301 HTTP Response Status Code Definition: Example, Usage, Methods

The 301 HTTP Status Code response means that the resources have moved permanently. The 301 HTTP Status Code indicated resource has been definitively moved to the URL supplied by the Location headers. Software redirection to the new URL and search engines modify their links to the resource. Considering the possibility that the server has a preferred choice of representation, it should provide the specific URI for that representation in the Location field and client specialists may use the Location field as an incentive for programmed redirection. Except in the event of a shown in any instance, the 301 HTTP Status Code response is cacheable.  However, even though the standard specifies that the method and body stay unaltered when the redirection is executed, not all user-agents comply with this condition. If you’re using the 301 HTTP Status Code as a response for GET or HEAD methods, you should use the 308 HTTP Status Code instead, since changing the method is specifically disallowed with this status. Its difference to the 300 HTTP Status Codes Multiple Choices diverts status response demonstrates that the request has more than one potential response.

What does the 301 HTTP Status Code Mean?

The 301 HTTP Status Code Moved Permanently is apparently the most significant of the redirection status codes. When not utilized as expected, it can slow down your web optimization and bury your site for eternity. The 301 HTTP Status Code can likewise be made an exceptionally terrible client experience and increment the beat you experience on your site. The 301 HTTP Status Code lets the client know that the asset they look for has been moved forever, and afterward presents the URL to the new area of the asset. The 301 HTTP Status Code completes two things: advises the client where to track down the asset and furthermore assists the client with knowing where to go the following time they need the asset. The new area for the asset is indicated by the Location header.

How to Use 301 HTTP Status Code for a Website?

To use the 301 HTTP Status Code in a site, the web developer should leverage backend tools for the webserver for scaling, efficiency, and the capacity to respond to client requests and demands immediately. The 301 HTTP Status Code with the “header” function may be used by a developer in JavaScript, Python, Ruby, PHP, Java, C#.Net, Perl, C++, Scala, and Kotlin. In using these tools the web developer should not alter the body when redirection is done and take control over the system in a correct way as this is apparently the most significant of the redirection status codes. 

How to Check the 301 HTTP Status Code?

To check the 301 HTTP Status Code use the web browser network tab and developer tools for every resource that the client uses.

Which HTTP Methods are used with 301 HTTP Status Code?

There are two methods that can be used with the 301 HTTP Status Code. See below.

  • The GET method is used in the 301 HTTP Header Status Code wherein data is sent back with regards to the response. The GET is an entity correlating to the particular request of resource and is delivered in the response.
  • The HEAD method is utilized in the 301 HTTP Header Status Code. The HEAD is an element header field relating to the mentioned asset that is sent in the reaction with no message-body.

There are related HTTP Response Headers with the 301 HTTP Status Code. Below are the related HTTP Response Headers with 301 HTTP Status Code.

  • 308 Permanent Redirect HTTP Status Code: The 308 Permanent Redirect HTTP Status Code is related to the 301 HTTP Status Code because they are both redirection messages. The 308 Permanent Redirect HTTP Status Code is the direct sibling of the 307 HTTP Status Code. 
  • 306 unused HTTP Status Code: The 306 Permanent Redirect HTTP Status Code is related to the 301 HTTP Status Code because they are both redirection messages. This response code is no not in use; instead, it is reserved. It was previously used in an earlier version of the HTTP/1.1 protocol.

What are the Browsers Compatibility of the 301 HTTP Status Code?

You can see the table that shows the browser’s compatibility of the 301 HTTP Status Code below. 

Browser NameBrowser Compatibility of 301 HTTP Status Code
ChromeYES
FirefoxYES
Internet ExplorerYES
OperaYES
SafariYES
WebView AndroidYES
Chrome AndroidYES
Firefox for AndroidYES

What are the other Similar Status Codes to the 301 HTTP Status Code?

There are other similar HTTP Status Codes to 301 HTTP Status Code. The following are listed below.

  • 302 Found HTTP Status Code: The 302 Found HTTP Status Code is similar to the 301 because they are both redirection messages. This is the direct sibling of the 301 HTTP Status Code. It is utilized for impermanent divert.
  • 303 See Other HTTP Status Code: The 303 See Other HTTP Status Code is similar to the 301 HTTP Status Code because they are both redirection messages. This status code lets the client know that the divert doesn’t redirect to the recently transferred resource but to another page, similar to a thank you page or status screen page.
  • 304 Not Modified HTTP Status Code: The 304 Not Modified HTTP Status Code is similar to the 301 HTTP Status Code because they are both redirection messages. This lets the client know that the resource they are attempting to get has not changed, so they ought to hold the duplicate they have.
  • 307 Temporary Redirect HTTP Status Code: The 307 Temporary Redirect HTTP Status Code is similar to the 301 HTTP Status Code because they are both redirection messages. The 307 Temporary Redirect HTTP Status Code is sent by the server when it plans to unequivocally advise the client to keep up with the strategy initially utilized for the request.
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