to rework the letter is avoided by using a postscript.  

How to Write a PS Text?

Writer must add a “PS” at the end of the letter or communication followed by a quick comment if the sender failed to include something in the body of the communication. The prevalence of digital communication today makes it simple for people to alter communications before sending. Using “PS” is a common practice for a variety of purposes, including an unrelated note or grabbing the reader’s attention. People add a “PPS” (post postscript) after a “PS” to add further extra messages. However, it is advantageous to keep “PS” to one, as it shows professionalism and highlights the point that the writer is trying to make. 

Listed below are the 5 steps in writing a PS text.

  1. Plan when to use “PS”: Decide when and how to use PS before including one in any communication. “PS” usually indicates a light-hearted tone, although there are numerous ways to employ a “PS.” Consider whether to have a formal or informal relationship with the receiver when deciding when to use a “PS.”
  2. Select the desired punctuation: The following are linguistically appropriate options for punctuating PS: “PS”, “P.S.”, “PS:”, and “P.S.:”. A writer must punctuate the postscript in any of the ways listed unless the company has a specific style standard that must be adhered to. Consider the same punctuation every time writing and use PS to preserve consistency.
  3. Think of the goal of the message: Determining the purpose of the “PS” helps the author write it in a clear and simple manner. Business people include a “PS” in the message to communicate a deadline to the receiver, create motivation, expand a point, emphasize an essential idea, and customize the message.
  4. Write the PS message: Write the message of the “PS” after deciding when and why to include one in the communication. Brief messages known as postscripts address the communication’s topic. For instance, if communicating with a manager with multiple queries, the “PS” makes a reference to the most crucial issue to highlight its significance. Additionally, “PS” must be used to summarize the letter, which eliminates the need for recipients to send follow-up messages. 
  5. Proofread, edit, and revise: It is crucial to review and edit the postscript after writing and before sending the communication. Make sure that the “PS” is clear and free of grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. A perfect, error-free “PS” is important because a “PS” is part of the whole message, and recipients are most likely to remember the last part of the letter.

One common mistake in writing and including a postscript message in a letter or communication is many people trying to follow patterns inadvertently write “PSS” instead of “PPS” when adding something more after the postscript. Since modern technology makes it so simple to edit and add to writing, it is preferable to just go back and put the new information at a suitable location in the writing’s main body. Authors come seen as lazy and uneducated when using “PSS.”  

How to Punctuate Postscript?

The authors wonder something or another about the punctuation requirements of “PS.” Does it need to be capitalized? Or does “PS” is used with or without periods? Some people even wonder whether it is necessary to include any following punctuation after “PS.” Keeping both alphabets capitalized is the proper way. However, grammarians continue to disagree about the use of periods. 

Listed below are the instructions for punctuating the postscript.

  1. Both “PS” and “P.S.” are correct: The use of periods is determined by the style manual being adhered to, the target audience, and personal preferences.
  2. “PS” must always be capitalized: Writers must maintain both the “P” and “S” capitalized. PostScripts or “PS” must always be capitalized with or without periods. 

An example of a “PS” note for a letter includes, “PS: Please read the book I sent you and what you think about it.” Or in other forms such as, “P.S.: Please read the book I sent you and what you think about it.”; “PS Please read the book I sent you and what you think about it.”; or “P.S. Please read the book I sent you and what you think about it.” The example of a PS note here is to remind the receiver to read the book and let the sender of the thoughts about the book. According to the Cambridge Dictionary, British English must be written using the “PS” format. Consequently, according to the Cambridge Dictionary, “P.S.,” the format for American English is with periods after each letter. The Chicago Manual of Style, however, prefers “PS” without periods.  

How to Format a PostScript?

The Postscript, or “PS,” is a flexible tool that has been used for millennia in other forms and for centuries in written communication. Postscripts convey supplementary information that the letter’s or email’s author either overlooked until the very end, is pertinent to the message itself, or is in some other way unrelated to the remainder of the communication. Be it a business email, a letter to a friend or loved one, or copy for a marketing message. Anyone is able to use a postscript to effectively express the tone and information the author wishes to convey to the reader. “PS” has been formatted because it has become the standard. Formatting a “PS” differs only to whom the letter or communication is addressed. 

Listed below are the instructions for formatting a postscript.

  1. Postscript must go after the signature: Postscripts were first mostly used to include information after the letter was completed, and the author had gone over it. In keeping with such custom, the “PS” must be placed below or next to the signature to emphasize the postscript’s afterthought character. 
  2. If prefer not to use “P.S.,” write “PS.”: The two abbreviations for postscript, “PS” and “P.S.,” are interchangeable and more frequently used in US English than UK English. The author ought to pick the one that appeals the most. But it’s crucial to remember that “P.S.” must not have a comma after it. Neither “PS” nor “P.S.” are regarded as appropriate methods to begin a postscript. 
  3. Put a “P” after “P.S.” to add more postscripts: Since “post” in “postscript” is a Latin word for “after” and “script” is the Latin word for “writing,” adding another “P” to “P.S.” results in “after-after-writing,” or “P.P.S.” Even while adding ‘P’s is necessary, the tone is adorable and can even border on cheeky or funny, so anything longer than “P.P.S,” like “P.P.P.P.S.”, must only be used for light-hearted emails or personal communications to co-workers and peers. 
  4. A postscript must be brief: A lengthy “P.S.” is unnecessary, especially in business or marketing contexts. A lengthy “PS” shows that the author did not carefully plan the message because, if the author had, the information must have been in the body. A postscript is easier to manage if there is a 4-5 line limit. A long “P.S.” in a personal message simply indicates that the author had another point wanted to make when the author recalled it. Adding a whole new story in a “P.S.” to a friend or family member is acceptable.   

Where is PS used in the text?

Traditionally, the acronym “PS” appears after the main body and signature in a written letter. Post means “after” and scriptum means “written.” PS is intended as an afterthought or extra detail that is not covered in the letter’s body. “PS” was used more frequently when handwritten letters were the most common type of communication. However, in the digital world, businesses and personal messages and communications now used the term “P.S.” taking advantage of “PS” as a symbol of reminder and emphasis. The bearing of the PS being placed at the end of each communication is derived from the term itself. Post means “after” and scriptum means “written.” Thus, after the writer signs off on a letter or email, the “PS” or postscript appears at the end.    

Is it normal to use PS in business emails?

Yes, it is normal to use “PS” in business emails. It goes without saying that the author can alter the content and add extra information to the email’s body before pressing the “send” button if someone is typing out an email. However, in the business context, especially, marketing professionals believe that adding a “PS” is a smart move for grabbing the reader’s attention and increasing the likelihood that targeted customers act on the call to action. An example of a postscript in an email is used to entice the recipient with special offers, which includes using a link or direct digital traffic toward the business website. “PS: Click to learn more about the new collection and to view current specials and discounts.”

Do people use PS for regular text messages?

Yes, people use “PS” for regular text messages. “PS” stands for “PostScript” in texting, much like PS does in written communication. “PS” is a way to add information to the message that initially forgot to write. “PS” is frequently used in texting as an alternative to “by the way”. In texting, people use “PS” by simply adding “PS” and including the information after “PS,” if ever something that must have been included at the beginning of the message was forgotten or just to emphasize a point. An example of a postscript in a text message is used to emphasize a point or denote a reminder. “After dancing all night, we eventually returned home because we were too worn out. “PS: I met a really handsome guy!” “So that’s pretty much it. Oh, PS, I forgot to mention John said you must call him.”

Is it normal to use PS in chat?

Yes, it is normal to use “PS” in chat. Regular text messages and business communications is a chat platform that users are able to “PS” just like in emails. “PS” in chat serves the same purpose as “PS” in other mediums of communication. “PS” conveys supplementary information that the letter’s or email’s author either overlooked until the very end, is pertinent to the message itself, or is in some other way unrelated to the remainder of the communication. “PS” is typically used in chat when a message was sent by a sender lacking or with the purpose of highlighting key points. An example of a postscript in the chat is a reminder, just like a PS in a text message. “You are essentially through the work once you have reviewed the excel document. Got it? PS: As soon as you’re finished, send Peter the document via email.”

Can a letter have multiple PS?

Yes, a writer is able to use multiple PS in a letter. However, note that adding additional PS must be formatted correctly. Using another PS in the letter when adding another PS is not allowed because “PS” stands for “postscript,” so when adding a second “PS” at the end of a letter, use “PPS,” not “PSS.” The term derives from the Latin post scriptum, spelled postscriptum, which means “written after” or, more specifically, “what follows the writing.” It is proper to use two “P’s” when writing the second postscript (PPS). Writing PSS for the second postscript is a common mistake. An example of a letter with multiple “PS” includes a personal note towards a loved one. “PS: Don’t forget to feed the dogs and the cats. P.P.S: I love you!”

How to use PostScript in letters?

Postscripts were added as an afterthought after the letter was written. Email started to replace other forms of communication when the internet first came around. A new era of short-form abbreviations and communication etiquette began during that time. The postscripts were unharmed despite the fact that technology makes it simple for writers to change letters. Postscripts are being used today in a manner similar to how “PS” was used in written letters.  

Listed below is a guide on how to use postscripts in letters.

  1. First, write the letter or other correspondence as usual: Compose the letter with the message wanting to convey. Write the letter and other correspondence as how it is usually done. The first step is the easiest one, draft the letter. There are no limitations to the number of pages of the letter to include a “PS” at the end of it. However, with proper spacing, a single-page letter is encouraged. 
  2. Second, end the message with “Thank you” or “Sincerely.”: The next step is ending the letter with the typical ending note of “Thank you” or “Sincerely.” Closing remarks such as “Truly yours” and “Love” are acceptable to use. Below the closing remarks must be the signature over the printed name. 
  3. Lastly, add a postscript by beginning it with “PS” and then adding whatever the author wishes to: The “PS” must be placed below the signature over a printed name. Implying that in the case of multiple pages letters, “PS” must be on the last page of the letter. There is no need to adjust the size of the letter when writing the “PS.” The text in the “PS” must not be of the same size as the content of the letter. More must be added if necessary after the first postscript. Adding another “PS” is accomplished via the post-postscript abbreviation or “PPS.” Avoid appearing silly (and uninformed) by making sure to use the right abbreviation in the letter. Many people make the error of writing “PSS” rather than “PPS.”  

What are the examples of PostScript from historical letters?

Postscript dates back to the days before the internet when people wrote and typed letters to one another. Postscripts were added as an afterthought after the first letter was written. Consider that as an author was finalizing a letter, the author suddenly realized there was something forgot to include. A “PS” is appropriate at that point. “PS” must be used for impact by including a humorous epitaph. Even to emphasize something or to say, “So there!” style of declaration.

Below are 5 examples of PostScript from historical letters.

  • Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 24 July 1775 contains a PS written, “P.S. I wish I had given you a complete history from the beginning to the end of the journey, of the behavior of my compatriots. No mortal tale could equal it. I will tell you in the future, but you shall keep it secret. The fidgets, the whims, the caprice, the vanity, the superstition, the irritability of some of us is enough to——”
  • A letter from Elizabeth Taylor to Richard Burton before getting the divorce in 1973 includes a PS written, “PS. O’ Love, let us never take each other for granted again. P.P.S. How about that — 10 years!”
  • Elvis Presley’s letter to President Nixon in 1970 contain a PS written, “P.S. I believe that you, Sir, were one of the Top Ten Outstanding Men of America also. I have a personal gift for you that I would like to present to you, and you can accept it, or I will keep it for you until you can take it.”
  • E.B. White’s letter to Harold Ross, the editor of The New Yorker, on August 28, 1944, includes a PS written. “P.S. The de-stapling machine works better than I would have believed possible.”
  • James Thurber’s postscript in a letter to E.B. White on June 1961, “PS If the United States had had you and G.B. Shaw working together, would the country have had the E.B.G.B.’s? If so, it would have been good for us.”

When is P.S used for the first time?

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, “PS” dates back to the 16th century. However, there is no attribution as to who was the first to use “PS.” “PS” is centuries old. Dating back to 1778, in a letter sent from West Point, N.Y., George Washington used PS to emphasize a point. George Washington punctuated the letter with a postscript that began, “P.S. Do not delay a moment in sending for the money.” The postscript at the end of a formal letter became a place for tangents, gossip, or personal information when personal correspondence among the middle class spread in the early 1800s. “Ladies have been accused, probably with some justification, of reserving the most significant section of a letter for the postscript,” reads a letter-writing manual from 1834. Additionally, “P.S.” has left its mark on popular culture. The Beatles’ popular song “P.S. I Love You” was adapted into a 2007 film starring Hilary Swank, which was based on Cecelia Ahern’s best-selling novel of the same name. P.S. Your Cat Is Dead!, a 1972 novel by James Kirkwood Jr., was adapted into a film by Steve Guttenberg in 2002. The use of PS was perceived to be beneficial both for the sender and the receiver. Later on, the use of “PS” has become usual in writing letters and communications.    

How does PostScript evolve?

The use of postscript (PS) has always been the same. Email started to replace other forms of communication when the internet first came around. A new era of short-form abbreviations and communication etiquette began during that time. The postscripts were unharmed despite the fact that technology makes it simple for writers to change letters. Postscripts are being used today in a manner similar to how “PS” was used in written letters. Traditionally, the acronym “PS” appears after the main body and signature in a written letter. Post means “after” and scriptum means “written.” “PS” is intended as an afterthought or extra detail that is not covered in the letter’s body. “PS” was used more frequently when handwritten letters were the most common type of communication. However, in the digital world, businesses and personal messages and communications now used the term “P.S.” taking advantage of “PS” as a symbol of reminder and emphasis. People have always used it as it is, for reminders, emphasis, summary, or even unrelated information not contained in the body of the message. “PS” has adapted and is now used not only in traditionally handwritten communication but observed in regular text messages, chat emails and other communication mediums with the advent of technology. Social media was one of the factors in the revival and popularity of the use of “PS.” Be it on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and across various social media sites, “PS” must be observed, serving the purpose as an afterthought or extra detail that is not covered in the caption.   

What are the benefits of P.S in emails and letters?

“What does “PS” mean in letters?” has been a question for the new generation. Postscript, better known as “PS,” is an additional thought added to letters (and other documents) that is added after it has been completed. “PS” derives from the Latin postscriptum, which literally means “written after.” Writers discovered that recollecting an important detail only after the letter had been signed off was typical and usual during the era of handwritten and typed letters. A “PS” was helpful in that situation. “PS” is sometimes utilized to add a smart or humorous postscript for effect. In the business setting, A postscript is helpful, especially in a business setting, if the writer wants to underline a particular point in the letter or if something essential comes up after the letter has been written. The necessity to rework the letter is avoided by using a postscript.

Listed below are the benefits of P.S in emails and letters.

  • Emphasizes a Subject with more details: One must emphasize a subject with more details with the use of “PS.” The writer must restate the email’s and letter’s key points in the postscript. Using “PS” to emphasize a subject with more details is advantageous because receivers frequently remember an email’s or letter’s final sentence the most.   
  • Gives Arguments Better: Including “PS” in an email or letter allows the sender and receiver to give better arguments. Argumentation involves supporting, changing, or defending viewpoints in accordance with claims and justifications rather than merely restating. People argue to convince others to agree with what is presented and given. Therefore, a “PS” at the end of an email help facilitate the presentation of facts and claim to have a better grasp of the arguments at hand. Using “PS” to give a better argument is advantageous because the argument tries to make sense of the ambiguous situations that exist.
  • Conveys a Lasting Thought for the Recipient: “PS” is included in an email and letter to convey a lasting thought to the recipient. People tend to vividly remember the last part of an email or letter. Thus, using PS allows the sender to convey a lasting thought to the recipient. A “PS” assists in conveying friendliness, which is indicated by a personal tone.   
  • Summarizes the Text for Better Grasping: “PS” helps in summarizing the text for better grasping. “PS” is seen in the last part of an email or letter to remind, present deals, or emphasize points, but “PS” is sometimes used to summarize the main body of the email or letter for better grasping. Recipients need not re-read the whole communication to understand the crucial message embedded in the message. A writer must restate a crucial point that the writer has already covered in the context by using a postscript. “PS” aids the reader in better grasping the message’s key point.
  • Delivers a Prominent Feeling: “PS” helps in delivering a prominent feeling. “PS” is helpful for setting the tone a sender wants to use in emails and letters. A postscript is an excellent way to deliver a prominent feeling and convey information that is unrelated to the email’s subject or letter’s body. The sender must include a quick message without creating and sending a new email or letter.

1. Emphasizes a Subject with more details

The writer must emphasize a subject with more details with the use of “PS.” An author must restate the email’s and letter’s key points in the postscript. Using “PS” to emphasize a subject with more details is advantageous because receivers frequently remember an email’s or letter’s final sentence the most. Readers are more likely to recall the main point of the email and letter if the sender reinforces it in the “PS.” For instance, if sending an email or sending a letter of proposal to a business manager, the sender must include a postscript in which the sender restates the key selling point of the proposal. The sender has benefited from the use of a “PS” by emphasizing a subject with more details in that way.    

2. Gives Arguments Better

Including “PS” in an email or letter allows the sender and receiver to give better arguments. Argumentation involves supporting, changing, or defending viewpoints in accordance with claims and justifications rather than merely restating. Arguments develop as a result of the contributions made by the dialogue participants. The goal of argumentation is to persuade a listener to agree. Thus, “PS” must be used to highlight facts, and claims presented by the sender. People argue to convince others to agree with what is presented and given. Therefore, a “PS” at the end of an email must help facilitate the presentation of facts and claim to have a better grasp of the arguments at hand. Using “PS” to give a better argument is advantageous because the argument tries to make sense of the ambiguous situations that exist. “PS” must be used to give better arguments by clarifying, explaining or defending actions, solving problems, or making judgments.

3. Conveys a Lasting Thought for the Recipient

“PS” is included in an email and letter to convey a lasting thought to the recipient. People tend to vividly remember the last part of an email or letter. Thus, using “PS” allows the sender to convey a lasting thought to the recipient. The author has the option to personalize the emails using a “PS” to convey a lasting thought to the recipient. “PS” is helpful for setting the tone the sender wants to use in emails and letters. Postscripts are more informal, which is useful for underlining, for instance, how much an author cares about each of the recipients. A “PS” assists in conveying friendliness, which is indicated by a personal tone.   

4. Summarizes the Text for Better Grasping

“PS” helps in summarizing the text for better grasping. “PS” is seen in the last part of an email or letter to remind, present deals, or emphasize points, but it is used to summarize the main body of the email or letter for better grasping. “PS” must be utilized to reduce text, including only the vital information in the “PS” text. Recipients need not re-read the whole communication to understand the crucial message embedded in the message by doing so. The author must restate a crucial point that has already been covered in the context by using a postscript. “PS” aids the reader in better grasping the message’s key point. The author must emphasize a specific point because “PS” separates the new statement from the rest of the text.   

5. Delivers a Prominent Feeling

“PS” helps in delivering a prominent feeling. “PS” is helpful for setting the tone the sender wants to use in emails and letters. A postscript is an excellent way to deliver a prominent feeling and convey information that is unrelated to the email’s subject or letter’s body. The sender must include a quick message without creating and sending a new email or letter. For instance, the sender wants to congratulate a colleague on an achievement or draw attention to it among co-workers. The sender must include a “PS” congratulating a specific team member on a goal achieved or for giving the best for the quarter in a follow-up email or letter that highlights a team meeting.  

When not to use a Postscript in the text?

Postscripts must not be used when the text is short. A “PS” must never be used within a brief letter. The postscript is meant to be an afterthought, and a short letter can only include one thought. There is always that room for thought to be included in the main body of the letter. However, there is no restriction as to what platform “PS” must not be used as well as themes and context. Insert a “PS” in every other circumstance to reiterate the headline, denote a reminder, give emphasis, or simply personalize “PS” text.     

When does Content Writer use PS on web pages?

Content writers use “PS” on web pages when writers are working on email marketing. “PS” has email marketing powers, especially in lead generation. “PS” in email marketing serves as the final thought which changes the game of the usual email marketing campaign. Content writers use “PS” on web pages as decoys, and affix a hook to it (a clickable URL that redirects readers to the landing page). Content writers use “PS” on web pages to reiterate the core selling point from a different perspective. A content writer working on email marketing use “PS” to create urgency.  Therefore, content writers use “PS” in email marketing, ensuring that the email has everything necessary to compel readers to respond by going to a landing page or getting in touch with someone directly. The “PS” serves as the last opportunity, thus, content writers make it matter because a well-crafted PS can be a determining factor when the email contents are not getting responses. A “PS” is typically included in a personalized email that ends with the name of a genuine person. It is the type of email that aims to be as personalized. An attractive feature of a “PS” is that it strengthens the “personal” tone, almost as if it were a side comment made just for the email recipient. Thus, content writers use “PS” for email marketing because of its inherent advantage. Moreover, email marketers are fans of using “PS” for email marketing because it facilitates the introduction of bonuses. Marketers promote the main item or deal in the main email text, when recipients take action right away, bonuses are given in the “PS.” It heightens the feeling of urgency. “How to write better content?” is among the questions of the content writers, thus writers now maximized the benefits of using “PS.” The use of “PS” by the content writer on web pages is a smart decision. “PS” adds options and facilitates the marketing campaign.           

Does PS help with search engine optimization?

Yes, “PS” helps with Search Engine Optimization (SEO). “PS” is helpful in embedding links that redirect receivers to a landing page. Thus, “PS” help with optimizing the website of a business. Moreover, “PS” helps SEO by providing an additional medium to connect and reach the targeted audiences. Postscript (PS) is an additional thought added to letters (and other documents) that are added after it has been completed. A postscript is helpful, especially in a business setting if the writer wants to underline a particular point in the letter or if something important comes up after the letter has been written. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) refers to the process of making changes to a website in order to improve its visibility when users search for goods or services associated with the website on Google, Bing, and other search engines. The more visible the pages are in search results, the more likely it is to get noticed and draw both new and returning clients to the website. PS and SEO are terms that work hand in hand by providing each of the benefits and advantages. PS and SEO are related in a way that PS helps with SEO, and SEO is maximized with the use of “PS.”   

Is it beneficial for a content writing team to use and know PS?

Yes, it is beneficial for a content writing team to use and know “PS.” “PS” offers benefits and advantages to content writers, especially content writers working on SEO. Thus, using and knowing “PS” gives leverage to the content writing team. Using and knowing “PS” gives extra knowledge to the content writing team to improve write-ups and maximize the benefits of “PS.” Postscript (PS) is an additional thought added to letters (and other documents) that are added after it has been completed. The necessity to rework the letter is avoided by using a postscript. Content Writing, on the other hand, is the practice of creating materials, frequently for marketing goals, especially in the field of digital marketing. Content writing sometimes refers to any type of material that calls for planning, writing, and editing, although people might think of a blog post and website landing pages. The relationship between the content writing team and “PS” is separated by a fine thread. The content writing team must use the benefits of “PS” to produce quality and detailed writing. The content writing team must integrate “PS” in writing an article to connect to the readers.    

How does Generation Z use PS in Social Media?

Generation Z is observed to use “PS” in instant messages. “PS” stands for “PostScript” in social media, much like “PS” does in written communication. “PS” is a way to add information to the message that initially forgot to write. “PS” is used in instant messages as an alternative to “by the way”. Generation Z uses “PS” by simply adding “PS” and including the information in the “PS” if ever something that must have been included at the beginning of the message was forgotten or just to emphasize a point in the message. An example of a postscript in an instant message is used to emphasize a point or denote a reminder. However, on other social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and the like, the use of “PS” in the captions is mainly for highlighting trends and what is in.  

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