Center or Centre: Which one is Correct?

The only thing that differentiates the words “center” and “centre” is the dialect in which they are utilized. The word “center” is being used, and it is a valid word to use in the language of the United States of America. Meanwhile, people are using the word “centre,” which, according to the rules of British English. Nevertheless, when it comes to their meanings, both of these things have the same meaning. The word “center” derives from the Greek word “Kenton,” and later from the Latin word “centrum,” which means a “sharp point, stationary pint of a pair of compasses.” The word’s origins are in Greek, but it wasn’t used in its current sense until the late Middle English period. It is most likely the reason the British still spell “centre“ with an accent. The late Middle English period changed the spelling to “center” or “centre,” as well as accepting the definition as “the middle of anything“ during the late 16th century and, more figuratively, the “point of concentration“ by the late 17th century. The noun, adjective, and verb forms of the word “center” are all in common use. As a noun, it is used to describe the exact center of something. Meanwhile, as an adverb, it means “close to“ or “right in” a particular location. Moreover, it is being used as a noun or adjective, it is formed as central and centrical, and within the prepositional phrases, in and by the center. Furthermore, if the word “center” or “centre” is used as a verb, it will describe an item that is brought to be located within or readjusted to the center of something else. The word’s current meaning and usage haven’t changed much since the 1600s, despite the fact that the two different spellings highlight brief but significant periods of popularity in the United States and elsewhere. On top of that, the spelling “centre“ became popular throughout the 1800s to indicate a more “proper” and high society use, especially in legal terms, but it declined sharply during the early 1900s and is now only used in British English.

Listed below are the example sentences of the words “center” and “centre.”

  • He released her, and she hurried away from him into the center of the hall. 
  • She fled into the cold night air, stopping only when she reached the center of the garden. 
  • Children like to be the centre of attention. 
  • The library is in the centre of the town. 

What is the Difference between Center and Centre?

The distinction between the words “center” and“centre” is determined by the language in which they are used. The word “centre” is used in British English, while the word “center” is used in American English and other English-speaking countries. People who speak American English, primarily in the United States, use the word“center“. Meanwhile, people who speak British English, primarily in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and countries in the British Commonwealth, use the word“centre.” Both the “center” and“centre“ mean “the middle of something,” and both are pronounced “SEN-ter,” though it is closer to pronouncing “SEN-tuh” if speaking with British accent. On top of that, when it comes to their definition, both save similar meanings and usage. A writer is able to use “center“ and “centre” when referring to the middle position of something, either literally or metaphorically, and usually before the preposition of. Furthermore, the word “center“ and “centre” appears in the name of a building or shopping area. Moreover, the word “center” and “centre” function as adjectives to describe a noun that’s in the middle position. However, it is common to use “central” in the case for both “center” and “centre,” though the word “central” has a definition of “main“ or “primary.“ In addition, writers are able to use the words “center” and “centre” as a verb. Be wary of spelling changes that occur when using “center” and “centre” to describe the act of making something straight. The word “center” becomes “cantering“ and “entered” in other verb tenses. Meanwhile, the word “centre” becomes “cantering” and “centered.”

Do Center and Centre mean same thing?

Yes, the word“center“ in American English and the word“centre“ in British English have the same meaning. The words “center” and “centre” have a shared origin in the Greek “Kentron” and the Latin “centrum,” both of which mean “a sharp point.” They referred to the stationary point between a pair of drafting compasses; the “center” of a circle. Moreover, the late Middle English word“center“came before the Old French “centre,” pronounce as “saunt” in French. It began to refer to“the middle of something” in the 16th century, and “center” was Shakespeare’s preferred spelling as well, as it turned up ten times in his plays, and the word “centre” appears only once. However, the French-inspired “centre” became the British spelling convention in the 17th and 18th centuries, especially after British writer Samuel Johnson included “centre” in his 1755 Dictionary of the English Language. However, the words “center” and “centre” controversy broke in 1806, and again in 1828 when American lexicographer Noah Webster listed “center,” and not “centre” in his English dictionary. Many linguists credit the worldwide popularity of “center” to date in English history. Although the Oxford English Dictionary lists both words together in its definitions.

How to Spell Center and Centre?

The American English word “center” is spelled as normally as the way it is pronounced. Meanwhile, the British English word “centre” is spelled differently; the last two letters are mixed up. However, when it comes to their pronunciation, the American English word “center” is pronounced as “SEN-TER.” On the other hand, the British English word “centre” is pronounced as “SEN-TUH.” The British English word “centre” is pronounced with an accent, while the word“center“ is pronounced normally the way it is.  

How to Use “Center“ in American English?

It is very important to note some considerations to using the American English word “center.” The spelled word “center” is used as either verb or a noun. As a verb, the spelled word “center” means to revolve around a topic, to find a middle, or to position in the middle of a predetermined area. Moreover, as a noun, the spelled word “center” refers to a type of organization like a research center, a shopping mall, a building, or a facility. It refers to the exact middle of something. The American English language must be used for American audiences. 

Listed below are the example sentences for the word “center” in American English. 

  • The city was the center of Agriculture.
  • She is always playing at the center
  • She likes visiting cultural center
  • She is the center of the event. 
  • He likes being the center of attraction. 

How to Use“Centre“ in British English?

It is very essential to note some considerations to using the British English word “centre.” The spelled word “centre” are used as a noun and verb or adjective. As a noun, it is used to describe the exact centre of something, such as a building or circle. It designates a type of organization or building, such as a research centre or athletic centre. The spelled “centre” as a verb describes an object that is caused to be within or adjust to center of something. The British English language must be used for British audience. 

Listed below are the example sentences for the word “centre” in British English. 

  • The earth is revolving at the centre of the sun. 
  • A priest is preaching at the centre of the mall.
  • She pull the table all by herself at the centre of her kitchen. 
  • The library is located at the centre of town. 
  • She stood at the centre of some photographic scene. 

What are the Common Phrase Combinations of “Center“ and “Centre“?

Listed below are the common phrase combinations of “center” and “centre.”

English WordDefinitionPhrase CombinationExample Sentences of Phrase Combination
CenterThe American English word “center” as a verb means
to occur mainly in or around (a specified place).

The American English word “center” as a noun means a place or group of buildings where a specified activity is concentrated.

The American English word “center” is mainly concerned about or involved with something specified — used in combination with a noun.
“A center for”

“A center of”


“To center”
A center for medical research.

The town was a center of discontentment.

To center the needle, turn the knob.
CentreThe British English word “centre” as a noun means the middle point of a circle or sphere, equidistant from every point on the circumference or surface.

The British English word “centre” as a verb means it occurs mainly in or around (a specified place).

The British English word “centre” as an adjective means in or by the center; central.
“A centre of”

“A centre for”


“To centre”
The town was a centre of gambling. 

The city was a centre for isolation area.

Measure the rooftop to center the solar panel.

The table shows that the spelled words “center” and“centre“ have no meaning difference. The spelled words only differ from which dialect is being used. The spelled word “center” is used only for the American English language, while the spelled word “centre” is used only for the British English language. Using these words interchangeably will result in losing the trust of potential readers. The proper use of these spelled words“center“ and “centre” will depend on who is the audience of the content. 

What are the Example Uses of “Center“ in American Publications?

Listed below are the example uses of “center“ in American Publication.

  • “The man at the center of the corruption case that led to the arrest of a former Suffolk police chief is expected to be released from prison and have his conviction tossed out on Tuesday.:” The phrase was from Long Island News 12 publication. The example was all about the man behind the corruption case which led to arresting the former police chief who is expected to be released from prison and get free from his conviction. The release date of the example was during the year 2019.
  • “Serbia on Wednesday introduced a lockdown for migrants in their refugee center outside Belgrade after an alleged attack against a woman walking with her children.:” The phrase was from the publication of US News & World Report. The example was all about the lockdown in Serbia for migrants in their refugee after an alleged attack against a woman walking with her children. The release date of the example publication was during the year 2017. 

What are the Example Uses of “Centre“ in British Publications?

Listed below are the example uses of “centre“ in British Publication.

  • “If the Countess of Wessex had been asked to hit a ball for a royal photo opportunity, rain would have stopped play. Fortunately, Sophie wasn’t required to participate, merely to admire the facilities at the National Sports Centre in Bisham Abbey, Buckinghamshire.:” The phrase was from the publication of Daily Mail. The example was all about the event for a royal photo opportunity. The example phrase was published during the year of 2017. 
  • “The Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths centre (STEM) at Airbus in Stevenage is based around the company’s Mars rover exploration programme.:” The phrase was from the publication of BBC News. The example is all about the programme that is based around the company’s Mars rover. The release date of the example was during the year 2017. 

How to Use “Center“ or “Centre“ for Content Marketing?

The use of the words “center“ and “centre“ in content marketing will depend on the audience type. Content writer have choices of which type of spelled words to used. The spelled word“center“ must only be used in American English audiences as it is the preferred choice of their language. Meanwhile, the spelled word “centre“ must only be used in British English as it is the preferred spelling choice for their language. Using these spelled words properly in content marketing will end up having a better ranking and generating more audience than using these words incorrectly. Moreover, using the right words and understanding the audience provides insights into unmet needs. The strategy allows a business to better develop its product/service offering and selling strategy to meet its audience’s demand. 

How does Accent Differences Affect Search Engine Optimization?

Accents matter in many languages, not just English, and have a big effect on search marketing results. Search results for each potential accent, implying (but not guaranteeing) that the system differentiates between them. However, the rankings are all different, despite the fact that there will be some overlap, with the top places fluctuating less than the lower entries on the first page. Consequently, the algorithm approaches different forms of spelling in a variety of ways. It only indicates that the prospects exist and have an effect on multi-regional SEO for intelligent marketers. Accents are marks that are placed either above, below, or between existing characters in a textual element in the relevant language. The multi-regional SEO guide frequently discusses the significance of accents for search engine algorithms.  Furthermore, it is quite important to have a proper accent while writing content for search engine optimization (SEO). Therefore, employing accents for various types of audiences is beneficial in terms of ranking the website or the content in various search engine optimization (SEO) internationally.

What are the Similar Accent Differences such as“Center and Centre“?

Listed below are the similar accent difference such as“center“ and“centre“

  • “Meter“ and “Metre“: The words “meter“ and “metre“ are similar to the other accent words “center“ and “centre.“ They are similar to the words“center“ and “centre“ because both have the same definitions when used in a sentence but vary in dialect. The words “meter“ and “metre“ both have the SI base unit of length (equivalent to approximately 39.37 inches), first introduced as a unit of length in the metric system. The only difference between the two is that “meter“ is from the American English language, while the“metre“ is from the British English language. 
  • “Caliber“ and “Calibre“: The words “caliber“ and “calibre“ are similar to the other accent words “center“ and “centre.“ They are similar to the words “center“ and “centre“ because both have the same definitions when used in a sentence but vary in dialect. The words “caliber“ and “calibre“ have the same meaning which is the wood prepared for use in building and carpentry. The only difference between the two is that the word “caliber“ is used in the American English language, whereas the word “calibre“ is used in the British English language. 
  • “Favor“ and “Favour“: The words “favor“ and “favour“ are similar to the other accent words“center“ and“centre.“ They are similar to the words “center“ and “centre“ because both have the same definitions when used in a sentence but vary in dialect. The words “favor“ and “favour“ have the same meaning, which means something nice that one does to help. The only difference between the two is that the word “favor“ is the preferred spelling in American English language. Meanwhile, the word “favour“ is the preferred spelling in the British English language. 
  • “Humor” and “Humour“: The words “humor“ and“humour“ are similar to the other accent words “center“ and “centre.“ They are similar to the words “center“ and “centre“ because both have the same definitions when used in a sentence but vary in dialect. The spelled words “humor“ and “humour“ have the same meaning. It is the ability to be amused by something seen, heard, or thought about. The only difference between the two is that the word “humor“ is the preferred language for American English. On the other hand, the spelled word “humour“ is the preferred language used for British English. 
  • “Liter“ and “Litre“: The words “liter“ and “litre“ are similar to the other accent words “center“ and “centre.“ They are similar to the words “center“ and “centre“ because both have the same definitions when used in a sentence but vary in dialect. The spelled words “liner“ and “litre“ have the same meaning, both means a metric unit of volume. Meanwhile, the difference between the two is the preferred dialect an individual is using. The spelled word “liter“ is the preferred choice of spelled word in American English language. On the other hand, the preferred choice of spelled words for the British English language is “litre.“
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