Blond vs Blonde: Difference between Them and How to correctly use them

“Blond” and “blonde” are two different terms that differ both in spelling and meaning. The word “blond” is being used as a noun to describe a man with yellowish hair or as an adjective to describe anything male that has a yellowish color. On the other hand, “blonde,” spelled with an “e,” is similar to “blond,” which is a noun that refers to someone with pale yellow hair color or an adjective that describes a thing that has a yellow color. However, “blonde” is associated with a female subject. “Blond” and “blonde” are commonly used to describe people living in Northern Europe.

The comparison between “blond” and “blonde” are listed below.

  • “Blond” is used to describe masculine objects.
  • “Blond” is used as a noun.
  • “Blond” is used as an adjective.
  • “Blond” is the preferred spelling in the US.
  • “Blond” is a French word.
  • “Blonde” is used to describe feminine objects.
  • “Blonde” is used as an adjective.
  • “Blonde” is used as a noun.
  • “Blonde” is a French word.
  • “Blonde” is the preferred word in British English.

It is highly important to know which one refers to a male or female subject in deciding whether to use “blond” or “blonde in a particular sentence. The distinguishing factor to identify the sex or gender of the subject is the pronoun “he”, “she”, “his”, and “her.” A sentence that has “he” and “his” must use “blond” as it is associated with a male subject. Meanwhile, a sentence with “she” and “her” must utilize “blonde” since the pronouns are talking about a female subject.

Some example sentences of the word “blond” include, “Have you seen that blond guy over there? He’s the culprit for the chaos that happened in the cafeteria last week.” “It is confirmed that Jennie is dating that blond guy from section C because I saw them in an ice cream parlor yesterday.” The term “blond” was used correctly in the example sentences due to its association with the word “guy” which is used to describe a male person. On the other hand, some examples of the word “blonde” spelled with an “E” are “She looks so sexy and beautiful with her blonde hair and red dress.” “I always think of blonde women as either Europeans or North Americans.” The word “Blonde” was used exactly as intended, mainly because it was linked to a female subject in the sentence. 

Every writer asks, “why to know the difference between “blond” and “blonde” for content writing and marketing?” It is important to know the difference between these words in order to write better content and communicate in a healthier way. Content writing and marketing are very particular with the usage of words, especially in terms of sex and gender description. The proper use of terms is highly significant since it enables readers and users to clearly understood the context and information written in the content and marketing. Misuse of “blond” and “blonde” in content writing and marketing causes misinterpretation and confusion. Therefore, the difference between “blond” and “blonde” must be learned, especially since they are very sex- and gender-specific. 

What does “Blond” Mean?

“Blond” is a word that defines a man or a male subject that has hair with a color pale or light yellow. “Blond” was acquired from the Old French words “Blund” and “Blont” which means a color between golden and light chestnut. The first usage of the English term “blond” was dated way back in 1481. It was then reintroduced in the 17th century from the French language. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “blond” is defined as “(of hair) fair or pale yellow.” “Blond” is a commonly used English word to describe the yellowish fair hair color. Knowing the definition and meaning of “blond” is important in daily life, especially if it is an adjective. It is necessary to carefully analyze the words used in a sentence because the addition of letters and removal of letters in a word automatically changes the meaning of the sentence.

What are the sentence examples with “Blond”?

Listed below are the sentence examples with the word “Blond.” 

  • Mom had passed on his curly blond hair to John and Anna. The example sentence has the adjective “blond” which was used to describe the physical appearance of the hair.
  • The woman looked like an ancient Greek queen with blond hair and chiseled features. The “blond” in the sentence example is another adjective that clearly states the physical characteristic of the subject. 
  • She flipped a few strands of her blond hair back in place. The sentence example has “blond” which serves as an adjective that defines the color of the hair of the subject. 
  • He grimaced and turned to see the tall blond striding toward her office. The example has utilized “blond” as a noun because it is the subject itself, and the word was not used to describe the subject. 
  • The man beside him was blond, her eyes pale blue. The sentence uses “blond” as a noun because it is a subject, and not treated merely as a description.

When to use the word “Blond” in a sentence?

The word “blond” is used to describe nouns for man which means the yellowish hair color of a man. The synonyms of the word “blond” are “fair,” “light,” “light-colored,” “light-toned,” “yellow,” “flaxen,” etc. The word “blond” must be used when a sentence is talking about something that is a shade of yellow, like a head of hair or the color of an object. An example of “blond” that pertains to a male subject is, “We saw a blond guy pass this area earlier, but we did not remember his face.” The usage of “blond” in the sentence is correct, as the subject needs to be properly named by its primary noticeable characteristic. An example of “blond” as a description of an object is, “The motif of their wedding is blond, which makes it unique and eye-catching.” The word “blond” went in the right place in the sentence, mostly because it was able to describe a physical trait of the subject.

How often is the word “Blond” used in a sentence?

“Blond” is often used once in a sentence to describe a particular color of things, especially when linked to a male subject. The term “blond” usually exists one time only in the sentence, mainly because using it twice or thrice makes the sentence grammatically incorrect. For instance, in a sentence “I like all the gifts that I have received, the t-shirt is blond, the shoes are blond, and the watch is blond.” The sentence example is grammatically incorrect because it is redundant, and using one “blond” word is already sufficient in the sentence to properly describe the subjects.

What are the synonyms of “Blond”?

There are a lot of synonyms for the word “blond.” Some of them are “ash blond,” “silvery,” “golden,” “yellowish,” “yellow,” “light-toned,” “fair,” etc. Some examples of synonyms are “I normally use dark blonde or dark “ash blonde”(blond),” “They are greenish gray to “yellowish” (blond) with many large round dark spots.” There are variations of the word “blond.” Common examples include the following: “ash-blond,” “blond/flaxen,” “dirty blond,” “golden blond,” “honey blond,” “platinum blond,” and “sandy blond.” These variations of the word “blond” have been defined to describe the different shades and sources of hair color more accurately.

What does “Blonde” Mean?

The word “blonde” is used as a noun. It describes a woman or girl with fair hair. However, “blonde” is sometimes used as an adjective. The word “blonde” is usually spelled in British English. The word “blonde” was derived from french, which has grammatical gender depending on whether they are applied to man or woman. It was considered in French and reinstated in English in the 17th century. The first appearance of blondes was 11,000 years ago. Naturally, blonde hair is found in people living in the northern half of Europe. According to the Oxford Dictionary data, it is likely to be spelled as “blonde” as a used reference to women. The word “blonde” is a common word used in the English language in the 20th century. Knowing the definition and meaning of “blonde” is important in daily life, especially if it is an adjective. It is necessary to carefully analyze the words used in a sentence because the addition of letters and removal of letters in a word automatically changes the meaning of the structure.

What are the sentence examples with “Blonde”?

Listed below are the sentence examples with the word “Blonde.”

  • “All evening peter paid attention to a blue-eyed, plump, and pleasing little blonde, the wife of one of the provincial officials.” The example sentence used the adjective version word “blonde” to be one of the descriptions of the female subject in the sentence. 
  • “Anna was of above-average height with long, dark blonde curls loosely captured at her neck.” The “blonde” in the sentence example was used as an adjective that describes the subject.
  • “Then he glowered with a smile to match Dean’s. I saw you and your blonde friend cuddled up down at the park.” The sentence example used “blonde” as a noun since it pertains to a blonde person. The “blonde friend” is the subject itself. 
  • “Simpson was studying the Eskimo in and around Victoria I., where they discovered the so-called blonde Eskimo, who had never previously encountered white men.” The term “blonde” in the example was used as a noun to name a particular thing. 
  • “She shook her head and twisted to face the corner, where the blonde Oracle and brunette Healer sat together.” The sentence example uses the noun “Blonde” as a part of the name of the subject. 

When to use the word “Blonde” in a sentence?

The word “blonde” in french is described as feminine. It regularly extends to English adjectives, mostly in British English. The synonym of “Blonde” is “fair” which means light-colored, particularly white or yellow. There are variations of the word “blonde.” Common examples include the following; “ash-blond,” “blond/flaxen,” “dirty blond,” “golden blond,” “honey blond,” “platinum blond,” and “sandy blond.” These variations of the word “blonde” have been defined to describe the different shades and sources of hair color more accurately.

How often is the word “Blonde” used in a sentence?

The word “blonde” is similar to “blond” which is often used only once in the sentence. Using “Blonde” once in sentences is already enough to properly describe a particular subject or topic. For instance, “The dress and bag we bought for shopping are all blonde which suits my hair color.” The usage of “blonde” twice or thrice is considered redundant, which makes the sentence unpleasant to read and grammatically incorrect. “Blonde” is a sex- and gender-specific word, and must be used with a female subject only.

What are the synonyms of “Blonde”?

The synonyms for the word “blonde” are  “silvery,” “ash blond,” “golden,” “yellowish,” “yellow,” “light-toned,” “fair,” etc. Some examples of synonyms are “It is a silvery (blonde) white metal which burns on heating in the air,” and “He combed and arranged his golden (blonde) hair.” There are variations of the word “blonde.” Common examples include the following: “Silver Blonde,” “strawberry blonde,” “golden blonde,” “auburn blonde,” and “black blonde.” These variations of the word “blonde” have been defined to describe the different shades and sources of hair color more specifically.

How is the pronunciation of “Blond” and “Blonde”?

The word “blond” is common in the US that describes a man or boy with golden hair color, and it is pronounced as “bla:nd.” The word “blonde” is the preferred spelling in the UK, and it is pronounced as “blo:nd.” The words “blond” and “blonde” are pronounced the same, even though the definition is the same as well, The difference between these words is the reference to one letter spelling. The word “blond” refers to a man while the word “blonde” refers to a woman.

Comparison between “Blond” and “Blonde”

Listed below is the table that shows the comparison between the words “blond” and “blonde.”

BlondBlonde
DefinitionThe word “blond” describes as a noun for males.The word “blonde” is more commonly used for females
Context“Blond” is used as a noun and an adjective. The word ”blonde” is used as a noun and an adjective.
Example sentences1. He has blond hair.
2. Blond hair is very popular nowadays.
1. She decided to get blonde highlights.
2. She used to have blonde hair.

Why are “Blond” and “Blonde” misused and interchangeably in English?

The word “blond” and “blonde” are commonly misused and interchangeable words in English. The reason for that is the pronunciation. Another difference between “blond” and “blonde” is their spelling and how they are used in a sentence. The word “blond” is used to define a man or male that has golden hair color, and it is commonly used in American English. The word “blonde” is used to describe a female or woman that has golden hair color, and it is more commonly used in British English. Most speakers and writers have been using the words “blond” and “blonde” in either British English or American English forms of conversation, which leads to incorrect use of these words, especially for non-native speakers. The use of the word “blond” and “blonde” does not result in any confusion in terms of the way how it is pronounced or typed. The solution to the confusion about the words “blond” and “blonde” is to distinguish their differences by linking them to the sex and gender they are associated with. 

Are “Blond” and “Blonde” the most commonly misused English words?

Yes, the word “blond” and “blonde” are one of the most commonly misused words in English because they almost share the same definition and pronunciation. The term “blond” is pronounced as “bla:nd” in the US while the word “blond” is pronounced as “blo:nd” in the UK. The difference between “blond” and “blonde” is one letter of spelling and grammatical gender, however, those differences disappeared in the present day. Confusion happens depending on how to pronounce the words, especially in the United Kingdom and France, The solution is to be careful and use the word correctly depending on the sentence or situation to avoid incorrect usage of the word.

What are the other similar Misused Word Pairs like “Blonde” and “Blond” in English?

Listed below are the other similar misused word pair like “blonde” and “Blond” in English. 

  • “All ready” vs. “Already”: The word “all ready” and “already” are similar misused words like “Blond” and “blonde” in English.  The terms “all ready” and “already” are differed by an additional letter “l” and a space, similar to “blond” and “blonde.” The pronunciation is exactly sound alike. However, the meanings are not related because “all ready” means completely prepared, while “already” is about something that has happened before now or before a particular time in the past. 
  • “Grey” vs. “Gray”: The word “grey” and “gray” are English terms that often confuse people. These words are only distinguished by their variation in terms of the vowels used because “grey” uses “e” and “gray” uses “a.” The terms “grey” and “gray” are the identical when it comes to both pronunciation and meaning. “Grey” and “gray” means a color that sits between black and white.
  • “Besides” vs. “Beside”: The two words “besides” and “beside” are frequently interchanged in an English sentence just like “blond” and “blonde.”. “Besides” have an extra letter “s” compared to “beside” which is the same in the case of “blond” and “blonde.” The words “besides” and “beside” are closely sounding when read verbally, except for an additional “s” sound of the first word. On top of that, “besides” and “beside” refer to different things. The word “besides” is a preposition or a linking adverb that means “in addition to” or “also.” On the other hand, the word “beside” is a preposition that means “at the side of” or “next to” It is preferably a formal structure.
  • “Especially” vs. “Specially”:  The words “especially” and “specially” are words that typically cause misinterpretation and misuse. “Especially” and “specially” project similar changes to “blonde” and “blonde” where there is an additional letter “e” to the counterpart word. They are pronounced in the same manner, but they mean totally different. The term “especially” is defined as particularly, exceptionally, or above all to signify one person or thing among others. The word “specially” is another adverb that means particularly.

What are the things should a content writer consider in using the word “Blond” and “Blonde”?

The word “blond” and “blonde” are commonly confusing words. The word “blond” is common English in the US that defines the fair hair color of a man. The word “blonde” is commonly used words in the United Kingdom and in France that define the golden hair color of a woman. Content writers must consider using the words depending on the readers to formally address the structure of the sentence. Content writers must be careful using “blond” or “blonde” because these words pertain to two different subjects. Using “blond” and “blonde” interchangeably alters the meaning of the sentence, which leads to inefficient delivery of the information and misinterpretation.

Can content writers use “Blond” and “Blonde” in one sentence?

No, content writers cannot use the words “blond” and “blonde” in one sentence. The words “blond” and “blonde” are inappropriate to be used in one sentence because it becomes redundant. The meaning of these words are the same; hence, when they are used in one sentence, it becomes grammatically incorrect although “blond” and “blonde” pertain to different kinds of subjects. It is better to use “blond” and “blonde” in two separate sentences instead of using them both in a sentence. 

How do Content Writers use “Blond” and “Blonde” in their articles?

Content writers use “blond” and “blonde” in their articles that require a description of a particular hair color of a person or a color of things. Content writing demands a clear and proper presentation of information to its readers. One way of delivering the information to the readers is by using the words “blond” and “blonde” in their sentences. For instance, in the sentence, “The women in Norway are born with natural blonde hair” the description of the nationality is comprehensible due to the usage of the word “blonde.” 

Do Content Writers use “Blond” and “Blonde” in the wrong way?

No, there are no instances that content writers use “blond” and “blonde” in the wrong way. “Blond” defines a man while “blonde” defines a woman. Content writers are knowledgeable and professional about what to use when to use it, and where to use the words correctly. It is usual for everyone, especially content writers to define the correct usage of “blond” and “blonde” since it makes the content structure an accurate, trustworthy, and reliable source for the readers. Furthermore, to avoid using these words incorrectly, proofreading is very important before publishing the content.

Do Misused Words such as “Blonde” and “Blond” affect SEO and UX?

Yes, incorrect delivery of context, poor grammar, misused words, and misspelled words look unprofessional to the readers, especially to the article. Small typing errors and grammatical errors have major consequences. Incorrect usage of the word “blond” and “blonde” affect the user experience and the page ranking of SEO for a long time. It is extremely important to make sure all the words, grammar, sentences, and verbs, are accurate. Misspelled words might be unprofessional to the readers, especially to the content.

Are both “Blond” and “Blonde” considered Adjectives?

Yes, “blond” and “blonde” are both considered adjectives. The terms “blond” and “blonde” are treated as adjectives in the context of male and female traits. “Blond” is an adjective that is associated with masculinity, while “blonde” is linked with femininity. An example of using “blond” and “blonde” as an adjective in a sentence is, “Her son has blond hair and beautiful freckles.” The example sentence describes how the word “blond” is being used in a man pertaining of his yellowish hair.

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